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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 3 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 4: War. (search)
e of the Union, going so far as to say that he would be worth fifty thousand men to their cause. Probably it was due to Scott that Mr. Lincoln requested Mr. Francis Preston Blair to have an interview with Lee, and secure him by the tempting offer of the command of the active army of the United States. Neither the President nor hi, in a letter to the Honorable Reverdy Johnson, of Maryland, dated February 25, 1868, is found for the first time his account of this interview: After listening to Blair's remarks, writes Lee, I declined the offer he made me to take command of the army that was to be brought into the field, stating, as candidly and courteously as Id, that, though opposed to secession and deprecating war, I could take no part in an invasion of the Southern States. I went directly from the interview with Mr. Blair to the office of General Scott, told him of the proposition that had been made me, and my decision. After reflection upon returning home, I concluded that I oug
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
oned, 228. Beauregard, General P. G. T., mentioned, 48, 87, 107, 108, 110, III, 132, 137, 346; notice of, 100; promoted, 133, 134; at Petersburg, 360; sent against Sherman, 369. Beaver Dam Creek, 158, 160, 168. Beckwith, General, Amos, 103. Benedict, Colonel G. G., letter to, 299. Benjamin, Judah P., 324. Benton, Thomas H., 52. Berkeley, Sir, William, mentioned, 3, 4. Birney, General James G., mentioned, 247. Black Hawk, mentioned, 48. Blackburn's Ford, Va., 189. Blair, Francis P., mentioned, 85. Blenker, General, mentioned, 109. Bloody angle, the, Gettysburg, 335. Blucher, Field-Martial, 142, 422. Bohemia, the blind King of, 420. Bolivar Heights, 202. Boswell, Captain, killed at Chancellorsville, 251. Brackett, Captain Albert G., mentioned, 54. Bragg, General, Braxton, mentioned, 47, 54; re-enforced, 313; opposed to Schofield, 370. Branch, General L. O. B., killed at Antietam, 215. Breckinridge, General John C., mentioned, 83, 341, 369
Sherman to Atlanta. The Mississippi section was on the Red River expedition with Brigadier-General A. J. Smith and formed part of the detachment that fought at Nashville. It never rejoined the rest of the corps, which followed Sherman through Georgia and the Carolinas. On August 1, 1865, the corps was discontinued. Besides McPherson, it was commanded by Major-Generals F. P. Blair, Jr., J. A. Mower, Brigadier-Generals T. E. G. Ransom, M. D. Leggett, and W. W. Belknap. Major-General Francis Preston Blair, Jr., was born in Lexington, Kentucky, February 19, 1821, and became a lawyer and editor in St. Louis. He was a member of Congress for several years, and at the outbreak of the Civil War he was instrumental in saving Missouri to the Union. Entering the army as colonel, his commission of major-general of volunteers was dated November 29, 1862. He commanded a brigade on the Yazoo expedition, and afterward was division commander in the Fifteenth Army Corps, and headed it for a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, Francis Preston, 1791-1876 (search)
Blair, Francis Preston, 1791-1876 Statesman: born in Abingdon, Va., April 12, 1791 was originally a supporter of Henry Clay, but became an ardent Jackson man in consequence of the agitation over the Bank of the United States (q. c.), and at the suggestion of the President established The globe in Washington, D. C., which was the recognized organ of the Democratic party until 1845, when President Polk displaced him. The Spanish mission was offered to Mr. Blair by the President, but refused. but became an ardent Jackson man in consequence of the agitation over the Bank of the United States (q. c.), and at the suggestion of the President established The globe in Washington, D. C., which was the recognized organ of the Democratic party until 1845, when President Polk displaced him. The Spanish mission was offered to Mr. Blair by the President, but refused. In 1864 his efforts led to the unsatisfactory peace conference of Feb. 3, 1865. He died in Silver Spring, Md., Oct. 18., 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blair, Francis Preston, Jr., 1821-1875 (search)
Blair, Francis Preston, Jr., 1821-1875 Military officer; born in Lexington, Ky., Feb. 19, 1821 ; was educated at the College of New Jersey, and took an active part in politics early in life. The free-soil party (q. v.) at St. Louis elected him to a seat in Congress in 1856, and he acted and voted with the Republicans several years. He joined the Union army in 1861, and rose to the rank of major-general of volunteers. In 1864 he commanded a corps of Sherman's army in the campaign against Atlanta and in his march to the sea. Having joined the Democratic party, he was its unsuccessful candidate for the Vice,--Presidency in 1868. In January. 1871, he was chosen United States Senator. He died in St. Louis, Mo., July 8. 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hampton Roads conference. (search)
