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Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benezet, Anthony, -1784 (search)
Benezet, Anthony, -1784 Philanthropist; bern in France, Jan. 31, 1713; emigrated to Philadelphia in 1731, and taught school there nearly all his life. He became a member of the Society of Friends; and his life was conspicuous for acts of benevolence. He wrote much against war and African slavery, and bequeathed his estate, on the death of his wife, to the African school in Philadelphia. He died in Philadelphia, May 3, 1784.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vaux, Roberts 1786-1836 (search)
Vaux, Roberts 1786-1836 Jurist; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 25, 1786; received a private school education; admitted to the bar in 1808; and became judge of the county court of Philadelphia in 1835. Most of his life was devoted to charity, education, and the reform of the penal code. He was one of the originators of the public school system of Pennsylvania; a founder of the deaf and dumb asylum, the Philadelphia Savings Funds, and other societies. Among his works are Memoirs of the life of Anthony Benezet; Notices of the original and successive efforts to improve the discipline of the prison at Philadelphia, etc. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 7, 1836.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whittier, John Greenleaf 1807-1892 (search)
pen and shaken over him, until Not Maia's son, with wings for ears, Such plumes about his visage wears, Nor Milton's six-winged angel gathers Such superfluity of feathers ; and, I confess, I was quite unwilling to undergo a martyrdom which my best friends could scarcely refrain from laughing at. But a summons like that of Garrison's bugle-blast could scarcely be unheeded by one who, from birth and education, held fast the traditions of that earlier abolitionism which, under the lead of Benezet and Woolman, had effaced from the Society of Friends every vestige of slave-holding. I had thrown myself, with a young man's fervid enthusiasm, into a movement which commended itself to my reason and conscience, to my love of country and my sense of duty to God and my fellow-men. My first venture in authorship was the publication at my own expense, in the spring of 1833, of a pamphlet entitled Justice and expediency, on the moral and political evils of slavery and the duty of emancipation
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Chapter 4: Enlistment for life (search)
to go to Philadelphia, to urge upon the members of my Religious Society the duty of putting their shoulders to the workto make their solemn testimony against slavery visible over the whole land — to urge them by the holy memories of Woolman, and Benezet, and Tyson, to come up as of old to the standard of Divine Truth, though even the fires of another persecution should blaze around them. But the expenses of the journey will, I fear, be too much for me: as thee know, our farming business does n best friends could scarcely refrain from laughing at. But a summons like that of Garrison's bugle-blast could scarcely be unheeded by me who from birth and education held fast the traditions of that earlier abolitionism which, under the lead of Benezet and Woolman, had effaced from the Society of Friends every vestige of slaveholding. I had thrown myself, with a young man's fervid enthusiasm, into a movement which commended itself to my reason and conscience, to my love of country and my sen
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier, Index. (search)
more, Md., 48, 79. Bancroft, George, 100, 181. Banks, Gen. N. P., 47. Barbadoes, 85. Barclay of Ury, 56. Barefoot boy, the, quoted, 14-16. Barnard, F. A. P., 35. Barton, Bernard, 25; the Letters and poems of, quoted, 174. Batchelder, Charles E., 6 n. Batchelder family, 19, 156. Bates, Charlotte Fiske (Madame Roger), Whittier's letter to, 128-130. Beacon Street, Boston, 3. Bearcamp River, 143. Bell, Mr., 181. Bellingham, Dep. Gov., treatment of Quakers, 84. Benezet, Anthony, 49, 51. Bennington, Vt., 25, 73. Blaine, James G., 181. Border Ruffians, 78. Boston, Mass., 1, 3, 19, 25, 26, 32, 34, 46, 50, 51, 57, 60, 62, 74-78, 81, 85, 88, 91, 108-111, 127, 135, 157, 176, 178; libraries, 34; newspapers, 61; first Quakers in, 84. Boston Transcript, quoted, 90; mentioned, 98, 164. Boutwell, G. S., 97. Bowditch, Dr. Henry I., 78. Bowen, H. C., 143. Brahmo-Somaj, 116. Brainard, J. G. C., 37. Brazil, 100. Bremer, Miss Fredrika, 110. 87 Bright
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Life of Isaac T. Hopper. (search)
