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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. (search)
mith. Post of Chattanooga, Col. John G. Parkhurst: 44th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Simeon C. Aldrich; 15th Ky., Maj. William G. Halpin; 9th Mich., Lieut.-Col. William Wilkinson. army of the Tennessee, Maj.-Gen. William T. Sherman. General Sherman had under his immediate command the Eleventh Corps, and the Second Division, Fourteenth Corps of the Army of the Cumberland; the Second and Fourth Divisions, Fifteenth Corps, and the Second Division, Seventeenth Corps. Fifteenth Corps, Maj.-Gen. Frank P. Blair, Jr. First division, Brig.-Gen. Peter J. Osterhaus. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles R. Woods: 13th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Frederick W. Partridge .(w), Capt. Geo. P. Brown; 3d Mo., Lieut.-Col. Theodore Meumann; 12th Mo., Col. Hugo Wangelin (w), Lieut.-Col. Jacob Kaercher; 17th Mo., Lieut.-Col. John F. Cramer; 27th Mo., Col. Thomas Curly; 29th Mo., Col. James Peckham (w), Maj. Philip H. Murphy; 31st Mo., Lieut.-Col. Samuel P. Simpson; 32d Mo., Lieut.-Col. Henry C. Warmoth; 76th Ohio, M
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate strength in the Atlanta campaign. (search)
shows 569 deserters. The 1542 prisoners captured from Hood and Hardee, shown by increase of absent without leave in their corps, account for the remainder, without examining the returns of Polk's corps and the cavalry. General Johnston's army reached its maximum strength on the New Hope Church line, where he must have had 75,000 for battle when the armies faced each other May 27th. General Sherman's army For Sherman's strength on the New Hope line, see his return May 31st, and deduct Blair's Seventeenth Corps, which did not join the army until June 8th. there numbered, of all arms, for duty, 93,600 men, and several brigades of this force were employed in guarding trains and watching roads in all directions, for Sherman's army had no rear. Odds of less than five to four against him is the great inequality of force which General Johnston complains compelled him to employ dismounted cavalry in holding this line. In a foot-note [p. 274] General Johnston says: I have two re
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
o Second Division, Fourteenth Corps, Aug. 20th), Maj. Joel O. Martin; 32d Wis., Lieut.-Col. Charles H. De Groat. Artillery, Capt. Jerome B. Burrows, Capt. George Robinson: C, 1st Mich., Capt. George Robinson, Lieut. Henry Shier; 14th Ohio, Capt. J. B. Burrows, Lieut. Seth M. Laird, Lieut. George Hurlbut; F, 2d U. S., Lieut. Albert M. Murray, Lieut. Joseph C. Breckinridge, Lieut. Lemuel Smith, Lieut. Rezin G. Howell. Seventeenth Army Corps (joined the army in Georgia June 8th), Maj.-Gen. Frank P. Blair, Jr. Escort: M, 1st Ohio Cav. (relieved June 18th), Lieut. Charles H. Shultz; G, 9th Ill., Mounted Inf. (relieved July 24th), Capt. Isaac Clements; G, 11th Ill. Cav. (assigned Aug. 11th from escort of Fourth Division), Capt. Stephen S. Tripp. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Mortimer D. Leggett, Brig.-Gen. Charles R. Woods. Escort: D, 1st Ohio Cav. (relieved June 18th), Lieut. James W. Kirkendall. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force, Col. George E. Bryant: 20th Ill., Lieut.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
enemy, made epaulements for batteries there, and little by little extended our deep ditches or log-barricades close up to Johnston's. As we settled down to steady work again, McPherson was near Brush Mountain, having pushed down the railroad. F. P. Blair's corps (the Seventeenth) from Huntsville, Alabama, had now joined him, making up for our losses, which were already, from all causes, upward of nine thousand. This accession gave heart to us all. Thomas was next, advancing and bearing away tmand the Twentieth Corps. Palmer, having a controversy concerning his seniority, left the Fourteenth Corps, and Jeff. C. Davis took his place. Hazen passed from a brigade in the Fourth (Stanley's) to M. L. Smith's division of Logan's corps. F. P. Blair, in a report, condensed the work of his corps in these The battle of Ezra Church, July 28, 1864. from a sketch made at the time. words: The command was occupied for 28 days in making approaches, digging rifle-pits, and erecting batteries,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
under the circumstances was almost useless. The great guns of the Osage were loaded with grape and canister, and, when these were exhausted, with shrapnel having fuses cut to one second. Our fire was reserved till the heads of the enemy were seen just above the bank, when both guns were fired. Everything that was made of wood on the Osage and Black Hawk was pierced with bullets. Upon the iron shield in the pilot-house of the latter were the marks of sixty bullets, a proof The fight at Blair's plantation. From a War-time sketch. of the hotness of the fire. This unequal contest could not continue long, and after an hour and a half the enemy retreated with a loss of over four hundred killed and wounded, as afterward ascertained. Among the former was General Thomas Green, their foremost partisan fighter west of the Mississippi. Of this action Admiral Porter, in his Naval history of the civil War, writes as follows: Selfridge conducted this affair in the handsomest manner, in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's advance from Atlanta. (search)
