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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 2 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
left of the plateau, and necessarily throw them into great confusion. . . . In the meantime Gen. Kershaw came into the field with his brigade, near one of my regiments, the 2d Ga., which still remained in very good order; and my adjutant, Capt. Du Bose, proposed to him to unite that, and some other companies of other regiments, with his command in the attack on the enemy's batteries, to which he assented; and this command, under Cols. Butt and Holmes, accompanied by Capt. Du Bose and Maj. ACapt. Du Bose and Maj. Alexander (my quartermaster, who acted as one of my aides on the field) advanced with Gen. Kershaw's brigade beyond the edge of the wood into the open field, but, under the destructive fire of the enemy's cannon and small-arms, wavered and fell back into the road skirting the pine thicket. . . . My losses were very severe, the total being 194 killed and wounded, out of about 1200 carried into action. I am happy to add that the disorders which did arise were, due rather to the difficulties of
trictly speaking, all bodies are conductors of electricity, but those of relatively very small conductivity are known as non-conductors; for instance:— The conductivity of copper being estimated at 40,000,000, That of water is as 1. Becquerel's table is as follows:— Pure copper wire100 Gold93.6 Silver73.6 Zinc28.5 Platinum16.4 Iron15.5 Lead8.3 In practice: A prime conductor collects and transmits the frictional electricity of the electrical machine. It was introduced by Bose in 1741. A lightning-conductor, for conducting the static or tension electricity of the atmosphere harmlessly to the earth. It consists of a wire, rod, or slip of metal from the top of a house, tower, steeple, or mast, to the ground, or, better still, a ground-plate or system of buried iron pipes. Gray and Wheler, in 1720-1736, made experiments to ascertain the distance through which electric force could be transmitted, using insulated metals. Gray, in 1729, discovered the propertie
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: Bryant and the minor poets (search)
enough, in the simple thought that personifies and capitalizes: it is She herself that speaks to man, in his different hours, a various language. But it is only casually, as in Among the trees, that he wonders if the vegetable world may not have some dim and faint sense of pleasure and of pain, As in our dreams; only casually, for conscious mysticism was foreign to Bryant's intellect, and the conception had yet to be scientifically investigated in the laboratories of the Hindoo botanist Bose. Here nature, as herself the Life, is simply an hypostasis of the racial imagination in which Bryant so largely shared, just like his intimate personifications of her phenomena, her flowers, her winds, and waters; it is not a philosophic idea, but a primitive instinct. Nature's teachings for men are simply the ideas that suggest themselves to Bryant himself (not inevitably to everyone) when he observes what goes on, or what is before him: The faintest streak that on a petal lies, May sp
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
, 158, 159, 161 Blackwood's magazine, 206, 208, 292 Blair, James, 263, 271 Blake, William, 358 Blanche of Brandywine, 226 Bland, Edward, 5, 6, 10 Bleecker, Mrs., Ann Eliza, 179 Blessington, Lady, 242 Blockheads, the, 217 Blumenbach, J. F., 186 Body of liberties, 39 Boehme, Jacob, 188 Bohn, Henry, 252 Boker, George Henry, 222-223, 224, 230 Bonneville, Captain, 210 Boone, Daniel, 189, 190, 319 Booth (the elder), 224 Border Beagles, 317 Borrow, George, 321 Bose, 267 Boston, 175 Boston gazette, the, 93, 119, 129, 137 Boswell, 70 Boucher, Jonathan, 138-139 Boucicault, Dion, 231, 232 Bourne, Edward G., 192, 193 Boyle, Robert, 81 Bracebridge Hall, 239, 249, 256, 311 Brackenridge, Hugh Henry, 182, 286-287 Brackenridge, H. M., 210 Bradbury, John, 206, 210 Braddock, General, 96 Bradford, Andrew,I15, I 6, 121 Bradford, Gov., William, 19-21, 22, 23, 27, 152 Bradford, William (printer), 95 Bradstreet, Anne, III, 154-156
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
commanding Seventeenth Georgia, fell, mortally wounded, while acting in a most heroic manner. On the previous day four field officers had been wounded, one I fear mortally, Lieutenant-Colonel Seago, Twentieth Georgia; the other three were Colonel Du Bose, of the Fifteenth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel Sheppard, commanding Second Georgia, and Captain McLaws, acting Major of Second Georgia. Many other officers of the line fell killed or wounded in one fight or the other. Lieutenant Hermon H. enteenth Georgia, mortally wounded and died at night; Lieutenant-Colonel Seago, Twentieth Georgia, shot through the lungs; Captain McLewis, acting Major, Second Georgia, lost a leg; Lieutenant-Colonel Shepherd, commanding Second Georgia, and Colonel Du Bose, Fifteenth, were also wounded, but not so severely. The conduct of the brigade was most excellent. The second day it captured two batteries of four guns each, one with its flag, and held them, after a desperate struggle by the enemy to r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
, Master's mate S. G. Turner, Lieutenant W. F. Shum, Lieutenant T. C. Pinkney, Captain T. B. Ball, Lieutenant H. Ward, Midshipman B. S. Johnson, Midshipman F. L. Place, Lieutenant D. Trigg, Midshipman T. Berein, Midshipmen C. Myers, J. M. Gardner. Marine Corps.—Captain George Holmes, Captain T. S. Wilson, Lieutenant F. McKee, Lieutenant A. S. Berry, Lieutenant T. P. Gwinn. Army Officers.—Lieutenant-General Ewell, General Corse, General Barton, General Hunton, General J. P. Semmes, General Du Bose, General Custis Lee, General Kershaw and staff, Colonel C. C. Sanders, 24th Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel J. C. Timberlake, 53rd Virginia; Lieutenant N. S. Hutchins, 3rd Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Hamilton Phil, Georgia Legion; Major J. M. Goggin, Major E. L. Caston, Captain J. M. Davis, Captain Carwall, Captain J. W. Walker, A. A. G.; Captain C. S. Dwight, Captain McRae Cane, 16th Georgia; Colonel Armstrong, 18th Georgia; Captain L. Bass, 25th Virginia Battery; Lieutenant Colonel E. P.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
n, in front of Petersburg, Va. Abell, Caleb, private, captured on retreat to Appomattox (dead). Burnley, Horace B., private, captured at Fort Steadman (dead). Brown, J. Mannis, private, surrendered at Appomattox (dead). Bailey, John, private, captured (dead). Coleman, James T., private, killed at Hatcher's Run, 1864. Catterton, George Newton, orderly sergeant, wounded and captured at Fort Steadman. Catterton, Elijah N., captured at Fort Steadman (dead). Chapman, N. T. (Bose). Carr, James, captured on retreat. Coles, Thomas S., sick and died in a Petersburg hospital. Earley, Jerry A. Elliott, M. D., captured at Fort Steadman (living). Fry, J. N. Harris, James O., sergeant, surrendered at Appomattox (dead). Harris, Henry, captured at Fort Steadman. Hurt, Morris, captured on retreat to Appomattox (dead). Hill, Joseph, captured (dead). Jarman, J. L. (living). Kirby, J. S., wounded at Hatcher's Run. Kirby, Edward, captured. Maup