lave, and surrendered to his claimant, the magistrate received from five to twenty dollars for his trouble; of course, there was a natural tendency to make the most of evidence in favor of slavery. Under these circumstances, the Pennsylvania Abolition Society was frequently called upon to protect the rights of colored people. Isaac T. Hopper became an active and leading member of this association. He was likewise one of the overseers of a school for colored children, established by Anthony Benezet; and it was his constant practice, for several years, to teach two or three nights every week, in a school for colored adults, established by a society of young men. In process of time, he became known to everybody in Philadelphia as the friend and legal adviser of colored people upon all emergencies. The shrewdness, courage, and zeal, with which he fulfilled this mission will be seen in the course of the following narratives, which I have selected from a vast number of similar charact
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Charles Webster. (search)
posed to hire him to drive the carriage home. But Charles was very well aware that Virginia would be a very dangerous place for him, and he positively refused. The incensed Southerner then claimed his servant's clothes as his property, and ordered him to strip instantly. Charles did as he was ordered, and proceeded to walk out of the room naked. Astonished to find him willing to leave the house in that condition, he seized him violently; thrust him back into the room, and ordered him to dress himself. When he had assumed his garments, he walked off; and the master and servant never met again. Charles was shrewd and intelligent, and conducted himself in such a manner as to gain respect. He married an industrious, economical woman, who served in the family of Chief Justice Tilghman. In process of time, he built a neat two-story house, where they brought up reputably a family of fourteen children, who obtained quite a good education at the school established by Anthony Benezet.
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, The two young offenders. (search)
t millions of money were thus invested. They retained sympathy with the theological opinions of Elias Hicks, but his rousing remonstrances against slavery would have been generally very unwelcome to their ears. They cherished the names of Anthony Benezet, John Woolman, and a host of other departed worthies, whose labors in behalf of the colored people reflected honor on their Society. But where was the need of being so active in the cause, as Isaac T. Hopper was, and always had been? The wr doing good, and whose name, influence, and labors have been devoted with an apostolic simplicity and constancy to humanity, died on Friday last, at an advanced age. He was a Quaker of that early sort illustrated by such philanthropists as Anthony Benezet, Thomas Clarkson, Mrs. Fry, and the like. He was a most self-denying, patient, loving friend of the poor, and the suffering of every kind; and his life was an unbroken history of beneficence. Thousands of hearts will feel a touch of grie
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Zzz Missing head (search)
st friends could scarcely refrain from laughing at. But a summons like that of Garrison's bugle-blast could scarcely be unheeded by one who, from birth and education, held fast the traditions of that earlier abolitionism which, under the lead of Benezet and Woolman, had effaced from the Society of Friends every vestige of slave-holding. I had thrown myself, with a young man's fervid enthusiasm, into a movement which commended itself to my reason and conscience, to my love of country, and my semor. The philosopher, who had been an amused listener, advised the three sages to give up the project of converting the world until they had learned to tolerate each other. Still later, a descendant of the persecuted French Protestants, Anthony Benezet, a man of uncommon tenderness of feeling, began to write and speak against slavery. How far, if at all, he was moved thereto by the example of Woolman is not known, but it is certain that the latter found in him a steady friend and coadjuto
entatives to put a period to negroes' being slaves. In 1712, to a general petition for the emancipation of negro slaves by law, the legislature of Pennsylvania answered that it was neither just nor convenient to set them at liberty; and yet George Keith, the early abolitionist, was followed by the eccentric Benjamin Lay,—by Ralph Sandiford, who held slavery to be inconsistent alike with the rights of man and the principles of Christianity,—and, at a later day, by the amiable enthusiast Anthony Benezet. But did not Christianity enfranchise its converts? The Christian world of that day almost universally revered in Christ the impersonation of the divine wisdom. Could an intelligent being, who, through the Mediator, had participated in the Spirit of God, and, Chap. XXIV.} by his own inward experience, had become conscious of a Supreme Existence, and of relations between that Existence and humanity, be rightfully held in Berkeley's Works, III. 247. Bacon's Laws of Maryland. Law
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