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Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 17: heresy and witchcraft. (search)
law of armes he ought to dy and reason good shoud yeald Unwise art thou against the streame to strive For in thy enterprise thouart not like to thrive Thy forces are to weake thou art not like to conquer For with a power thou hast ingagd that will thy forces scatter Of him thats wise thou counsell didst not take Thy teachers like unto thyself Ime sorry for thy sake Though of Christianity profession thou dost make And yet thy neighbor doest oppress only for conscience sake Tho art as blind as Bonner was that burnt the martyrs at the stake To the proud belongs the fall he surely shall comm downe Out of his throne be brought he shall mans pride must come to th ground Abomminable if be his deed soe in the end heas like to speed Dread belongs to the evell Almighty God will recompence Fifteen more lines were written; but they are so mutilated as to be illegible. From Cambridge Prison March 3, 1677. Benanuell Bower. I do attest that on ye5th of March last Elizabeth ye wife of B
Justice of the Sup. Court in Nova Scotia, and d. Oct. 1842, having lived more than half a year beyond a full century. Bonner, John, came here from Boston about 1690. By second w. Mary Clark, who d. here 20 April 1697, he had Jane, b. 2 May 1691,d several children; a son and a daughter only surviving. Bost. News Letter. A plan of Boston and the harbor, drawn by Capt. Bonner, was published in 1722, and has recently been republished. Boone, Matthew, by w. Anna, had Frank, b. 28 Mar. 1664. May 1655, d. young; Timothy, b. 1657; Samuel, bap. 6 Nov. 1659; Abigail, b. 7 Ap. 1662; Mary, b. 6 Mar. 1664-5, m. (Capt John Bonner before 1687, and d. 20 Ap. 1697; John, b. 7 Aug. 1674, d. 15 Oct. 1675; John, b. 3 Nov. 1675, d. 7 Mar. 1676; Nathan. Susanna d. prob. 1820; administration on her estate was granted 10 Jan. 1821. 32. James, s. of James (22), m. Grace Bonner of Springfield, and had Elizabeth, who m. Thomas Wallace 10 Oct. 1800. James the f. was a tin-plate worker, res. on the
1735. One of their sons was Samson Salter Blowers, b. 10 Mar. 1741-2, grad. H. C. 1763, m. a dau. of, Benjamin Kent, was Ch. Justice of the Sup. Court in Nova Scotia, and d. Oct. 1842, having lived more than half a year beyond a full century. Bonner, John, came here from Boston about 1690. By second w. Mary Clark, who d. here 20 April 1697, he had Jane, b. 2 May 1691, m. John Ellery of Boston, 31–Aug. 1710; John, b. 6 Dec. 1693, m. Sarah, dau. of Samuel Marsh, 17 Nov. 1715; Thomas, b. 6 Janfaithfulness discharged his trust. . . . By his second wife, who was a daughter of the famous Elder Clark of Cambridge, he had several children; a son and a daughter only surviving. Bost. News Letter. A plan of Boston and the harbor, drawn by Capt. Bonner, was published in 1722, and has recently been republished. Boone, Matthew, by w. Anna, had Frank, b. 28 Mar. 1664. Bordman, William (now generally written Boardman), by w. Frances, had Moses, d. 16 Mar. 1661-2, owning real estate, and th
