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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
he Douglas or Union Democratic party, held shortly before this, when the following clause was adopted as part of the platform: That we deplore the existence of a Union to be held together by the sword, with laws to be enforced by standing armies. A Union State central committee was then appointed, consisting of the following persons, all of whom were the most pronounced and active Union men in the State: John H. Harney, William F. Bullock, Geo. D. Prentice, James Speed, Charles Ripley, William P. Boone, Philip Tompert, Hamilton Pope, Nathaniel Wolfe and Lewis E. Harvie. After the fall of Fort Sumter, Governor Magoffin, in response to the President's call for troops, again voiced the sentiment of Kentucky when he said, Kentucky will furnish no troops for the wicked purpose of subduing her sister Southern States. On the 17th of April, two days after the above declaration, Hon. John J. Crittenden, who had just retired from the United States Senate and was the recognized Union leader
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
the 3d of August, and General Buell was actively engaged in concentrating his army there preparatory to crossing the mountains at Altamont for the invasion of East Tennessee, when General Morgan again appeared on the scene as a disturbing element. On the 10th of August, having moved from Kingston, Tenn., by his favorite route via Sparta, he made his appearance at Gallatin, 26 miles north of Nashville, which had been the scene of his raid in March, and at daylight of the 12th captured Col. W. P. Boone and five companies of the Twenty-eighth Kentucky infantry, who were paroled and sent northward at once. He then moved to the tunnel between Gallatin and Franklin, captured the stockade without a fight, and so effectually destroyed the tunnel, 800 feet long, by burning in it a long train loaded with bacon and other supplies, that it could not be repaired for several months. He then destroyed a bridge between Gallatin and Nashville, and forty cars, and withdrew to Hartsville, thirteen m
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
higan BatteryCapt. John J. Ely. Miscellaneous. Artillery reserve (Nashville). Capt. Warren P. Edgarton. 12th Indiana BatteryCapt. James E. White. 20th Indiana BatteryCapt. Milton A. Osborne. Camp Spears (Nashville). Col. Alvan C. Gillem. 17th KentuckyCol. Alexander M. Stout. 1st TennesseeCol. Alvan C. Gillem. 3d Tennessee CavalryCol. Samuel W. Pickens. 4th Tennessee CavalryMaj. Meshack Stephens. Clarksville. Col. Sanders D. Bruce. 28th KentuckyCol. William P. Boone. 102d OhioCol. William Given. 8th Kentucky Cavalry (battalion)Maj. James W. Weatherford. 1st Tennessee BatteryCapt. Ephraim P. Abbott. Gallatin. Col. Benjamin J. Sweet. 106th OhioLieut.-col. Gustavus Tafel. 13th Indiana BatteryLieut. Truman W. Hall. Cavalry corps. Maj.-gen. David S. Stanley. First division. Brig.-gen. Robert B. Mitchell. First Brigade. Col. Archibald P. Campbell. 4th KentuckyCol. Wyckliffe Cooper. 6th KentuckyCol. Louis D. Watkins. 7