Your search returned 574 results in 204 document sections:

... 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
the candor on several occasions to admit the defeats of his countrymen, and we award him credit accordingly. As to Bennett, of the Herald, we know not what to make of him. The war made him no worse than he ever was, only, like the Day of Judgmver, that we have heard of, from any motive but the interests of the North. It could not be expected that such a man as Bennett should ever be governed by any but mercenary considerations. These had been the only principles ever recognized in the believers, least of all those who are its own editors and conductors. It may be said, however, both of Raymond and Bennett, as it cannot be said of George D. Prentice, of the Louisville Journal, that they are true to the section in which they live and from which they derive their patronage. If Bennett, the Scotchman, were to advocate the cause of England, in the event of an English invasion of the United States, he might then present a parallel to the moral and political turpitude of Ge
The Daily Dispatch: October 8, 1862., [Electronic resource], Purchase of Clyde steamers for running the Floored. (search)
n would only issue such a proclamation; but according to a Boston paper, published since the proclamation, the highways continue unobstructed. It is in vain that Bennett, of the Herald, insists that Grealey, of the Tribune, shall now buckles on his armor, Grealey, who is almost as pusillanimous as Bennett, refuses to do any such tBennett, refuses to do any such thing. Henry Ward Deecher is requested by a Sergeant of Corcoran's brigade to enlist in that estimable corps, and become indignant at the idea; and considers it an insult. It is evident that the Abolitionists have no idea of fighting, and are just as ridiculous as the conservatives represent them.--Granting all this, what are we tifference between them, except that the conservatives are greater hypocrites. We know not why a Southern man should have any choice between Corcoran and Beecher, Bennett and Greeley, Butler and Wendell Phillips. If it be true that the Abolitionists have staid at home, and left the conservatives to fight the battles of the Union,
es had rated at 25,000 men. We thought it an extraordinary achievement to capture so strong a place (so strongly defended) by assault. The enigmatical character of the telegram led the public to think that the battle had not been decisive, and we now see the result. The Yankees will raise a yell of triumph over this victory, so unusual a thing has it been for them not to be beaten of late. Lincoln will order a day of thanksgiving. New York will burn all the tar barrels it has left. Bennett will tell ten thousand lies, and the "little villain" will to them all. The world will be told that this single battle more than imbalances the deflate of the Yankees. We shall bear, no doubt, that fifty thousand prisoners and a thousand guns were taken. But patience; our time will come next, and we will pay all back with interest. We are not so badly off as we were after the capture of Fort Donelson, and we have greatly more than retrieved that disaster. This reverse will only ac
The Northern elections. The elections thus far seem to have gone largely in favor of the Democratic party. Both Ohio and Pennsylvania have returned a majority of Democratic representatives to Congress, and persons well acquainted with New York politics believe that the city of New York will give a majority of 40,000 for the Democratic ticket. In the meantime, however, Bennett, who but the other day published an article in which he foreshadowed curses that have fallen on no city since the fall of Jerusalem as destined to fall upon New York in the event of Wadsworth's election, has faced to the right about and shouts vehemently for that very Wadsworth. Perhaps he may have received orders from Washington — perhaps he may have been bribed, as some of our contemporaries conjecture — but the most probable surmise is that he sees something in the atmosphere which indicates the certain election of his new favorite. It can make very little difference with us, we imagine, whether
McClellan and Bennett, Bennett tells us that McClellan is again in the saddle; so he, himself, of course, is again on his high horse. He says McClellan is fifty miles nearer Richmond than Gen.Bennett tells us that McClellan is again in the saddle; so he, himself, of course, is again on his high horse. He says McClellan is fifty miles nearer Richmond than Gen. Lee is. He was once within five miles of it, but he did not get here. It is not wonderful that he should be so near now. He was nearer at Berkeley than he was at Mechanicville, though Berkeley itself is thirty miles off, and Mechanicville but five. Bennett lauds what he calls McClellan's "marvellous strategic powers."--They are indeed wonderful. He contrived to "change his base" before Richmond, without running more than thirty miles. "Slowly and surely," Bennett says, "our army is moving on to Richmond." Sennett The very words the Herald used when McClellan was advancing from thecClellan was advancing from the Peninsula. A wonderful man is Mr. Bennett, to gain victories for McClellan on paper. It is fortunate for us that paper victories do not rout armies or take cities.
