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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
arty. He was married while on parole, on November 10, 1864, to Miss Mary C. Louis, daughter of a leading merchant of Orangeburg. They have four children: Frances Agnes, wife of Capt. B. Hart Moss, of Orangeburg; Samuel Dibble, Jr., civil engineer and second lieutenant of the Second volunteer United States engineers; Louis Virgil and Mary Henley. Mr. Dibble is adjutant of Camp Orangeburg, at Orangeburg, S. C. He is also president of the Edisto savings bank, at Orangeburg, the Branchville & Bowman railway, and the Enterprise cotton mills. Lieutenant Virgil C. Dibble, principal of the Charleston high school, was born in that city in 1841. Early in the spring of 1861 he left his studies at Charleston college and entered the State service as a private in the Charleston Zouaves, who were in charge of Castle Pinckney. At the close of 1861 an act of the legislature enabled college students to return and complete their courses, and he accordingly resumed his studies and was graduated in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
e hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, Bowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to ColonBowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions. A few days before he had been designated, at the request of the prisoners, to go North on parole to procure clothing, blankets, etc., for their use during the approaching winter. The papers had been prepared, and he expected to leave on his humane errand the next morning. But on that ominous morning the order for the lot selection came. Colonel Lee was one of the hostages. General Winder, a West Point classmate and person
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of Libby prison. (search)
e hanging of the crew of the Savannah. They were as finally settled—Captains Ricketts and Mc-Quade, who had drawn fatal numbers, on account of their wounds being substituted by others—Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff and Woods; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, Bowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to ColonBowman and Keffer. None of the privateers were executed, and the hostages were subsequently released and exchanged. An interesting episode took place in relation to Colonel E. Raymond Lee, of Boston, in connection with these transactions. A few days before he had been designated, at the request of the prisoners, to go North on parole to procure clothing, blankets, etc., for their use during the approaching winter. The papers had been prepared, and he expected to leave on his humane errand the next morning. But on that ominous morning the order for the lot selection came. Colonel Lee was one of the hostages. General Winder, a West Point classmate and person
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Prison Pastimes. (search)
er happy, and despite of adversity feels that the clouds around him are not the frowns of heaven. Bulwer. Advertisements. Division 22.—M. L. White, Lieutenant Thirty-third N. C. T., is prepared to execute all kinds of engravings on metals with neatness and dispatch. B. F. Cartwright & Co.—Division 24—Manufacture plain and gutta-percha rings, chains and breastpins, etc. Call and see specimens of our work. Tailoring Establishment.—Division 22—Griggs & Church, successors to Beval, Bowman & Church, are prepared to execute all kinds of fashionable tailoring at reasonable rates, at their shop, S. E. corner, upper tier of bunks. Call soon, as a stich in time saves nine. Division 32.—Washing and ironing done with care and promptness by Davenport & Boswell. S. G. Davenport, Captain Ga. B. I.; I. C. Boswell, Captain 23d Ga. R. I. Barber Shop.—Division 24—Shaving, shampooing, hair-cutting, dyeing and hair-dressing done up in the latest style. Choice selection of pe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
rative surgery, under Sir Joseph Lister. Graduating at Edinburgh, he went to Dublin, and was appointed resident student in the Rotunda Hospital, one of the most extensive and renowned maternity institutions in Europe. While there he attended the clinics of Stokes and Corrigan, also the eye clinics of the talented Sir William Wilde, father of the aesthetic Oscar Wilde. From Dublin he went to London, and took the surgical courses of Ferguson, Erichson and Paget, attending the eye clinics of Bowman and Critchett, at Moorefield Eye Hospital, Leaving London he went to Paris and continued his studies in the hospitals under Telpeau, Nelaton, Jobert, Trousseau and Chassignac. During his studentship in Edinburgh he spent his vacations in visiting all the places of historical interest in Great Britain and on the Continent, embracing a tour through the Alps on foot. When the first notes of war between the States were sounded across the Atlantic in 1861, he returned at once to his native land