Hampton Roads conference. In January, 1865, Francis P. Blair twice visited Richmond, Va., to confer with Jefferson Davis. He believed that a suspension of hostilities, and an ultimate settlement by restoration of the Union, might be brought about, by the common desire, North and South, to enforce the Monroe doctrine against the French in Mexico. Out of Mr. Blair's visits grew a conference, held on a vessel in Hampton Roads, Feb. 3, 1865, between Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Seward on one side, and Messrs. A. H. Stephens, R. M. T. Hunter, and John A. Campbell on the other. It was informal, and no basis for negotiation was reached.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kitchen cabinet, (search)
Kitchen cabinet, An appellation in common use during the administration of President Jackson, of which Francis P. Blair and Amos Kendall were the recipients. Blair was the editor of The globe, the organ of the administration, and Kendall was one of its principal contributors. These two men were frequently consulted by the President as confidential advisers. To avoid observation when they called on him, they entered the President's dwelling by a back door. On this account the opposition party, who believed the advice of these two men caused Jackson to fill nearly all the offices with Democrats, after turning out the incumbents, called them in derision the kitchen cabinet.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
sJan. 31, 1885 Albert G. MorehouseactingDec. 28, 1887 David R. Francis (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1889 William J. Stone (Dem.)term beginsJan., 1893 Lou V. Stephensterm beginsJan., 1897 A. M. Dockeryterm beginsJan., 1901 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. David Barton17th to 21st1821 to 1831 Thomas H. Benton17th to 31st1821 to 1851 Alexander Buckner22d1831 to 1833 Lewis F. Linn23d to 27th1833 to 1843 David R. Atchison28th to 33d1843 to 1856 Henry S. Geyer32d to 34th1851 to 1857 James Stephen Green34th to 36th1857 to 1861 Trusten Polk35th to 37th1857 to 1862 Waldo P. Johnson37th1861 to 1862 John B. Henderson37th to 40th1862 to 1869 Robert Wilson37th1862 B. Gratz Brown38th to 39th1863 to 1867 Charles D. Drake40th to 41st1867 to 1870 Francis P. Blair, Jr41st to 42d1871 to 1873 Carl Schurz41st to 42d1869 to 1875 Lewis F. Bogy43d to 45th1873 to 1877 Francis M. Cockrell44th to—1875 to — David H. Armstrong45th1877 to 1879 George G. Vest46th to—187
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peace conference of 1864. (search)
Peace conference of 1864. Francis P. Blair, Sr., conceived the idea that through his personal acquaintance with most of the Confederate leaders at Richmond he might be able to effect a peace. So, without informing the President of his purpose, he asked Mr. Lincoln for a pass through the National lines to the Confederate capital. On Dec. 26, the President handed Mr. Blair a card on which was written, Allow Mr. F. P. Blair, Sr., to pass our lines to go South and return, and signed his name to it. This self-constituted peace commissioner went to Richmond, had several interviews with President Davis, and made his way back to Washington in January. 1865, with a letter written to himself by Jefferson Davis, in which the latter expressed a willingness to appoint a commission to renew the effort to enter into a conference with a view to secure peace to the two countries. This letter Mr. Blair placed in the hands of the President, when the latter wrote a note to Blair which he might s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
of the first guns salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike eld crushed guns that show what fire we took unflinchingly, while pouring canister alone upon their charging lines. Breckinridge thanks us on the field. To replace Blair, Vaught now stands promoted, and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have brought defeat. The Fifth, unmoved, indigna, their reward, their pride, from your gallant acts, your heroic bearing, your friendly approbation? Boys of the Fifth Company, the spirits of Slocomb, Vaught and Blair at this moment marshal our brave who roam enfranchised, and reecho my words, rejoicing at this first reunion of the Fifth and its brothers of Virginia. May God bl
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