re till there is no reply, 7 I said. He did so. A half mile above he was able to send over among the cypresses a brigade in boats. The Confederate division gave way and fled. Then shortly our bridge was laid on the main road and we marched on. Blair, who had returned from his furlough before we left Atlanta, crossed and kept the left bank of the Ogeechee, and Sherman usually accompanied him. Blair's knowledge and hospitality attracted him. So the armies went on meeting an increased resistancBlair's knowledge and hospitality attracted him. So the armies went on meeting an increased resistance, but were not much delayed till we got to the Savannah Canal. Captain Duncan from my cavalry escort had carried Sherman's messages down the Ogeechee in a boat past Confederate guards and topedoes, and gone out to sea. He was picked up by a United States vessel and his message taken to the admiral. Hence navy and provision ships were waiting off the headlands, uncertain just where Sherman would secure a harbor. Owing to swamps and obstructed roads and Hardee's force behind them, we could
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
a large quantity of very old wine of the Sherman's soldiers guarding the Palmetto monument, Columbia. From a sketch made at the time. best quality, which had been kept in the cellars of Charleston many years, with no thought on the part of the owners that in its old age it would be drunk from tin cups by Yankee soldiers. Fortunately for the whole army the wine was discovered by the Seventeenth Corps and fell into the hands of the generous and chivalrous commander of that corps,--General Frank P. Blair,--who distributed it with the spirit of liberality and fairness characteristic of him. On the 6th we moved toward Fayetteville, where we arrived on the 10th. The march through South Carolina had been greatly delayed by the almost incessant rains and the swampy nature of the country. More than half the way we were compelled to corduroy the roads before our trains could be moved. To accomplish this work we had been supplied with axes, and the country was covered with saplings well s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
rsh, Lieut.-Col. Joseph M. Griffith. Unassigned: 110th U. S. C. T., Maj. William C. Hawley, Capt. Thomas Kennedy, Capt. Zac. C. Wilson, Capt. Jacob Kemnitzer. artillery, Lieut.-Col. William H. Ross: II, 1st Ill., Capt. Francis DeGress, Lieut. Robert S. Gray; B, 1st Mich., Lieut. Edward B. Wright; H, 1st Mo., Capt. Charles M. Callahan; 12th Wis., Capt. William Zickerick. Unassigned: 29th Mo. (mounted), Maj. Christian Burkhardt, Col. Joseph S. Gage. Seventeenth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Frank P. Blair, Jr. Escort: G, 11th Ill. Cav., Capt. Stephen S. Tripp. first division, Maj.-Gen. Joseph A. Mower, Brig.-Gen. Manning F. Force. First Brigade, Col. Charles S. Sheldon, Brig.-Gen. John W. Fuller: 64th Ill., Maj. Joseph S. Reynolds; 18th Mo., Lieut.-Col. William H. Minter, Col. Charles S. Sheldon, Lieut.-Col. William H. Minter, Maj. William M. Edgar; 27th Ohio, Maj. Isaac N. Gilruth; 39th Ohio, Capt. John W. Orr, Lieut.-Col. Daniel Weber. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John W. Spragu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.113 (search)
in the necessary authority, and to carry out the above programme. W. T. Sherman, Major-General, Commanding Army of the United States in North Carolina. J. E. Johnston, General, Commanding Confederate States Army in North Carolina. The condition was that it should first be approved by the President. Pending these negotiations, and after the proposed terms had been made known to the leading officers of Sherman's army, I conversed with nearly all these officers, among them Logan, Howard, and Blair, and heard no word of dissent from any of them. I can now recall to mind but one general officer who, at the time, questioned the wisdom of General Sherman's action, and that was General Carl Schurz. General Schurz was then serving temporarily as my chief-of-staff, and when I returned from Sherman's headquarters about 12. o'clock on the night of the 18th I found General Schurz sitting up, waiting for me. He was eager to learn the terms, and when I stated them to him he expressed regret and
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
ed in the presence of an overpowering enemy, spiked his guns and burned his gun-carriages, and moved, with his garrison, from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, and thus committed an act of hostility, the President heard of the movement with chagrin and mortification. It is the deliberate conviction of Joseph Holt, the loyal Secretary of War during the last seventy days of Mr. Buchanan's administration, that no such pledge was ever given. See his reply to allegations in a speech of ex-Postmaster-General Blair, at Clarkesville, Maryland, in August, 1865. It is fair to conclude that men like the Commissioners from South Carolina, and Jacob Thompson, all engaged in the commission of the highest crime known, namely, treason to their Government, would not be slow in the use of the more venal and common sin of making false accusations, especially when such accusations might furnish some excuse for their iniquity. No proof has ever been given that the President violated his oath by making s
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