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in attendance, who became subscribers to the declaration that was promulgated: Maine David Thurston, Nathan Winslow, Joseph Southwick, James F. Otis, Isaac Winslow. New Hampshire David Campbell. Massachusetts Daniel Southmayd, Effingham C. Capron, Amos Phelps, John G. Whittier, Horace P. Wakefield, James Barbadoes, David T. Kimball, Jr., Daniel E. Jewitt, John R. Campbell, Nathaniel Southard, Arnold Buffum, William Lloyd Garrison. Rhode island John Prentice, George W. Benson. Connecticut Samuel J. May, Alpheus Kingsley, Edwin A. Stillman, Simeon Joselyn, Robert B. Hall. New York Beriah Green. Lewis Tappan, John Rankin, William Green, Jr., Abram T. Cox, William Goodell, Elizur Wright, Jr., Charles W. Denison, John Frost. New Yersey Jonathan Parkhurst, Chalkly Gillinghamm, John McCullough, James White. Pennsylvania Evan Lewis, Edwin A. Altee, Robert Purviss, James McCrummill, Thomas Shipley, Bartholomew Fussell, David Jones, Enoch Mac
Rhode island John Prentice, George W. Benson.
lecturers, 76-78; orators, 88-93; women, 100-107; mobs, 008-1 2; in Haverhill, 108; in Nantucket, 09; martyrs, 113-120; sentiment in England, 130. Anti-Slavery societies, organization, 26; in New England, 72, 74, 75, 130, 200; National, 76, 79, 87, 201. Anti-Unionist, 13. B Bacon, Benjamin C., 201. Bailey, Dr. Gamaliel, 100, 207. Ballou, Adin, 205. Barbadoes, James, 202. Bates, Judge, 61. Beecher, Henry Ward, 90, 142, 148; speech in England, 90-93; and Lincoln, 92. Bell, 152. Benson, George W., 203. Benton, Thomas H., 154. Birney, Jas. G., 2, 5, 42, 56-58, 205. Black laws 35;in Ohio, 35. Black Republic of Texas, 135. Blair, Gen. Frank P., 158, 186-191; and Missouri emancipationists, i 6; and Missouri Abolitionists, 188; appearance of, 189; fearlessness, 189; quarrel with Fremont, 189; and capture of Camp Jackson, 189-1911; threats against, 190. Blair, Montgomery, 158, 161. Bonner, Hon. Benjamin R., 155. Border-ruffianism, 153. Border Slave-State message, text of
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 8: colorphobia. (search)
rotten eggs and stones, and daubed it with filth. This drama of diabolism was fitly ended by the introduction of the fire fiend, and the burning of the detestable building devoted to the higher education of niggers. Heathenism was, indeed, outdone by Canterbury Christianity. The circumstances of this outrage kindled Garrison's indignation to the highest pitch. Words were inadequate to express his emotions and agony of soul. In the temper of bold and clear-eyed leadership he wrote George W. Benson, his future brotherin-law, we may as well, first as last, meet this proscriptive spirit, and conquer it. We-i. e., all the friends of the cause-must make this a common concern. The New Haven excitement has furnished a bad precedent — a second must not be given or I know not what we can do to raise up the colored population in a manner which their intellectual and moral necessities demand. In Boston we are all excited at the Canterbury affair. Colonizationists are rejoicing and Abolit
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 9: agitation and repression. (search)
York to the friends of immediate emancipation throughout the North. As an evidence of the dangerously excited state of the popular mind on the subject of slavery there stands in the summons the significant request to delegates to regard the call as confidential. The place fixed upon for holding the convention was Philadelphia, and the time December 4, 1833. Garrison bestirred himself to obtain for the convention a full representation of the friends of freedom. He sent the call to George W. Benson, at Providence, urging him to spread the news among the Abolitionists of his neighborhood and to secure the election of a goodly number of delegates by the society in Rhode Island. He forthwith bethought him of Whittier on his farm in Haverhill, and enjoined his old friend to fail not to appear in Philadelphia. But while the young poet longed to go to urge upon his Quaker brethren of that city to make their solemn testimony against slavery visible over the whole land — to urge them,
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 12: flotsam and jetsam. (search)
ption list in one day. It received significant illustration also in Garrison's nomination to the legislature. In this way did between seventy and eighty citizens testify their sympathy for him and their reprobation of mob rule. In yet another way was its influence felt, and this was in the renewed zeal and activity which it instantly produced on the part of the Abolitionists themselves. It operated upon the movement as a powerful stimulus to fresh sacrifices and unwearied exertions. George W. Benson, Garrison's brother-in-law, led off bravely in this respect, as the following extract from a letter written by him in Boston, two days after the riot, to Garrison, at Brooklyn, well illustrates. He had come up to the city from Providence the night before, in quest of his sister and her husband. Not finding them, he turned to the cause which had been so ruthlessly attacked, and this is the sort of care which he bestowed upon it. He got Burleigh to write a general relation of the mob f