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Bibliographical note (search)
t, by his former aid-de-camp, General Badeau, of which only the first volume has appeared; the two books of Mr. Swinton, entitled, respectively, History of the Army of the Potomac, one volume, and The Twelve Decisive Battles of the War, one volume. To continue the list of works written from a Union point of view, we will mention, without attempting to classify them, History of the Rebellion, by Appleton, one volume; Life of General Grant, by Coppee, one volume; Life of General Sherman, by Bowman and Irwin, one volume; Thirteen Months in the Rebel Army, by Stevenson, one volume; The Volunteer Quartermaster, one volume; History of the United States Cavalry, by Brackett, one volume; a large number of technical papers in the American Cyclopaedia, a work in four volumes; Political History of the Rebellion, by McPherson, one volume; Life of Abraham Lincoln, by Raymond, one volume; The American Conflict, by Horace Greeley, two volumes. Among the Confederate publications to which we are
it is said, come to this country to describe men and things at the present juncture. Mrs. Elizabeth Fudge died in Washington county, Va., on the 9th inst., leaving 100 grand children and nearly fifty great-grand-children. John R. Branner, of Knoxville, has been elected President of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. A house of ill-fame, in Wythville, Va., known as "Fort Sumter," was demolished by the citizens of that place last week. The woolen factory of Bailey & Bowman, in Frederick county, Va., was burnt on the 7th inst. Loss $3,000. D. M. Warren, the author of several well-known educational works, died in Baltimore on the 9th inst. Peachy R. Gilmer, a prominent citizen of Montgomery, Ala., died on the 13th inst. He was a native of Virginia. The small-pox is prevalent in Jersey City.--Fifteen cases have resulted fatally. Temperance Hall, in South Nashville, Tenn., was destroyed by fire a few days since. A recruiting office for the
nger, Lt. Green, Adit Phillips, and Band 1st Infantry; A and D, 8th Infantry, Capt. Jordan, Asst. Surgeons Lynde and Burns. In all, 450 men. Seven companies of the 8th Infantry are on the way to the coast. They will be intercepted and disarmed. Officers not with Maj. Sibley on the vessels arrested and on parole : Col. Waite and staff, Col Morris, Adjt. Nichols, Maj. Vinton, Lt. Gerrard, Surgeon Abadie, Asst. Surgoon G. R. Smith, Col. Roffman Maj Sprague, Maj McCline,Capt. Lee,Capt. Bowman, Lt. Wipple, Maj. Cunningham, Lt. Whistier, Lt.Hunter. Officers Resigned --Maj. Larkin Smith, Capt. Blair,Capt. Reynolds, Capt. Trevett, Lt. Cone, Lt. M. L. Davis, Haskell, Walter Jones, Dr. Anderson, Lt. Jas. Major, Lt. Washington. The capture and resignation of these officers will deprive the Department at Washington of the services of about thirty five of the most efficient men in the service, and cripple its power to do us mischief. The terms of the surrender are that a
Prisoners arrived. --Col. Thomas, of the Maryland Volunteers, arrived in this city yesterday via Central Railroad, bringing official accounts of an engagement between the patriot forces and Northern Abolitionists near New Creek Depot; also, two prisoners-of-war, one of them calling himself Lieutenant Colonel Bowman, of the 8th Pennsylvania Regiment, the name of the other unknown. They were conveyed before the Secretary of War, at the Custom-House building, Bank street, who, after a brief examination, discharged them on parole of honor.
Movements of Gen. Cadwallader--Capture of prisoners, &c. Gordonsville, June 21. --Gen. Cadwallader commanded the Federal troops approaching Harper's Ferry. He has retired beyond Hagerstown, and Harper's Ferry is again held by our troops, consisting of 400 to 500 Marylanders. Gen. Johnston is at Winchester. Two prisoners of war, taken at Williams port, will go to Richmond to day. One is Lieut. Col. Bowman, of the Eighth Pennsylvania Regiment; the other Maj. Chase, connected with the Adjutant's Department, same Regiment. They are under charge of Colonel Thomas, of the Maryland Volunteers, who carries the official report of the engagement at New Creek Depot. Winchester now commands the whole Valley as a strategic position. Gen. Johnston's movement from Harper's Ferry toward Martinsburg to meet the enemy, instead of being a retreat was an advance upon the enemy, who were approaching by Williamsport and Martinsburg. Gen. Johnston's march was North. He also
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