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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, V. August, 1861 (search)
tures, broke the statues, and made kindling wood of the piano, sofas, etc. August 10 Mr. Benjamin is a frequent visitor at the department, and is very sociable: some intimations have been thrown out that he aspires to become, some day, Secretary of War. Mr. Benjamin, unquestionably, will have great influence with the President, for he has studied his character most carefully. He will be familiar not only with his likes, but especially with his dislikes. It is said the means used by Mr. Blair to hold Gen. Jackson, consisted not so much in a facility of attaching strong men to him as his friends, but in aiming fatal blows at the great. leaders who had incurred the enmity of the President. Thus Calhoun was incessantly pursued. August 11 There is a whisper that something like a rupture has occurred between the President and Gen. Beauregard; and I am amazed to learn that Mr. Benjamin is inimical to Gen. B. I know nothing of the foundation for the report; but it is said that
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXX. September, 1863 (search)
agg's army; but from abroad we learn that the British Government has prevented the rams built for us from leaving the Mersey. Gen. Pemberton is here, and was closeted for several hours today with the Secretary of War. Capt. J. H. Wright, 56th Georgia, gives another version of the surrender of Cumberland Gap. He is the friend of Gen. Frazer, and says he was induced to that step by the fear that the North Carolina regiments (62d and 63d) could not be relied on. Did he try them? A Mr. Blair, Columbus, Miss., applies for permission to bring drugs from Memphis, and refers, for respectability, to President Davis and Gov. Letcher. His letter gives a list of prices of medicines in the Confederate States. I select the following: Quinine, per oz., $100; calomel, $20; blue mass, $20; Opiun, $100; S. N. bismuth, $100; soda, $5; borax, $14; oil of bergamot, per lb., $100; indigo, $35; blue-stone, $10. Boots are selling in this city at $100 per pair, and common shoes for $60. Shu
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 47 (search)
an, with inadequate forces, and may again be responsible for additional calamities. Old Mr. F. P. Blair and his son Montgomery Blair are on their way here, with authority to confer on peace and sust be impressed too. I am assured by one of the President's special detectives that Francis P. Blair, Sr. is truly in this city. What for? A rumor spreads that Richmond is to be evacuated. nt cannot feed, sufficiently, the men already in the field. Everybody is conjecturing what Mr. Blair has proposed; but no one expects relief from his mission, if indeed he be clothed with diplomany orders preventing carts from coming to market. Flour is $1000 per barrel to-day! F. P. Blair, Sr., has been here several days, the guest of Mr. Ould, agent of exchange. He left this mornint of our calamities may be traced to these two sources. January 23 Foggy, and raining. F. P. Blair is here again. If enemies are permitted to exist in the political edifice, there is danger o