Your search returned 137 results in 38 document sections:

1 2 3 4
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
in Congress to suppress the Mexican mission, as being an instrumentality of annexation, Slade of Vermont Wm. Slade. seconded him, declaring that he would not give a snap of his Lib. 12.66. finger for the Union after the annexation of Texas. To Botts of Virginia, offering a preposterous pledge on the John M. Botts. part of the South, not to annex Texas if the abolitionists would disband, Mr. Garrison replied: The annexation of Lib. 12.67. Texas will be the termination of the American Union,John M. Botts. part of the South, not to annex Texas if the abolitionists would disband, Mr. Garrison replied: The annexation of Lib. 12.67. Texas will be the termination of the American Union, and therefore the South will have more to lose than to gain by it. Dr. Channing, in a sequel to his pamphlet on the Lib. 12.95. Duty of the Free States, was ready to make slavery extension (though not slavery itself) a ground of disunion: Better that we should part than be the police of the slaveholder, than fight his battles, than wage war to uphold an oppressive institution. So I say, let the Union be dissevered rather than receive Texas into the confederacy. This measure, besides e
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
's Bill Arp so called, a book which in a period of economic depression and political disappointment had the power to make Southerners laugh. Among the Southern malcontents who had no sympathy for secession, two left accounts of their opinions and experiences. Parson Brownlow, who was expelled from Tennessee early in the war, published in 1862 his Sketches of the rise and progress of secession, replete with quotations from the contemporary Southern press. A few years later a Virginian, John M. Botts, made Southern policies the subject of denunciation in his Great rebellion (1866) and started a memorable historical controversy by declaring that Lincoln had offered to surrender Fort Sumter provided that the Virginia convention of 1861 would adjourn without taking action on secession. Closely related to the autobiography were the reports of newspaper correspondents and tourists. These were especially noticeable between 1865 and 1876 when the economic and social upheaval in the Sout
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Book of doctrine and Covenants, 519. 522 Book of martyrs (Foxe), 521 Book of martyrs, the (Mormon), 522 Book of Mormon, the, 517-21, 522 n. Book of the East, the, 44 Boone, Daniel, 66 Booth, Edwin, 269 Booth, John Wilkes, 269 Boots and Saddles, 160 Bopp, 460, 467, 476 Bordley, J. B., 431 Bornemann, 583 Bornstein, H., 587 Bosanquet, 239, 254, 264 n. Boss, the, 293 Boston Burglar, the, 510, 514 Bostonians, the, 6, 98, 104 Boston Latin School, 219 Botts, John M., 352 Botwinik, B., 606 Boucicault, Dion, 266, 268, 270, 281 Bought and paid for, 293 Bounce around, 516 Bourke, John G., 159 Bourne, E. G., 185, 186, 187-88 Bouton, John Bell, 165 Boutwell, G. S., 351, 363 Bowditch, Nathaniel, 233 Bowdoin College, 70, 210 Bowen, Francis, 229, 240, 302, 435 Bowles, Samuel, 322, 325, 327, 363 Bowles, Samuel, Jr., 327 Bowne, B. P., 240 n. Bowring, 499 Boyd, Mrs., Ann, 135 Boyesen, Hjalmar, 278 Boylston, Nicholas, 471
Bonita, ship, VI., 122. Booker, T., IV., 166. Booneville, Mo., I., 352, 353. Booneville, Miss., I., 364, 367, 368. Boonsboro, Ark., II., 326. Boonsboro, Md., I., 53; II., 340; IV., 88. Booth, J. W.: VII., 203, 207; flight, capture and death of, VII., 205; VIII., 26, 363, 366; IX., 128, 338. Borodino, losses at, X., 140. Boston, R., IV., 86, 88. Boston Mountains, Ark., II., 326. Bottom's bridge, Va.: I., 286, 294; IV., 126. Botts, J. M.: opposition of, to secession, VII., 195; mansion of, in Culpeper Co., Va., VII., 195; and his family, VII., 197. Bounty-jumping, VIII., 280, 282. Bowditch, H. I., VII., 226. Bowen, J. S.: I., 360; II., 214; 334, X., 279. Bowers, T. S.: III., 81; VIII., 359; X., 49. Bowie, G. W., X., 195. Bowling Green, Ky., I., 182, 196, 211 Boxes for the soldiers, in 1865, VII., 321. Boxes ready for the boys at the front Vii., 322. Boy generals,
n's Art., Confederate, I., 356. Cullmann, F., quoted, X., 124. Cullum, G. W., VII., 330. Culpeper, Va.: I., 39; II., 39, 57, 228, 344; Meade's headquarters at, II., 345; streets of, III., 31; IV., 101; V., 34 seq.; mansion of J. M. Botts, VII., 195 seq.; John M. Botts and family, VII., 197; VIII., 124. Culpeper Court House, Culpeper, Va. : II., 16, 21, 26, 28, 229; III., 17, 28, 30, 34; IV., 92, 106, 118, 233; V., 32 seq.; Confederate prisoners confined at, VII., 33. John M. Botts and family, VII., 197; VIII., 124. Culpeper Court House, Culpeper, Va. : II., 16, 21, 26, 28, 229; III., 17, 28, 30, 34; IV., 92, 106, 118, 233; V., 32 seq.; Confederate prisoners confined at, VII., 33. Culp's Hill, Gettysburg, Pa. , II., 231, 238, 257. Culp's House, Ga., III., 322. Cumberland, Ind., III., 346; IV., 114. Cumberland, Va., I., 274, 275. Cumberland,, U. S. S., I., 358; VI., 36 seq., 82, 100, 102, 156, 166, 239, 308, 312. Cumberland, Department of, II., 296. Cumberland Gap, Ky., I., 180. Cumberland Gap, Tenn., I., 366; II., 313, 342. Cumberland Iron Works, Tenn., II., 322, 330. Cumberland Landing: I., 51, 274, 282 seq.; Federa
