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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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s C. Suydam. Second New York, Captain Andrew S. Glover. Fifth New York, Major Theodore A. Boice. Second Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel George A. Purington. Eighteenth Pennsylvania, Major John W. Phillips. Second brigade: Colonel William Wells. Third Indiana (two companies), Lieutenant Benjamin F. Gilbert. First New Hampshire (battalion), Colonel John L. Thompson. Eighth New York, Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Benjamin. Twenty-second New York, Major Charles C. Brown. First Vermont, Lieutenant-Colonel John W. Bennett. horse-artillery: Second United States, Batteries B and L, Captain Charles H. Peirce. Third United States, Batteries C, F, and K, Captain Dunbar R. Ransom. Toward 6 o'clock the morning of the 19th, the officer on picket duty at Winchester came to my room, I being yet in bed, and reported artillery firing from the direction of Cedar Creek. I asked him if the firing was continuous or only desultory, to which he replied that it was not a sustained fire, but rather irregul
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
mmenced. A very few minutes after Gherardi had left the side of the Richmond, and the other small vessels had left their consorts, a thick mist, with light rain (just enough to wet the deck), passed over the Richmond, obscuring from sight every object outside the vessel; indeed, for a few minutes the bowsprit of the Richmond could not be seen from the poop-deck. This mist and rain, in a cloudless sunshiny day, were slowly wafted over the waters toward the fort and pilot town, enabling John W. Bennett, commanding one of the enemy's gun-boats, and George W. Harrison, commanding the other, to shape their courses for safety, in shoal water, and finally under Fort Morgan. Gherardi in the Port Royal (as soon as he could see) saw only the Selma and Metacomet, and continued his course for them. Capture of the Confederate gun-boat Selma by the Metacomet. from a War-time sketch. Whatever damage was done by the Tennessee to the fleet in passing the fort was by the occasional discharg
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Mobile. (search)
der Dahlgren rifles, 2 howitzers. Gun-boats. Kennebec, Lieut.-Com. W. P. McCann, 1 11-inch, 1 20-pounder, 3 howitzers; Itasca, Lieut.-Com. George Brown, 1 11-inch, 2 32-pounders, 2 20-pounders, 1 howitzer. Confederate fleet.--Admiral Franklin Buchanan, commanding. Iron-Clad ram. Tennessee (flag-ship), Com. J. D. Johnston, 2 7-inch Brooke rifles, 4 6.4-inch Brooke rifles. Side-wheel gun-boats. Morgan, Com. George W. Harrison, 2 7-inch rifles, 4 32-pounders; Gaines, Lieut. J. W. Bennett, 1 8-inch rifle, 5 32-pounders; Selma, Com. P. U. Murphy, 1 6-inch rifle, 3 8-inch shell guns. Land operations against Mobile.--August 5th-23d, 1864. the Union forces were immediately commanded by Maj.-Gen. Gordon Granger (with Maj.-Gen. E. R. S. Canby as his superior), and consisted of the following organizations: Infantry, 77th 111., 94th Ill., 67th Ind., 20th Iowa, 34th Iowa, 38th Iowa, 161st N. Y., 96th Ohio, 20th Wis., 23d Wis., 96th U. S. C. T., and 97th U. S. C. T. Cavalr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The ram Tennessee at Mobile Bay. (search)
ordered me to follow him up the bay; but meanwhile the lashings between each two vessels of the fleet had been cast off, and four gun-boats went immediately in pursuit of the three hastily improvised wooden vessels of our squadron. The Selma was speedily captured by one of these, the Metacomet, after a gallant resistance, during which seven of her crew and her executive officer were killed, and her commander, Lieutenant P. U. Murphy, was slightly wounded. The Gaines, commanded by Lieutenant John W. Bennett, which was run ashore near Fort Morgan to prevent her from sinking, had. received several shots below the water-line, and at night was burned by her own crew. The Morgan, Commander George W. Harrison, ran alongside the wharf at the fort to escape capture, and during the night passed safely through the enemy's fleet up to the city of Mobile. She afterward rendered good service in the defense of the city. While this sort of by-play was in progress the heavier ships of the fleet,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
