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incredible, when the weight of the enemy's column and the length of the battle are considered. The enemy seemed to stake the issue of the day on turning shall our flank on the left. It was then that Johnston, after having baffled Patterson, as Blucher baffled Grouchy, did more than was done by Blucher at Waterloo. The centre led by Davis, the right commanded by Beauregard, did the rest. The enemy was exhausted, appalled, tumultuously routed by the inflexible resistance, the deadly fire, theBlucher at Waterloo. The centre led by Davis, the right commanded by Beauregard, did the rest. The enemy was exhausted, appalled, tumultuously routed by the inflexible resistance, the deadly fire, the terrible charges with which their attack was met. And yet but a small portion of our forces at and near Manassas Junction were actually engaged. Perhaps there were at no time as many as twenty thousand of them under fire or in sight of the enemy, while it is possible that double that number of the enemy's total army of about seventy thousand were brought into action. It is rumored, and believed by many persons, that General Patterson and General Scott were on the field of battle. But neith
lay out ample work for scores of his professional brethren on the other side of the fight. Remember the situation. It was half-past 4 o'clock--perhaps a quarter later still. Every division of our army on the field had been repulsed. The enemy were in the camps of four out of five of them. We were driven to within little over half a mile of the Landing. Behind us was a deep, rapid river. Before us was a victorious enemy. And still there was an hour for fighting. Oh! That night or Blucher would come! Oh! that night or Lew. Wallace would come! Nelson's division of Gen. Buell's army evidently couldn't cross in time to do us much good. We didn't yet know why Lew. Wallace wasn't on the ground. In the justice of a righteous cause, and in that semi-circle of twenty-two guns in position, lay all the hope we could see. Suddenly a broad, sulphurous flash of light leaped out from the darkening woods; and through the glare and smoke came whistling the leaden hail. The rebels we
, the greater part of the battle was fought by the rank and file on their own hook. We have four confederate generals in this quarter, but not one was in command. To the rank and file, then, be the glory given of having achieved one of the most brilliant successes of the war. If the confederate government is looking for material for more brigadier-generals, let promotion fall upon the lionhearted Col. Lamar, who defended the intrenchments, and the gallant and chivalrous McEnery, who, like Blucher, came into the field just in the nick of time. Since the battle, the enemy have been intrenching themselves silently at the lower end of James Island. As their plan of assault has proved impracticable, it is presumed they will be contented hereafter to advance by regular approaches — that is, if they are permitted to do so. Prisoners state that there are nine Federal regiments on the island, and that Gen. Isaac I. Stevens, of Oregon, (the chairman of the Breckinridge National Committee
Part 2. the simultaneous movements Henry W. Elson Drewry's bluff impregnable In battery Dantzler--Confederate gun commanding the river after Butler's repulse on land Butler's failed attempt to take Petersburg. Charles Francis Adams, who, as a cavalry officer, served in Butler's campaign, compares Grant's maneuvers of 1864 to Napoleon's of 1815. While Napoleon advanced upon Wellington it was essential that Grouchy should detain Blucher. So Butler was to eliminate Beauregard while Grant struck at Lee. With forty thousand men, he was ordered to land at Bermuda Hundred, seize and hold City Point as a future army base, and advance upon Richmond by way of Petersburg, while Grant meanwhile engaged Lee farther north. Arriving at Broadway Landing, seen in the lower picture, Butler put his army over the Appomattox on pontoons, occupied City Point, May 4th, and advanced within three miles of Petersburg, May 9th. The city might have been easily taken by a vigorous
Drewry's bluff impregnable In battery Dantzler--Confederate gun commanding the river after Butler's repulse on land Butler's failed attempt to take Petersburg. Charles Francis Adams, who, as a cavalry officer, served in Butler's campaign, compares Grant's maneuvers of 1864 to Napoleon's of 1815. While Napoleon advanced upon Wellington it was essential that Grouchy should detain Blucher. So Butler was to eliminate Beauregard while Grant struck at Lee. With forty thousand men, he was ordered to land at Bermuda Hundred, seize and hold City Point as a future army base, and advance upon Richmond by way of Petersburg, while Grant meanwhile engaged Lee farther north. Arriving at Broadway Landing, seen in the lower picture, Butler put his army over the Appomattox on pontoons, occupied City Point, May 4th, and advanced within three miles of Petersburg, May 9th. The city might have been easily taken by a vigorous move, but Butler delayed until Beauregard arrived with a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The concentration before Shiloh-reply to Captain Polk. (search)
