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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boscawen, Edward, 1711- (search)
Boscawen, Edward, 1711- Naval officer; born in Cornwall, England, Aug. 19, 1711; son of Viscount Falmouth; was made a captain in the royal navy in March, 1737. Distinguished at Porto Bello and Carthagena, he was promoted to the command of a 60-gun ship in 1744, in which he took the Media. He signalized himself under Anson in the battle off Cape Finisterre in 1747, and against the French in the East Indies as rear-admiral the next year. He made himself master of Madras, and returned to England in 1751. Admiral of the Blue, he commanded an expedition against Louisburg, Cape Breton, in 1758, with General Amherst. In 1759 he defeated the French fleet in the Mediterranean, capturing 2,000 prisoners. For these services he was made general of the marines and member of the privy council. Parliament also granted him a pension of $15,000 a year. He died Jan. 10, 1761.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French and Indian War. (search)
returned to New York. Meanwhile, Montcalm had strengthened Fort Ticonderogn, on Lake Champlain, and captured and destroyed the English fort, William Henry, at the head of Lake George (August, 1757); and so ended the campaign and the leadership of the inefficient Lord Loudoun. William Pitt at this time took the chief control of public affairs in England, and prepared to prosecute the war in America with vigor. Gen. James Abercrombie was placed in chief command in America in 1758, and Admiral Boscawen was sent with a fleet to co-operate. Louisburg, Fort Ticonderoga, and Fort Duquesne were to be attacked. Louisburg was captured, but Abercrombie, who led the troops towards Lake Chainplain, failed in his attack on Ticonderoga. Fort Frontenac, at the foot of Lake Ontario, was captured; so, also, was Fort Duquesne, and its name was changed to Fort Pitt, in compliment to the great prime minister. These suecesses so alarmed the Indians that, having assembled in council, they agreed not