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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
ion military Governor Governor Andrew Johnson, (1862-5) Texas Governor Samuel Houston (1859-61) Governor Edward Clark, acting (1861) Governor Francis R. Lubbock 1861-3) Governor Pendleton Murrah (1863-5) Virginia Governor John Letcher (1860-4) Governor William Smith, (1864-5) Border States Kentucky Governor Beriah Magoffin (1859-62) Governor James F. Robinson (1862-3) Governor Thomas E. Bramlette (1863-7) Maryland Governor Thomas H. Hicks (1857-61) Governor A. W. Bradford (1861-5) Missouri Governor C. F. Jackson (1861) Union Governor H. R. Gamble (1861-4) Governor T. C. Fletcher (1864-8) N. B.-The Confederate Government of Kentucky was provisional in its character. George W. Johnson was elected Governor by the Russellville Convention in November, 1861. He served until he was killed in action at the battle of Shiloh. Richard Hawes was elected by the Provisional Council of Kentucky to succeed him, and acted as the C
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union men of Maryland. (search)
Mississippi, a native of Maryland, came to him and invited the co-operation of Maryland, but the Governor declined to accept the invitation. He pursued the same course with the Alabama commissioner, speaking bold, firm words for the Union. He was talking and writing constantly, and encouraging and receiving encouragement in the interest of the Union. Many public gatherings throughout the State passed resolutions commending his course. Such eminent men as the Hon. Reverdy Johnson, Hon. A. W. Bradford, and William H. Collins, Esq., sustained him by eloquent and powerful arguments, made through the press and directly to the people. The Hon. Henry Winter Davis, not a politic man like the Governor, and, therefore, distrusted by the latter as imprudent and rash, declared himself an unconditional Union man, and by his untiring energy, unequaled eloquence, and matchless ability, did much to mould public opinion, and, eventually, succeeded in bringing a strong party to his own advance
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
rwhelmingly against secession. On the 10th of January, 1861, in answer to a call published in the newspapers, a mass meeting was held at the Maryland Institute for the adoption of measures favorable to the perpetuation of the Union of the States. This. meeting was one of the largest and most enthusiastic which had ever been held in the city. Every available spot was occupied, and the officers and speakers comprised some of the best citizens of Baltimore, among them Reverdy Johnson, Governor Bradford, and Judge Pearre. Subsequently, another mass meeting was held of citizens in favor of restoring the constitutional union of the States, in which the Hon. R. M. McLane, Mr. S. Teackle Wallis, Hon. Joshua Vansant, Dr. A. C. Robinson, and other well-known Southern sympathizers took an active part. Even as late as April 12th, when the siege of Fort Sumter.had begun, and only one week before the riot, two men were assaulted and mobbed, one on Baltimore, the other on South street,for wear
and destroyed all their camp equipage, killing seven, and capturing nine. They pursued them about one and a half miles, when they were reenforced by two regiments of infantry and three pieces of artillery. The National force then fell back without the loss of a man. Major John J. Key was dismissed from the service of the United States for having replied to the question propounded to him--Why was not the rebel army bagged immediately after the battle near Sharpsburgh? --that it was not the game; that we should tire the rebels out and ourselves; that that was the only way the Union could be preserved, we come together fraternally, and slavery be saved. Augusta, Ky., was captured by a force of rebel guerrillas, under Captain Basil Duke. The home guard, under the command of Colonel Bradford, vigorously attacked the rebels from the houses; but, being outnumbered, they were compelled to surrender, but not before killing and wounding a large number of their enemies.--(Doc. 212.)
October 8. The battle of Chaplin Hills, or Perryville, Ky., was this day fought between the Union army under General Buell, and the rebel forces under General Bragg, resulting, after an engagement of several hours' duration, in the retreat of the rebels across Chaplin River. The loss on both sides was very severe. The Union Generals Jackson and Terrell were killed in this battle.--(Doc. 128.) Seventeen National Government wagons, a number of sutlers' wagons, and about five hundred and fifty men of Gen. Sill's column, under the command of Major Bradford, were this day captured in the vicinity of Frankfort, Ky., by the rebel forces under Gen. E. Kirby Smith.--A force of seventeen Union cavalrymen to-day dashed into Middleburgh, Loudon County, Va., and captured several wagons loaded with bacon belonging to the rebels.