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 13: the barometer continues to fall. (search)
enlightener. After that occurrence the gentlemen of property scattered through the free States devoted themselves less to the violent suppression of Abolitionism and more to the forcible suppression, upon occasion, of the alarming manifestations of popular lawlessness, which found significant demonstration just a week later in the city of Boston. Mr. Garrison has preserved for us an instructive account of this affair, too, and here is the story as told by him to his brother-in-law, George W. Benson, in a letter dated May 25th: The spirit of mobocracy, like the pestilence, is contagious; and Boston is once more ready to reenact the riotous scenes of 1835. The Marlboroa Chapel, having just been completed, and standing in relation to our cause just as did Pennsylvania Hall, is an object of pro-slavery malevolence. Ever since my return, threats have been given out that the chapel should share the fate of the hall. Last evening was the time for its dedication; and, so threatening wa
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Chapter 14: brotherly love fails, and ideas abound. (search)
serting in turn its moral primacy. For an instant the vision of the great soul grew dim, the great heart seemed'to have lost its bearings. All of the new ideas thawed and melted into each other, dissolved into one vague and grand solidarity of reforms. The voice of the whole was urging him amid the gathering moral confusion to declare himself for all truth, and he hearkened irresolute, with divided mind. I feel somewhat at a loss to know what to do --he confesses at this juncture to George W. Benson, whether to go into all the principles of holy reform and make the Abolition cause subordinate, or whether still to persevere in the one beaten track as hitherto. Circumstances hereafter must determine this matter. That was written in August, 1837; a couple of months later circumstances had not determined the matter, it would seem, from the following extract from a letter to his brother-in-law: It is not my intention at present to alter either the general character or course of the Li
Archibald H. Grimke, William Lloyd Garrison the Abolitionist, Index. (search)
dard, 299. Atchison, David, 338, 374. Attucks, Crispus, 227. Bacon, Leonard W., 162. Bartlett, Ezekiel, 18, 20. Beecher, Lyman, Iio, III, 16I, 189, 190, 269. Benson, George, 194, 263. Benson, George W., 168, 178, 234, 260, 281. Benson, Henry E., 212, 263. Benton, Thomas H., 105-106, 252, 253, Bird, Frank W., 361. Birney, Benson, George W., 168, 178, 234, 260, 281. Benson, Henry E., 212, 263. Benton, Thomas H., 105-106, 252, 253, Bird, Frank W., 361. Birney, James G., 203, 298, 320. Bond, Judge, 382. Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, 217, 233, 240. Bourne, Rev. George, i08, 203. Bowditch, Henry I., 233, 349, 389. Bright, John, 390, 391. Brooks, Preston S., 359. Brown, John, 365-368. Buffum, Arnold, 139, 177. Burleigh, Charles C., 221, 223, 235. Buxton, Thomas Fowell, 152, Benson, Henry E., 212, 263. Benton, Thomas H., 105-106, 252, 253, Bird, Frank W., 361. Birney, James G., 203, 298, 320. Bond, Judge, 382. Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society, 217, 233, 240. Bourne, Rev. George, i08, 203. Bowditch, Henry I., 233, 349, 389. Bright, John, 390, 391. Brooks, Preston S., 359. Brown, John, 365-368. Buffum, Arnold, 139, 177. Burleigh, Charles C., 221, 223, 235. Buxton, Thomas Fowell, 152, 154, 204. Calhoun, John C., 246, 252, 315, 335, 336, 337, 352, 353, 384. Campbell, John Reid, 225. Channing, Dr. W. E., IIo, III, 256, 316. Chapman, Maria Weston, 223, 258, 259, 277, 292. Chase, Salmon P., 338. Child, David Lee, 134, 136, 138, 203. Child, Lydia Maria, 186, 203, 210, 277, 292, 309. Clay, Henry, 339, 348. C
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
s. On October 2, Mr. Garrison writes to G. W. Benson: I have not got regulated yet, since myed by accepting Ms. Aug. 7, 1835, Henry to G. W. Benson. the escort of ladies. A similar experieard to my dear wife (Ms. Oct. 26, 1835, to G. W. Benson). When the tidings were brought to her of wivate letters: George Benson to George W. Benson. Brooklyn, Conn., October 23, 1835. Ms.is manner cold and unsympathetic. George W. Benson to W. L. Garrison, at Brooklyn. Providen and ever your unwavering friend. George W. Benson to Henry E. Benson. Providence, October however, William Chace, The partner of George W. Benson. G. W. Benson. his father, Mr. Stanton, MG. W. Benson. his father, Mr. Stanton, Mr. Goodell, and many other of our abolition brethren—and I need not add that we had a joyous meeting the day following Thanksgiving he wrote to G. W. Benson: A letter from friend Burleigh, at thf its principles. W. L. Garrison to G. W. Benson, at Providence. Brooklyn, November 30, 183
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