ennington, Jr.: 1st Conn., Capt. Edwin W. French; 3d N. J., Lieut.-Col. Charles C. Suydam; 2d N. Y., Capt. Andrew S. Glover; 5th N. Y., Maj. Theodore A. Boice; 2d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. George A. Purington; 18th Pa., Maj. John W. Phillips. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 17; m, 8 = 27. Second Brigade, Col. William Wells: 3d Ind. (2 co's), Lieut. Benjamin F. Gilbert; 1st N. H. (batt'n), Col. John L. Thompson; 8th N: Y., Lieut.-Col. William H. Benjamin; 22d N. Y., Maj. Charles C. Brown; 1st Vt., Lieut.-Col. John W. Bennett. Brigade loss: w, 7. horse artillery: B and L, 2d U. S., Capt. Charles H. Peirce; C, F, and K, 3d U. S., Capt. Dunbar R. Ransom. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 1==3. Sheridan's field forces present for duty in the Valley, September 10th, 1864, were about 43,000 officers and men. He had, also, in garrison at Harper's Ferry, Martinsburg, and other points, probably 7000. General Early puts Sheridan's aggregate, September 1st, at 56,618, but this includes troops subsequently left in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
. Wood (1st attack); Act. V. Lieut. F. M. Green (2d attack). Wilderness, Acting Master H. Arey. At the second attack the fleet was composed of the same vessels, with the exception of the Nyack, Keystone State, and Quaker City. The following additions were also made to the fleet: Montgomery, Act. V. Lieut. T. C. Dunn; R. R. Cuyler, Com. C. H. B. Caldwell; Aries, Act. V. Lieut. F. S. Wells; Eolus, Acting Master E. S. Keyser; Fort Donelson, Acting Master G. W. Frost; and Republic, Act. Ens. J. W. Bennett. Armament of the fleet. In the first attack the armament of the fleet was 10 15-inch S. B., 27 11-inch S. B., 1 10-inch S. B., 255 9-inch S. B., 30 8-inch S. B., 3132-pounders S. B., 10 150-pounders R., 37 100-pounders R., 5 60-pounders R., 1 50-pounder R., 43 30-pounders R., 28 20-pounders R.; total guns, 478. Howitzers: 68 24-pounders, 73 12-pounders; total howitzers, 141; grand total, 619. In the second attack there were 1 more 10-inch S. B., 2 fewer 9-inch S. B., 2 more 8
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cruise of the Nashville. (search)
rope. She was a side-wheel, brig-rigged steamer, of about one thousand two hundred or one thousand four hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; Charles M. Fauntleroy, First Lieutenant; John W. Bennett, Second Lieutenant; William C. Whittle, Third Lieutenant; John H. Ingram, Master; Jno. L. Ancrum, Surgeon; Richard Taylor, Paymaster; James Hood, Chief Engineer; Assistant Murray, and two others, and the following Midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton,—— Thomas and —— McClintock. Early in the fall of 1861 she ran out of Charleston, touched at Bermuda for coal and soon arrived at Southampton, England, having ] captured and burned
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on Novembe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
ell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the Atlantic, and on Novembe
er commander was James D. Johnson, with Lieutenants William L. Bradford, A. D. Wharton and F. J. McDermott. The Gaines and Morgan were sister vessels, with their engines (high-pressure) partially protected by 10-inch plates; magazine not entirely below the water-line. They each mounted two banded 32- pounder rifles of fifty-seven hundred weight, four smooth 32's, of fifty-seven hundred weight, and four smooth-bore 32's, of forty-two hundred weight. The Gaines was commanded by First Lieutenant John W. Bennett, and the Morgan by Commander Geo. W. Harrison. The Selma was formerly the steamer Florida, a packet between Mobile and New Orleans, and had her boiler protected by a plating of 1-inch iron; engines not protected. She was commanded by First Lieutenant P. A. Murphy and mounted four guns--two 9-inch Dahlgren, one 8-inch shell gun and one 32-pounder banded rifle, of fifty-seven hundred weight. The three wooden vessels are large side-wheel steamers, totally unfit for vessels of wa