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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 18 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 15 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
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commanded by Colonels J. G. Lauman, Morgan L. Smith, and J. Cook. Lauman had the Second, Seventh, and Fourteenth Iowa; the Twenty-fifth and Fifty-sixth Indiana; Birge's regiment of sharp-shooters, and Stone's Missouri Battery. M. L. Smith had the Eighth Missouri and Eleventh Indiana; and Cook had the Seventh and Fiftieth Illinoiglesby's brigade on the right, and W. H. L. Wallace's, next to it, moved to the right, along the road to Dover, keeping up a constant cannonade as they advanced. Birge's sharp-shooters, a picked corps, deployed as skirmishers, annoyed the Confederates greatly, compelling them to lie low behind their intrenchments. But skillful Sade: the Second Iowa, Colonel Tuttle; Twenty-fifth Indiana, Colonel Veatch; Seventh Iowa, Colonel Parrott; Fourteenth Iowa, Colonel Shaw; Fifty-second Indiana, and Birge's regiment of sharp-shooters. The Second Iowa led the assault. Smith formed the regiment in two lines, with a front of five companies each, thirty paces apart
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
two miles from Dover there was a log-house, at the time occupied by a Mrs. Crisp. As the road to Dover ran close by, it was made the headquarters of the commanding General. All through the night of the 12th, the coming and going was incessant. Smith was ordered to find a position in front of the enemy's right wing, which would place him face to face with Buckner. McClernand's order was to establish himself on the enemy's left, where he would be opposed to Pillow. a little before dawn Birge's sharp-shooters were astir. Theirs was a peculiar service. Each was a preferred marksman, and carried a long-range Henry rifle, with sights delicately arranged as for target practice. In action each was perfectly independent. They never maneuvered as a corps. When the time came they were asked, canteens full?, Biscuits for all day? then their only order, all right; hunt your holes, boys. Thereupon they dispersed, and, like Indians, sought cover to please themselves behind rocks and s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
John Cook: 7th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Andrew J. Babcock; 50th Ill., Col. Moses M. Bane; 52d Ind., Col. James M. Smith; 12th Iowa, Col. J. J. Woods; 13th Mo., Col. Crafts J. Wright; Batteries D, H, and K, 1st Mo. Lt. Artillery, Capts. Henry Richardson, F. Welker, and George H. Stone. Brigade loss: k, 10; w, 109; m, 2 = 121. Fourth Brigade, Col. Jacob G. Lauman: 25th Ind., Col. James C. Veatch; 2d Iowa, Col. James M. Tuttle; 7th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James C. Parrott; 14th Iowa, Col. William T. Shaw; Birge's Mo. Sharp-shooters. Brigade loss: k, 55; w, 301; m, 1 = 357. Fifth Brigade, Col. Morgan L. Smith: 11th Ind., Col. George F. McGinnis; 8th Mo., Major John McDonald. Brigade-loss: k, 11; w, 69 = 80. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Lew Wallace. First Brigade, Col. Charles Cruft: 31st Ind., Lieut.-Col. John Osborn, Major Fred. Arm; 44th Ind., Col. Hugh B. Reed; 17th Ky., Col. John H. McHenry, Jr.; 25th Ky., Col. James M. Shackelford. Brigade loss: k, 35; w, 182 ;: m, 16 = 233. Second Brigade
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
as a strong flank, and says it was occupied by Birge's sharp-shooters. Off to the right is seen Leurred an incident I have never seen recorded. Birge's sharp-shooters, or Squirrel Tails, occupied mbellishment, was a thorough delusion; that — Birge's sharp-shooters were not there, and that Genen that point is sustained by the reports, that Birge's sharp-shooters were immediately on his rightition indicated in Sherman's revised map, that Birge's sharp-shooters were on his right — not entirs right. Buckland seems to know nothing about Birge's sharp-shooters. The probable explanation ise he is described by Sherman as being, between Birge's sharp-shooters and the rest of the line. retired to within half a mile of the landing. Birge's sharp-shooters retained their position at orriver, where I found him about dark, excepting Birge's sharp-shooters, the 13th Missouri, and the 4seventh position, and the troops assisted were Birge's sharp-shooters. General Sherman makes no me[3 more...]<
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Shiloh. (search)
.-Col. James Baker; 7th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. James C. Parrott; 12th Iowa, Col. Joseph J. Woods (w), Capt. Samuel R. Edgington; 14th Iowa, Col. William T. Shaw. Brigade loss: k, 39; w, 143; m, 676 = 858. (A number of the captured or missing were also wounded.) Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John McArthur (w), Col. Thomas Morton: 9th Ill., Col. August Mersy; 12th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Augustus L. Chetlain, Capt. James R. Hugunin; 81st Ohio, Col. Thomas Morton; 13th Mo., Col. Crafts J. Wright; 14th Mo. (Birge's Sharp-shooters), Col. B. S. Compton. Brigade loss: k, 99; w, 470; m, 11 = 580. Third Brigade, Col. Thomas W. Sweeny (w), Col. Silas D. Baldwin: 8th Iowa, Col. James L. Geddes (w and c); 7th 111., Maj. Richard Rowett; 50th Ill., Col. Moses M. Bane (w); 52d Ill., Maj. Henry Stark, Capt. Edwin A. Bowen; 57th Ill., Col. Silas D. Baldwin, Lieut.-Col. F. J. Hurlbut; 58th Ill., Col. William F. Lynch (c). Brigade loss: k, 127; w, 501; m, 619-= 1247. (A number of the captured or missing were also