Captain Semmes an old and says that a reward ought to be offered for his head. It is perfectly delightful to hear Bennett talking in this fashion, for it above that New York commerce in suffering in its most sensitive nerve. Not the loss of y put a Capt Semmes on board too Vandered? That is the question. We will not stop to baddy head names with the to Bennett. If Semmes is an old villain, Bennett may be an old saint out is sanctity is so very old that it is somewhat musty. IfBennett may be an old saint out is sanctity is so very old that it is somewhat musty. If Semmes deserves to go to the devil, Bennett deserves to go to heaven, though, if he ever got there, the angels would fly away in horror and leave him alone in his glory. But as to the reward for Capt Semmes's head, that is a different affair and pBennett deserves to go to heaven, though, if he ever got there, the angels would fly away in horror and leave him alone in his glory. But as to the reward for Capt Semmes's head, that is a different affair and proposes a game at which can play. Let the Yankees, if they can catch his prepare to cock him and there will be such an auto Yankee carcasses as will put to ridicule all the achievements of the inquisition Privates in is a Yankee invention, but t
ed Jones for defendant — judgment of Circuit Court of Chesterfield reversed. The insurance Company of the Valley of Virginia vs. Smith — argued by Macfarland and Roberts and James Alfred Jones for plaintiff, and B. R. Wellford, jr, and Wm. W. Crump for defendant — judgment of the Circuit Court of the city of Richmond reversed. Howard vs. Holt — argued by James Garland for plaintiff, and C. R. Slaughter for defendant — judgment of the Circuit Court of Campbell county reversed. Bennett, auditor, &c, vs. Hancock — argued by J. Randolph Tucker for plaintiff, and C. C. McRae for defendant — judgment of the Circuit Court of the city of Richmond affirmed. C. S. District Court.--This Court will be in session to-day, when Judge Halyburton will deliver a decision in the famous case in which the French Government is interested, in regard to a large quantity of tobacco hitherto a subject of controversy as liable to confiscation. We understand that the decision has been
E, 9th N C; M, Collier, co E, 7th N C, S Lambert, co K, 7th N C, H W Barns, co G, 5th Ala; R E Moody, co D, 53d Va; E Johnson, co D, 33d N C; Wa Grosan, co G, 16th Ga; G D Hilman, co D, 51st Ga; W D Soules, co E, 8th Fla; Lt J D Finley, co A, 18th Miss; Lt W Baskin, co K, 18th Miss; J H O Kean, co G, 18th Miss; Sgt J V Prudy, co D, 18th Miss; H Carroll, co C, 8th Fla; G Allen, co E, 18th Miss; R F Sellers, co E, 13th Miss; J E Eaves, co E, 13th Miss; N P Russell, co K, 21st Miss; J E Bennett, co K, 21st Miss; N Heim, co K, 21st Miss; J C Williams, co K, 21st Miss; Lt J W Price, co K, 17th Miss; Cpl C Gramer, co K, 17th Miss; J M Comer, co G, 18th Miss; J McCade, co G, 8th Fla; H Strong, co I, 21st Miss; J Schneckenburg, co B, 17th Miss; F M Carter, co G, 13th Miss; T J Tidwell, co C, 17th Miss; S S Lynch, co B, 17th Miss; J R Holt, co A, 21st Miss; Lt J B Clayton, co G, 17th Miss; J Brady, co A, 18th Miss; W F McDougal, co E, 17th Miss; S D Knapp, co D, 17th Miss; Sergt R J Beg
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1862., [Electronic resource], Reported Junction of Sigel with Burnside. (search)
Prison items. --The following parties were carried to the military prison of the Eastern District yesterday, viz: J. R. Napier, H. D. Martin J J Gusler, J. E. Newman, Wm. H Bennett, all of the 12th Virginia, to be returned to their regiment; Pendleton Gilbert, 24th Virginia, deserter; John Allen, 5th Virginia; J M Hinson, 20th N C; John Gallian. William H. Goings, Dan Hawks, 53d Nc, do; F. W. Cook, of the 7th Miss, arrested for not having his proper vouchers, was sent to Chimborazo Hospital; Robt Waller, a soldier charged with theft, was sent in by the city police; Henry Hain, 10th Virginia artillery, deserter; Peter Fullerton, Patrick Brick, and Geo Warnkin, disloyal citizens of Prince William county, were sent from Gordonsville by Maj Boyle, the Provost Marshal at that place.
. The Abolitionists were driven from their position, then through their camps, their battery of fine Parrott guns captured, and finally hemmed in on the river bank, where they surrendered. The fight lasted for one hour and twenty minutes; but in that brief period the firing was rapid and the contest severe. Many gallant spirits fell on our side, but we heaped the field with thrice the number of Yankee said. The town of Hartsville and some four hundred of the enemy were captured by Col. Bennett's command. To John Basor, of company C, 9th Kentucky regiment, belongs the honor of capturing the battery flag of the enemy. It is a beautiful piece of sill bunting, with the letter B upon it. The 9th regiment also has the flag of the 104th Illinois regiment. The 2d regiment brought off the colors of the 106th Ohio, which, before reaching town, were, by order of Major James W. Hewitt, reversed, the Union down — a signal of distress. But the most remarkable fact connected with the
... 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21