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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.69 (search)
same battle. G. C. Bailey, died at home, 1894 or 1895. Robert H. Bailey, living. Granville F. Bailey, living. Nicholas B. Bailey, living. Festus Bailey, died at home, 1892. William Bowling, supposed to be dead. Jesse Bowling, living. Charles Burroughs, killed at Gettysburg. John Brown, killed at Williamsburg. Thomas C. Brown, lost a leg in 1862 at Frazier's Farm; yet living. William McH. Belcher. George P. Belcher, wounded at Seven Pines; living. Bluford W. Bird, living. Robert Bacheldor, living. L. A. Cooper, captured at Williamsburg and never returned. R. C. Cooper, living. Squire Cook, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. C. W. Cooper, lived through the war; now supposed to be dead, John Coburn, living; wounded at Frazier's Farm and second battle of Manassas. Second Lieutenant William Mc. Calfee, died 1861, of fever, at Camp Ellis, near Manassas. H. Milton Calfee, killed at Frazier's Farm, 1862. Henderson French Calfee, ki
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
composed of survivors of the fight, has supported the Salem church Sunday-School for thirty years. When Sheridan marched through to Washington in 1865, said Colonel Bird, he saw many bodies still unburied, and reported that fact. I came down here to bury them. As he spoke he also pointed out many places where bodies had been plainly discernable, but at Bloody Angle itself the works were not so well preserved. Standing on the brow of the hill, where the fiercest fighting occurred, Colonel Bird, who was on General Barlow's staff, pointed out where he had helped to form the army assigned to attack the Confederate works at the angle thereafter to be kno disorganized. For twenty hours the fighting continued, re-enforcements coming up on both sides. The Landrum house, near which Hancock's men were massed by Colonel Bird, still stands, and is occupied by the Landrum family. We had 500 bodies in and around our house, said Mr. Landrum, as he told of his experiences during the fi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company G, Twenty-Fourth Virginia Infantry. From the Richmond Dispatch, June 17, 1901. (search)
t same battle. G. C. Bailey, died at home, 1894 or 1895. Robert H. Bailey, living. Granville F. Bailey, living. Nicholas B. Bailey, living. Festus Bailey, died at home, 1892. William Bolling, supposed to be dead. Jesse Bowling, living. Charles Burroughs, killed at Gettysburg. John Brown, killed at Williamsburg. Thomas C. Brown, lost a leg in 1862 at Frazier's Farm; yet living. William McH. Belcher. George P. Belcher, wounded at Seven Pines; living. Bluford W. Bird, living. Robert Bacheldor, living. L. A. Cooper, captured at Williamsburg and never returned. R. C. Cooper, living. C. W. Cooper, lived through the war; now supposed to be dead. Squire Cook, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. John Coburn, living; wounded at Frazier's Farm and Second Battle Manassas. Second-Lieutenant William McCalfee; died 1861, of fever at Camp Ellis, near Manassas. H. Milton Calfee, killed at Frazier's Farm, 1862. Henderson French Calfee, killed at