Doc. 76.-Governor Bradford's appeal. Baltimore, Md., June 21, 1863. To the People of the State and City: The proclamation which I issued on the seventeenth instant, calling upon you to furnish six months volunteers for the quota of militia required of us by the Government has not met with that prompt and practical response which I thought I had the right to expect. Whilst some, with a cheerful alacrity worthy of all praise, have offered themselves for the service, the number, I regrse, he will have occasion to-morrow (Monday) morning for one or two thousand patriotic citizens to be employed in different fortifications at other points. To wield a pick or a spade for such a purpose is fully as honorable, and just now quite as essential, as to shoulder a musket or unsheathe a sword. All citizens who will volunteer for this work are invited to present themselves at Monument Square, in front of the General's headquarters, at nine o'clock Monday morning. A. W. Bradford.
Doc. 215.-election in Maryland. Letter from Governor Bradford. Executive office, Annapolis, October 31, 1863. To His Excellency, President Lincoln: sir: Rumors are to-day current, and they reach me in such a shape that I am bound to believe them, that detachments of soldiers are to be despatched on Monday next to seveely therefore upon your Excellency for such an order as will prevent it. I have the honor to be, with great respect, your Excellency's obedient servant, A. W. Bradford Reply of President Lincooln. war Department, Washington, November 2, 1863. To His Excellency A. W. Bradford, Governor of Maryland: sir: Yours of Excellency A. W. Bradford, Governor of Maryland: sir: Yours of the thirty-first ultimo was received yesterday, about noon, and since then I have been giving most earnest attention to the subject matter of it. At my call General Schenck has attended, and he assures me that it is almost certain that violence will be used at some of the voting-places on election day, unless prevented by his provo
ices was felt by those who were most nearly interested may be learned by an executive order of the Governor of Maryland, as follows:-- State of Maryland, Executive Department, Annapolis, September 29, 1862. The expulsion of the rebel army from the soil of Maryland should not be suffered to pass without a proper acknowledgment, and the cordial thanks of her authorities to those who were chiefly instrumental in compelling that evacuation. I would tender, therefore, on behalf of the State of Maryland, to Major-General McClellan, and the gallant officers and men under his command, my earnest and hearty thanks for the distinguished courage, skill, and gallantry with which the achievement was accomplished. It reflects a lustre upon the ability of the commander-in-chief, and the heroism and endurance of his followers, that the country everywhere recognizes, and that even our enemies are constrained to acknowledge. A. W. Bradford. By the Governor: Wm. B. Hill, Secretary of State.
construction was in more than one instance the unfortunate occasion of the loss of field-guns. It affords me great satisfaction to state that the Ordnance Department in the main kept the supply constantly up to the demand, and by the cheerful and ready attention to complaints, and the prompt creation of the requisite means enabled me to withdraw inferior material, and substitute such as was found to be more reliable. To Lieutenant-Colonel Ramsay, in command of Washington Arsenal, to Lieutenant Bradford, his assistant, and to Captain Benton, in the office of the Chief of Ordnance, these remarks in particular apply. To their promptness, industry and active general cooperation am I indebted in a great degree for the means which enabled me to organize such an immense artillery force in so short a time. As has been before stated, the whole of the field-artillery of the Division of the Potomac, July twenty-fifth, 1861, was comprised in nine imperfectly equipped batteries of thirty gun
construction was in more than one instance the unfortunate occasion of the loss of field-guns. It affords me great satisfaction to state that the Ordnance Department in the main kept the supply constantly up to the demand, and by the cheerful and ready attention to complaints, and the prompt creation of the requisite means enabled me to withdraw inferior material, and substitute such as was found to be more reliable. To Lieutenant-Colonel Ramsay, in command of Washington Arsenal, to Lieutenant Bradford, his assistant, and to Captain Benton, in the office of the Chief of Ordnance, these remarks in particular apply. To their promptness, industry and active general cooperation am I indebted in a great degree for the means which enabled me to organize such an immense artillery force in so short a time. As has been before stated, the whole of the field-artillery of the Division of the Potomac, July twenty-fifth, 1861, was comprised in nine imperfectly equipped batteries of thirty gun
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