is, who was responsible for the delay on the 5th day of April, 1862, in the formation of the line of battle on the field of Shiloh, which prevented an attack on the enemy on that day. Correlatively this involves, also, the emphatic inference that such delay precluded, for the want of time, a completed victory before General Buell's corps arrived on the field on Sunday evening, the 6th of April, 1862. Field-Marshal Grouchy arrived upon the battle field of Warterloo too late to defeat General Blucher! The orders of General Bragg were explicit and were executed with promptitude and fidelity. My troops needed no apology and their surviving commander offers none — but he scorns any attempt to defame him or them. Colonel Johnston has, during two years past, had ample time to have consulted authorities, and to have expunged this error from his book; but, as I am not advised that he has done so, I am constrained to appeal to the great tribunal of public opinion. Captain Polk havin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of First Maryland regiment. (search)
the enemy was gone. With only two companies of bayonets the regiment had charged the heart of a brigade and their short rifles had cloven it in two. Where the Yankee line had stood lay the dead and dying, but the brigade of General Wilcox was scattered to the winds. Captain Edelin captured a flag from the First Michigan, but they made no further stand that day. Colonel Elzey pursued them rapidly, flanking the Henry House, when General Beauregard rode up to him saying, Hail, Elzey! Thou Blucher of the day. Thence the brigade followed them beyond the Stone bridge, half way to Cub Run. Here it halted, and about sundown was ordered back to Camp Walker, near Union Mills Ford, reaching there at midnight. Thus these green soldiers, fresh from home, had in three days marched nearly eighty miles on one day's rations, with only six hours sleep, fought a battle and won a victory. President Davis, next morning, sent Colonel Elzey his promotion as Brigadier. He said going into battle to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
s. They ran all the way back, and got up in time for the fight at Front Royal. All were up that night. New life was infused into the mass, and the men sprang forward with that quick elastic step for which they were noted, and which Kirby Smith and Whiting used to say was more like the French than anything they had ever seen. The whole column halted to let us pass. The Louisiana brigade presented arms, and the men seemed to tread on air as they swung along. The glorious old Fourth, and Blucher, the whole army, cheered enthusiastically. There they go I look at them, was the universal cry, as, not two hundred and fifty strong, they tramped at quick time through column after and took the front. General Steuart, who had also been assigned a cavalry brigade, was ahead, and about 1 o'clock we came in sight of the enemy's pickets. The sentinel on post, in a red shirt, was taking his ease at full length under a rail shelter. The group of horsemen, Generals Ewell, Taylor and Steuart
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
triumphal arches that were to have been erected. June 14. I forgot to mention in yesterday's letter, that Governor Henderson, with about five hundred mounted Texans, reached here and the Governor paid his respects to the General. I was much pleased with his appearance. You know he married in Paris, Miss Coxe, the niece of Dr. Hewson. He had in his cortege Dr. Ashbell Smith, the great Texan diplomat. Among others whom he brought with him, I was much interested in a young German, Count Blucher, the nephew of the old Field Marshall, who was an editor of a paper (radical) in Berlin, but owing to some articles which met with the disapprobation of the King, he was obliged to fly the country, and in his wanderings found his way to Texas, and came here to see the fighting. He is about thirty years of age, of mild and gentle appearance, an excellent French and Spanish scholar, and said to be, by a gentleman who met him in New Orleans last winter, one of the ripest classical scholars
Biddle, Will, I, 279. Biddies, I, 9. Bigelow, John, II, 80, 85, 88. Bingham, Major, II, 108. Binney, Horace, I, 316. Birney, David B., I, 362, 363, 385; II, 56, 59, 73, 77-79, 84, 86, 95, 127, 128, 130, 176,188-190,209,215, 235, 326-328, 333, 339, 399, 409, 410, 417. Birney, Mrs. David B., II, 235. Blair, Austin, I, 216. Blair, Montgomery, I, 12, 381. Blake, J. E., I, 51, 81, 144. Bliss, W. S., I, 131. Bliss, Z. R., II, 266, 349. Blount, II, 163. Blucher, Count, I, 105. Bohlen, Henry, I, 191; II, 306. Bond, Mr., II, 190. Bories, I, 9, 48. Botts, Jno. Minor, II, 150. Bourtakoff, Capt., II, 161. Bowen, Edward R., II, 164. Bragg, Braxton, I, 196; II, 136, 148, 151, 154, 201. Branch, Gen., I, 287-289, 294. Brewster, Wm. R., II, 83. Bristoe, Va., Campaign, Oct., 1863, II, 153-155, 163, 198, 369-371. Brockenborough, J. M., II, 47, 49, 52. Brooke, Gen., II, 86. Brooks, Gen., I, 228, 341. Brooks, Gen., II, 309
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