eral wives he had seventeen children, as follows: Thomas, b. 2 Dec. 1642, d. 20 May 1649; Sarah, b. 15 Sept. 1644, m. Samuel Green, the veteran printer, 23 Feb. 1662-3, and was living in 1705; Jonas, b. 4 Sept. 1646; Mary, b. prob. 1648, d. 15 Nov. 1649; Elizabeth, b. prob. 1651, m. (1) Mr. John Woodmancy 23 July 1672, and (2)——Monk; Thomas, b. 2 Mar. 1652-3; John, b. 30 May 1655, d. young; Timothy, b. 1657; Samuel, bap. 6 Nov. 1659; Abigail, b. 7 Ap. 1662; Mary, b. 6 Mar. 1664-5, m. (Capt John Bonner before 1687, and d. 20 Ap. 1697; John, b. 7 Aug. 1674, d. 15 Oct. 1675; John, b. 3 Nov. 1675, d. 7 Mar. 1676; Nathaniel, b. 27 Oct. 1677, d. 15 June 1686; Joseph, b. 5 May 1679, living in 1705; Hannah, b. and d. Dec. 1680; Susanna, b. 20 Oct. 1682, m. Ebenezer Hancock 14 Jan. 1702. Jonas the f. was ordained Ruling Elder of the Church 15 Nov. 1682. His associate, Elder John Stone, ordained at the same time, died within a year afterwards, and Elder Clark held the office alone until 14 J<
t., and d. 23 Jan. 1814, a. nearly 54. 31. James, s. of Joseph (18), m. Susanna Dutton 3 Dec. 1776, and hall Susanna, b. 8 Sept. 1777: Patty., b. 5 Jan. 1780; in the division of the estate, 1819, two other children are named,—James, and Anna, w. of Eben Cutter. James the f. res. on the westerly corner of North Avenue and Tannery Street. He d. 7 Aug. 1818, a. 65; his w. Susanna d. prob. 1820; administration on her estate was granted 10 Jan. 1821. 32. James, s. of James (22), m. Grace Bonner of Springfield, and had Elizabeth, who m. Thomas Wallace 10 Oct. 1800. James the f. was a tin-plate worker, res. on the southerly part of the homestead, and d. 13 Nov. 1825; his w. Grace d. 14 June 1803, a. 42. 33. David, s. of James (22), m. Elizabeth Allen 8 May 1777, and had David, b. 6 Sept. 1777, d. of dropsy 7 Mar. 1816; James, b. 13 Feb. 1780, a carpenter, d. on his passage from the West Indies 25 July 1812; John, b. 4 Feb. 1782, d. young; Betsey Roby, b. 17 Aug. 1784, m. Jonathan
Benjamin, 11, 20, 1, 32, 239, 459. Bennett, 35, 327. Bernard, 143, 405, 6. Besbeech, 35. Besse, 347. Bethune, 310. Betts, 35, 59, 260. Bidwell, 331. Bigelow, 187, 326. Biglow, 208, 310. Binney, 320. Bird, 310, 36. Bishop, 346-52. Blake, 177, 321. Blanchard, 426. Bland, 332. Blaney, 426. Blathwait, 77. Bliss, 328, 438. Blodgett, 35, 58, 317. Blood, 62. Blowers, 35, 135, 288. Blumfield, 35. Bond, 4, 226, 310, 403. 18, 19. Bonner, 350. Bontecou, 321. Boone, 76. Boradell, 258. Bordman, 44, 5, 59, 75, 124, 5, 32, 3, 42, 75, 6, 9, 82, 4, 212-14, 27, 31, 3, 84, 92, 7, 374. Borland, 168-70, 417. Bosworth. 11, 32. Bourn, 218, 87. Bowen, 218, 26. Bowers, 59, 230, 345-7. Bowes, 294. Bowler, 321. Bowles, 317. Bowman, 58, 297, 305, 410. Bowtell, 59, 75. Boyer, 320. Boylston, 128. Bradish, 35, 59, 161, 225, 8, 92, 7, 305, 426, 8. Bradlee, 334. Bradshaw, 58, 75. Bradstree
Shepard. Swan. Winship. Blackleach, 488. Blodgett, 489. Eggleden. Reed. Tompson. Bloomfield, 489. Stedman. Bloss, 489. Blois. Blowers, 489. Belcher. Hill. Kent. Salter. Symmes. Woodbury. Bonner, 489, 90. Clark. Ellery. Marsh. Boone, 490. Bordman, 490-3. Bosworth. Bricksey. Brown. Bull. Colson. Cooper. Danforth. Daye. Dockum. Dorr. Emery. Epes. Farwell. Fillebrown. Goddard. Hnap. Dill. Falshaw. Fessenden. Gardner. Goodale. Hill. Mullis. Parker. Robbins. Stedman. Chesholme, 509. Shepard. Chester, 510. Hooker. Russell. Sprague. Whiting. Clark, 510, 11. Andrew. Bonner. Champney. Collis. Cook. Danforth. Fiske. Gibbs. Green. Hancock. Hastings. Heath. Hill. Lamson. Romer. Stone. Tyng. Winship. Woodmancy. Clement, 511. Hudson. Taylor. Colby, 511. Cro