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 66: cruelties practised at Fortress Monroe. (search)
on the cot, covered his ironed limbs with the blanket, and felt only a more intense contempt for the brutality with which he was treated than when a few minutes before he had announced his belief that he was to be tortured to death, and defied the power which attempted to degrade him. Of the dramatic account published in Dr. Craven's book, The good doctor probably received the account from some unreliable person. So revolting was the recital to all honorable and brave men, that General Birge, of whose kind heart I had several proofs, wrote to me not to be disturbed, the act could not have been perpetrated; and there are certainly many persons in the North now who have not accepted it as a fact. he said it could not have been written by anyone who either knew the facts, or had such personal knowledge of him as to form a just idea of what his conduct would be under such circumstances. The fact, he added, was, that very little was said either by Captain Titlow or by himself, a
aving declined to get soldiers' rations by application for them to this Government. In this condition I remained for many weeks, until, fortunately for me, General Birge relieved him, but had it not in his power, however, to remove the restrictions any further than to take the detectives away, of whom I heard, but did not see. General Birge permitted me to write unrestrictedly to whom I pleased, and appeared anxious, in the true spirit of a gentleman, to offer all the courtesies he consistently could. My baby caught the whooping-cough, and was ill almost unto death for some days with the fever which precedes the cough; and then she slowly declined. a — which General Steadman gave me leave to do immediately upon his accession to command — through the very kind intercession of General Brannen, who succeeded General Birge--I was informed by a gentleman, who said he had been told so authoritatively, that if I ever quitted the country for any possible object, I would — no matter <
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
nspicuous charge against him made by the Bureau of military Justice was, of being accessory to the assassination of President Lincoln. The letter implored Mr. Greeley to insist upon a speedy trial of her husband upon that charge, and upon all other supposed cruelties that were alleged he had inflicted. A public trial was prayed, that the accusations might be publicly met, and her husband vindicated. To this letter Mr. Greeley at once answered Mrs. Davis, and directed it to the care of General Birge, at Savannah. The morning of the next day Mr. Greeley came to my residence and placed Mrs. Davis's letter in my hand, saying that he could not believe the charge true. He asked me to become professionally interested in behalf of Mr. Davis. I told Mr. Greeley that, unless our Government was willing to have it inferred that Wirz was convicted and his sentence of death infected unjustly, it could not now overlook the superior ztho was, at least popularly, regarded as the moving cause of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
of the most disastrous campaigns of the war. From all we can learn, the enemy took up a position to oppose the Union troops at the crossing of Cane River. Franklin gave orders to attack the enemy early the following morning; but, suffering greatly from his wound, transferred the command to General Emory, who made the necessary disposition of the troops. In the morning the 1st division attacked the enemy directly in front, while the cavalry made a demonstration on the right, and General Birge with a picked force prepared to turn the enemy's left. After some sharp fighting General Emory carried the enemy's position with a loss of 400 men. In the meanwhile the enemy had attacked General A. J. Smith, who brought up the rear; but all their efforts were frustrated by the vigilance of that brave soldier, who administered a severe punishment to the enemy and took many prisoners. Before 1 P. M. the enemy had all been scattered. The Confederates having retreated, General Smi
4th Iowa A number of the captured or missing were also wounded.   9 9   28 28 15 221 236 273 Total First Brigade 3 36 39 7 136 143 35 641 676 858 Second Brigade.                     (1.) Brig. Gen. John McArthur (W'd).                     (2.) Col. Thomas Morton.                     Staff       1   1       1 9th Illinois 1 60 61 19 281 300 1 4 5 366 12th Illinois 2 20 22 5 71 76   3 3 101 81st Ohio 2 2 4   17 17   2 2 23 13th Missouri   10 10 3 67 70   1 1 81 Birge's Sharpshooters (14th Missouri)   2 2   6 6       8 Total Second Brigade 5 94 99 28 442 470 1 10 11 580 Third Brigade.                     (1.) Col. T. W. Sweeny (W'd).                     (2.) Col. S. D. Baldwin.                     8th Iowa A number of the captured or missing were also wounded. 1 29 30 4 68 72 18 361 379 481 7th Illinois 2 15 17 2 79 81   1 1 99 50th Illinois   12 12
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