Your search returned 26 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
Doc. 12. correspondence with the South. post office Deparrment, August 26, 1861. The President of the United States directs that his proclamation of the 16th instant, interdicting commercial intercourse with the so-called Confederate States, shall be applied to correspondence with these States, and has devolved upon this Department the enforcement of so much of its interdict as relates to such correspondence. The officers and agents of this Department will, therefore, without further instructions, lose no time in putting an end to written intercourse with these States, by causing the arrest of any express agent or other persons, who shall, after the promulgation of this order, receive letters to be carried to or from these States, and will seize all such letters and forward them to this Department. M. Blair, Postmaster-General.
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 7: Missouri. April and May, 1861. (search)
ght of Saturday, April 6th, I received the following dispatch: Washington, April 6, 1861. Major W. T. Sherman: Will you accept the chief clerkship of the War Department? We will make you assistant Secretary of War when Congress meets. M. Blair, Postmaster-General. To which I replied by telegraph, Monday morning, I cannot accept; and by mail as follows: office St. Louis railroad Company, Monday, April 8, 1861. Hon. M. Blair, Washington, D. C.: I received, about nine o'cloHon. M. Blair, Washington, D. C.: I received, about nine o'clock Saturday night, your telegraph dispatch, which I have this moment answered, I cannot accept. I have quite a large family, and when I resigned my place in Louisiana, on account of secession, I had no time to lose; and, therefore, after my hasty visit to Washington, where I saw no chance of employment, I came to St. Louis, have accepted a place in this company, have rented a house, and incurred other obligations, so that I am not at liberty to change. I thank you for the compliment conta
at, D. 96 Berry, Jesse H., poem by, P. 104 Berry, Michael, Captain; how he escaped from the South, P. 139 Bethune, George W., D. D., D. 38, 54, Doc. 119, P. 45 Betts, S. R., Doc. 135 Bigler, —, Senator, D. 28; P. 8 Binghamton, N. Y., Union meeting at, 33 Bininger, A. M., D. 39 Binney, Horace, Doc. 178 Birdseye, J. C., of California, D. 38 Black Republic, South Carolina to be a, P. 10 Black, —, Gov. of Nebraska, D. 52 Blair, M., Postmaster--general, stops the mails between St. Louis and Memphis, D. 70 notice of, D. 76; suspends all mail service in the seceded States, D. 82 Blair, F. P., Doc. 363; D. 102 Blankman, Edmond, speech at Union meeting, N. Y., Doc. 118 Blenker, Louis, Colonel, Doc. 296 Bliss, L. W., acting Governor of Jefferson Territory; his proclamation of May 21, D. 90; Doc. 325 Blockade, the Federal, proclaimed, D. 32, 46, 48, 62, 73, 82; Southern opinion of the, D. 75; debate on the,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Semmes' Georgia Brigade. (search)
Private S. Barton, G. W. Bowen, Levi Bridges, H. L. Cousey, B. W. Forrest, Private E. D. Harrall, G. W. Harrell, John A. Jorden, Thomas Lindsey, Irwin Nesbet, Samuel Nesbet, J. Mercer. Co. G. Corporal G. Colley, Private J. C. Agee, W. B. Armmer, Corporal E. A. Booker, Private D. B. Conner, J. Hanson, Private G. W. Hopkins, J. E. Lunceford, J. Shont, G. B. Smith, A. Wolf. Co. H. Private E. L. Bacon, R. H. Lynn, W. B. Arwell, R. Burket, W. Booth, Private M. Blair, J. A. Defow, J. B. Boyton, C. Rainy, W. Williams. Co. K. Sergeant H. R. Sharp, J. Muters, Private H. H. Blalock, Private H. Sikes, H. H. Sharp. [81] I certify, on honor, that of the above number of men there were present, actually armed and in line of battle, forty-nine enlisted men on the morning of the ninth (9th) instant, the day of the surrender of this army. W. B. Jones, Col. Commanding Regiment. Twelfth Georgia Battalion. Field, Staff and Band. Sergeant-
Blackwood, Dr. VII., 216. Blackwood's magazine, I., 90. Blacque Bey X., 4. Blair, C. W., III., 117. Blair, F. P., Jr. : I., 353 seq.; II., 185; III., 118, 132, 345; VIII., 102; X., 224. Blair, J., I., 14. Blair, M., X., 12. Blair's Landing, La., II., 352. Blair's plantation, La., VI., 320. Blaine, J. G., IX., 292. Blake, G. A. H., IV., 47. Blake, H. C., VI., 316. Blake's Mill, Ga., IV., 332. Blakely guns V., 56Blair's plantation, La., VI., 320. Blaine, J. G., IX., 292. Blake, G. A. H., IV., 47. Blake, H. C., VI., 316. Blake's Mill, Ga., IV., 332. Blakely guns V., 56, 120. Blanchard, A. G., X., 271. Bledsoe's battery, Confederate, I., 350, 352, 356, 358. Blemiel, Father Vii., 272. Blenheim, losses at, X., 140. Blenker, L., I., 311; V., 292. Blennerhasset Island, O., II., 340. Block houses: on Nashville & Chattanooga R. R., IV., 149; garrisoned against Wheeler's cavalry, IV., 151. Blockade: I., 89; the early inadequacy of, VI., 14; Confederate hope of raising, VI., 15; beginning at Pensacola, VI., 19; steam vessels