Became a State by itself, June 19, 1819 Political troubles, a world wide theme, 1880 Mall, Paddock's on Tremont, north of Park street, about 1760 A row of elm trees planted there, 1762 To be paved with cobble-stones, 1823 A vote to cut the trees down not executed, May 16, 1860 The old elms removed by the City, Mar. 2, 1874 Manufactory-house set apart for the use of schools, 1731 John Brown, entraps a sheriff and posse there, Oct. 20, 1768 Maps of Boston John Bonner published, in 1722 William Price published one in 1769 Market Day, the town appointed Thursday, 1643 Clerk, was chosen by the town, 1650 Market Clerks The town chose six, 1706 Of Quincy Market, Caleb Hayward, chosen, 1822 Of Quincy Market, Daniel Rhodes, chosen, 1836 Of Quincy Market, Charles B. Rice, chosen, 1852 Of Quincy Market, George E. McKay, chosen, 1877 House. An unsuccessful attempt to build, 1716 The town vote to have three, 1734 In Dock
anti-slavery movement, and the final triumph of its advocates, the progress of science, the inventions which contribute so much to our happiness, the birth of literature and art in America,—when we think of what all this means, the thought of human achievement stimulates us to try to keep up to the high standard set by our predecessors, especially those who rocked the cradle of Liberty in the troublous times preceding the Revolution. On the first complete map of Boston, drafted by Captain John Bonner in 1722, is a record of three trees only, standing at the time the first settlers came. One of these, represented as the largest, was the Old Elm on Boston Common, blown down in the great storm of 1876. The two others were near the middle of what is now Park street, both long since victims of the march of time. A chair made of the wood of the Old Elm is now in the Boston Public Library. One of its descendants was planted on the hill where the Soldiers' Monument stands in 1889, but
ll, Joseph, 54. Barrett, Samuel, 17, 18, 20. Barry, J., 15. Bartlett, —, 100. Bates, Joshua, 71, 82. Battles, —--, 81. Baxter, George L., 53, 91. Baxter, Sylvester, 32. Beacon Hill, 2, 3. Beacon-Street Mall, 3. Beaver Brook, 8. Bennett, Clark, 78, 90. Bennett, Josiah Q., 53. Bent, Rev. N. T., 94. Berkeley Street, 57. Bigelow, Samuel, 17, 18, 51, 52. Blake's Philosophy, 98. Blanchard, Catherine, 47, 51. Blanchard, J., 12. Blodget, L., 15. Blue Hills, 32. Bonner, Captain, John, 2. Bonner, Phillip, 11. Bonner, William, 74, 78. Books for Grammar Schools, 1840, 98. Books for Primary Schools, 1840, 98. Boston, 2. Boston Common, 2, 3. Boston Public Library, 2. Boston School Atlas, 98. Boston Slips, 52. Bowman, Francis, 49, 99. Bowman, Martha E., 53. Bowman, Selwyn Z., 89. Bowman, Zadoc, 90. Bow Street, 55. Boylston Chapel, 81. Bracket, Charlotte, 99. Brackett, George C., 53. Brackett, Samuel, 59. Brackett, Thomas, 59. Bradbur
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