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Borgia at the South.--The rebels are repeating their attempts at poisoning. the Louisville Democrat makes the following statement: While a young man named Bennett, member of Captain Dill's Company of the Twenty-fourth Indiana regiment, was walking backward and forward as sentinel, outside of Lafayette Park, St. Louis, near the entrance, he was approached by a young man, who, with a friendly face, asked the sentinel if he did not feel weary, to which the soldier replied, Yes, I do feel a little tired, when the kind-faced stranger, after a word or two of further conversation, asked him if he would not accept a piece of his pie. The sentinel thanked him with heartfelt gratitude, and ate the pie. Shortly afterward he was seized with convulsions, and was carried by his comrades to the hospital tent. The physician of the regiment found that he was poisoned with strychnine. One of these rebel Borgias, however, met a sudden fate, a few days since, in the Federal camp at Buckey's Tow
oms which I would bestow, If you and your party would only agree To fall down in worship and homage to me; Obey my directions, fulfil my commands, Spread carnage and death over all these lands, By a horrible warfare, such as would win Success to my cause, and a triumph to sin. To all of these terms you most promptly agreed, And made them your grounds of political creed; I gave you my subjects — the best I have got, Such as Cameron, and Seward, and Old Granny Scott; Assisted by Greeley, and Bennett, and Weed, As miserable scoundrels as Tophet could breed, To fix up a plan for preserving the Union, In the bonds of a happy fraternal communion, By a terrible warfare of conquest and blood, Such as never was known since the day of the flood. I gave you my minions from the purlieus of hell, The ranks of your fearful grand army to swell; I stirred up the North with its vagabond crew, And set witch-burning Yankeedom all in a stew, With its isms and schisms — fanatical trappings-- Its free-lo
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
retty well commanded; and I had reason to believe that I had one of the best brigades in the whole army. Captain Ayres's battery of the Third Regular Artillery was also attached to my brigade. The other regiment, the Twenty-ninth New York, Colonel Bennett, was destined to be left behind in charge of the forts and camps during our absence, which was expected to be short. Soon after I had assumed the command, a difficulty arose in the Sixty-ninth, an Irish regiment. This regiment had volunteean which way to drive. Intending to begin on the right and follow round to the left, I turned the driver into a side-road which led up a very steep hill, and, seeing a soldier, called to him and sent him up hurriedly to announce to the colonel (Bennett, I think) that the President was coming. As we slowly ascended the hill, I discovered that Mr. Lincoln was full of feeling, and wanted to encourage our men. I asked if he intended to speak to them, and he said he would like to. I asked him then
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
t where we could be private, and General Johnston said he had passed a small farm-house a short distance back, when we rode back to it together side by side, our staff-officers and escorts following. We had never met before, though we had been in the regular army together for thirteen years; but it so happened that we had never before come together. lie was some twelve or more years my senior; but we knew enough of each other to be well acquainted at once. We soon reached the house of a Mr. Bennett, dismounted, and left our horses with orderlies in tie road. Our officers, on foot, passed into the yard, and General Johnston and I entered the small frame-house. We asked the farmer if we could have the use of his house for a few minutes, and he and his wife withdrew into a smaller log-house, which stood close by. As soon as we were alone together I showed him the dispatch announcing Mr. Lincoln's assassination, and watched him closely. The perspiration came out in large drops on
Hardee's Tactics.--Hardee was Chief of a Board to translate a system of Light Infantry Tactics from the French. Lieut. Bennett of the Ordnance did the work, every word of it; and Hardee's name was attached to the translation! He never, in all probability, saw or read one word of it, until called upon to study it for the purpose of learning how to drill the cadets at West Point, when appointed to command them. He was the Commandant of Cadets, not the Superintendent of the Institution, for Point, when appointed to command them. He was the Commandant of Cadets, not the Superintendent of the Institution, for four years. As a soldier, his reputation in the army was never above mediocrity; to science he never made any pretension; and if we put him down as a tolerable cavalry officer, full justice is done him. As to Hardee's Tactics, that is a French book, translated by Lieut. Bennett-Hardee being President of the Board which adopted it for our service.--N. Y. Courier and Enquirer.