Political. --Ex-Governor Wise was to speak at Norfolk last night in advocacy of his Princess Anne resolutions. Hon. John M. Botts spoke in Portsmouth Wednesday night, At a Union meeting in Norfolk Wednesday night, resolutions were adopted, among which were the following: That it is unreasonable to regard the elevation of any citizen to the Presidency, who shall be duty elected by a constitutional majority of the people, as an act of aggression, or from which, of itself, we may infer designs hostile to our rights and liberties. That we have sufficient confidence in the people of the United States, in their love of the Union and reverence for the laws, to believe that they will, upon all just occasions, oppose and resist any clear violation of the Constitution, whether attempted in wantonness or under the forms of law. But we hold, that to anticipate and assume such violation, under existing circumstances, is at once unwise and unjust, and we shall regard the appointmen
Lincoln's Cabinet. --The following is the latest "composition" of Lincoln's Cabinet. It is appended to a letter from Chicago, where Lincoln and Hamlin have been in a conference for some days: Secretary of State--Edward Bates, of Missouri. Secretary of War-- Geo. Ashmun, of Massachusetts. Secretary of the Navy--John M. Botts, of Virginia. Secretary of the Interior--Robert C. Schenck, of Ohio. Secretary of the Treasury--Wm. B. Ogden, of Illinois. Postmaster General--Schuyler Colfax, of Indiana. Attorney General--Henry Winter Davis, of Maryland.
e must fall, and ought to fall. Northern fanaticism would deny the first, has loosened the second, and threatens the last. Will the conservatives repair the wrong and restore the edifice? [Music--"Star Spangled Banner."] By request, Hon. John M. Botts responded. The Union was a subject upon which he was always prepared to speak. He referred with gratification to the fact that the Electoral vote of Virginia had been cast for Bell and Everett, and accorded honor to the five Breckinridge of officers — and Congress assuming the responsibility of paying for every slave so rescued, and holding it as a charge against the State in which such rescue was effected — and it would satisfy all the South except South Carolina. [Applause] Mr. Botts commented with some severity upon the President's Message. He thought it an absurdity for the President to say that he could not execute the law in South Carolina, because there was no Judge and no Marshal. If the Constitution and the laws co
Mr. Jas. H. May moved that a committee of three be appointed to wait on the Hon. John M. Botts, and invite him to address the meeting. Cries of "out of order," c the affirmative. The Chair appointed the following committee to wait on Mr. Botts: Jas. H. May. Richard F. Walker, and Wm. R. Sturdivant. A motion was mad for the approaching State Convention. Before the reading was concluded, Mr. Botts entered with the committee, and was greeted with loud cheers. This interruptn the table was lost. Before any further action was taken, the calls for Mr. Botts became most vehement.--Mr. Botts came forward on the stand, and was received Mr. Botts came forward on the stand, and was received with various demonstrations.--Mr. Thos. Clemmitt stood up and gesticulated with much energy, and as well as we could understand, appealed to the meeting to hear none at the same time — cheers and hisses commingled inharmoniously — and finally Mr. Botts was understood to say that he did not come there to address a mob, and retire
The Daily Dispatch: January 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], Citizens' State-rights ticket.-- Peachy R. Grattan, P. H. Aylett, Geo. W. Randolph. (search)
A card. --Messrs. Editors: In this morning's Dispatch we perceive our names affixed to a card calling on Messrs. Macfarland, Johnson, and Botts, to announce themselves as candidates for the State Convention.--When we signed this card we had no idea that we were calling on the Hon. John Minor Botts for his nomination. We have not the least objection to Messrs. Johnson and Macfarland, but we do not wish our names attached to any list calling on Mr. Botts to represent our feelings in this great cause of our State. Andrew Pizzini, F. McCARTHY, Juan Pizzini. Richmond, January 25, 1861. ja 23--1t
1 2 3 4