" Mr. Seward replied "that the people should not be disappointed, and that he thought they would be well satisfied with what would take place in a very few days." It is added in the Courier and Enquirer that "Mr. Moses spent Sunday evening with Mr. Blair, Postmaster General," and says, "he gave me the programme of the Government, which I think will be effective. Troops will, in all probability, be sent to New Orleans. Mr. Blair thinks the war will be short, but it will be spirited and energetl," and says, "he gave me the programme of the Government, which I think will be effective. Troops will, in all probability, be sent to New Orleans. Mr. Blair thinks the war will be short, but it will be spirited and energetic." The above, when taken in connection with Mr. Seward's letter to Mr. Dayton, which we considered a notification to all Europe of the intention of the Federal Government, will show that the "Premier" is active in all the designs and purposes in reference to the South.
House of Representatives: The President of the United States was lest evening plunged into affiliation by the death of a beloved child. The Heads of Departments, in consideration of this distressing event, have thought it would be agreeable to Congress and the American people that the official and private buildings occupied by them should not be illuminated on the evening of the 22d inst. William H. Seward. S. P. Chase E. M. Stanton, Gidson Welles, Edward Bates, M. Blair. Washington, Feb. 21, 1862. A joint resolution was consequently adopted by the House, in accordance with this request, and the orders for illuminating the various public buildings were countermanded. The Senate will probably adopt, the joint resolution to morrow, before proceeding to the hall of the House of Representatives to participate in the ceremonies. Flag, fireworks, Chinese lanterns, and transparencies, hundreds of which had been prepared for private as well as public illu
The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1862., [Electronic resource], The opinion of the Northern press on Lincoln's proclamation. (search)
What, therefore, must be thought of the judgment, the prudence, or the patriotism of the doctrinaire who proclaim to all the world, in advance, that Philadelphia contains thirty thousand to forty thousand Secessionists, or, in other words, that half her voting population "desire the success of the rebellion?" The Cincinnati Inquirer, of Monday, "makes a point," as follows: The most astonishing thing in the world is, that while four members of Mr. Lincoln's Cabinet--Messrs. Seward, Blair, Smith, and Bates--were utterly opposed to his proclamation of emancipation, the Abolitionists have the audacity to denounce as 'traitors' (as some of them do) all who cannot conscientiously endorse that proclamation. The same paper notices what it calls "patent secession," to wit: "Vallandigham's Secession plan was in the form of a joint resolution proposing amendments to the Constitution."--Gazette. To propose amendments to a code of organic law which is to be over the whole,
Burglary. --The store of M. Blair & Co., corner of Cary and 12th streets, was entered sometime during Monday night by thieves, who succeeded in carrying off twelve barrels of flour and other articles of considerable value.
gro hands employed there, and conveyed them to the cage, as principals. The officers engaged in ferreting out the robbery were Messrs. Pleasants, Boze and Brook of the night, and Davis, of the day police. On the same night the store of Messrs. M. Blair & Co, corner of 12th and Main streets, was entered by experienced robbers, with a steel "limmy," at the door on 12th street. The robbers, in this instance, left their "jimmy," and contented themselves with marching off with a box of soap the On the same night the store of Messrs. M. Blair & Co, corner of 12th and Main streets, was entered by experienced robbers, with a steel "limmy," at the door on 12th street. The robbers, in this instance, left their "jimmy," and contented themselves with marching off with a box of soap the only article missed yesterday. They were no doubt frightened by outside noises. This is the second time Blair & Co have been robbed, having, on the first occasion, been despoiled of a large lot of flour.
1 2