ot known — and its defenses, including Fort Sumter, the bombardment of which, nearly four years before, had precipitated the mighty conflict, were occupied by Colonel Bennett, who came over from Morris Island. On March 11th, Sherman reached Fayetteville, North Carolina, where he destroyed a fine arsenal. Hitherto, Sherman's marota Regiment, which had joined Sherman on his second march, was with him when Johnston's surrender wrote Finis to the last chapter of the war, April 27, 1865. In Bennett's little farmhouse, near Durham's Station, N. C., were begun the negotiations between Johnston and Sherman which finally led to that event. The two generals met e just received telling of the assassination of Lincoln. Color-guard of the eighth Minnesota--with Sherman when Johnston surrendered The end of the march — Bennett's farmhouse henceforth this was changed. General Joseph E. Johnston, his old foe of Resaca and Kenesaw Mountain, had been recalled and was now in command of the
ot known — and its defenses, including Fort Sumter, the bombardment of which, nearly four years before, had precipitated the mighty conflict, were occupied by Colonel Bennett, who came over from Morris Island. On March 11th, Sherman reached Fayetteville, North Carolina, where he destroyed a fine arsenal. Hitherto, Sherman's marota Regiment, which had joined Sherman on his second march, was with him when Johnston's surrender wrote Finis to the last chapter of the war, April 27, 1865. In Bennett's little farmhouse, near Durham's Station, N. C., were begun the negotiations between Johnston and Sherman which finally led to that event. The two generals met e just received telling of the assassination of Lincoln. Color-guard of the eighth Minnesota--with Sherman when Johnston surrendered The end of the march — Bennett's farmhouse henceforth this was changed. General Joseph E. Johnston, his old foe of Resaca and Kenesaw Mountain, had been recalled and was now in command of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg. (search)
f Iverson's brigade, to push the enemy in front. This was done. The enemy, seeing his right flank turned, made but feeble resistance to the front attack, but ran off the field in confusion, leaving his killed and wounded, and between 800 and 900 prisoners in our hands. The enemy was pushed through Gettysburg to the heights beyond, when I received an order to halt and form line of battle in a street in Gettysburg running east and west. To Colonel Parker, Thirtieth North Carolina; Colonel Bennett, Nineteenth North Carolina; Colonel Grimes, Fourth North Carolina, and Major Hurt, Second North Carolina, my thanks are due for the skill and gallantry displayed by them in this day's fight. Lieutenant Harvey, Fourteenth North Carolina sharpshooters, commanding sharpshooters, deserves especial praise for his daring conduct. He whipped a Yankee regiment (150th Pennsylvania) with his sharpshooters, and took their regimental colors from them with his own hands. Colonel Battle, with the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of the artillery of the army of Western Louisiana, after the battle of Pleasant Hill. (search)
hon, Mosely's and J. A. A. West's of his, Lennies battalion of horse artillery; and Major Faries, Chief of Artillery of Polignac's division, commanding on the left, was ordered to place in position Cornay's and Barnes's light batteries, and Lieutenant Bennett, with his two thirty-pound Parrott's. Lieutenant Tarleton was in command of Cornay's battery. On the 16th, before sunrise, the engagement commenced, and soon swelled into the proportions of the most considerable artillery combat ever witd General Wharton, satisfied with the results that he had obtained, determined to withdraw, which was done without the least confusion. Major Semmes with great deliberation withdrew his batteries en echelon from our right; and on the left, Lieutenant Bennett with his heavy Parrotts, was first withdrawn, followed by Barnes, who had exhausted all his long range ammunition; Lieutenant Tarleton, commanding Cornay's battery, was the last to retire, and from his Napoleon section poured a heavy fire i
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 17: (search)
e proposed to General Sherman another armistice and conference for that purpose, suggesting as a basis, the clause of the recent convention relating to the army. This was reported to the Confederate Government at once. General Sherman's dispatch, expressing his agreement to a conference, was received soon after sunrise on the 26th; and I set out for the former place of meeting, as soon as practicable, after announcing to the Administration that I was about to do so. We met at noon in Mr. Bennett's house as before. I found General Sherman, as he appeared in our previous conversation, anxious to prevent further bloodshed, so we agreed without difficulty upon terms putting an end to the war within the limits of our commands which happened to be co-extensive-terms which we expected to produce a general pacification. As will be remembered, Mr. Stanton caused to be made public the following among others, as the grounds upon which the original terms were rejected: First—It w
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