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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General S. D. Lee's report of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
t was a determined one, but was handsomely repulsed, with considerable loss to the enemy. They succeeded, however, in carrying an angle of the work immediately to the right of the railroad, and in planting two colors upon the parapet, which remained there for several hours. The angle was finally assaulted and carried by a gallant band of Waul's Texas legion, under command of the intrepid Lt.-Col. E. W. Pettus, Twentieth Alabama regiment. This brave officer, assisted by Major Steele and Capt. Bradly of the legion and the heroic Texans, captured the colors of the enemy and about fifty prisoners, including a lieutenant-colonel. A more daring feat has not been performed during the war, and too much praise cannot be awarded to everyone engaged in it. All the troops under my command behaved well during the assault, and inflicted severe loss upon the enemy. Waul's Texas legion particularly distinguished itself under its brave colonel, by its coolness and gallantry, as did also a portion
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
midnight before the last shot was fired, and the Confederates, sorely disappointed and chagrined, gave up the contest. The advantage was with Schofield. Hood was checked, and had lost heavily. He was bereaved of thirteen general officers and over six thousand men. Schofield had lost a little more than twenty-three hundred. The Nationals lost 189 killed, 1,088 wounded, and 1,104 missing, making a total of 2,326. General Stanley had a horse shot under him, and was severely wounded. General Bradly was also wounded, but less severely. Hood reported his entire loss, in round numbers, at 4,500. General Thomas officially reported it at 1,75 killed, 3,800 wounded, and 702 prisoners, making a total of 6,252. Hood lost the following general officers: Cleburne, Williams, Adams, Gist, Strahl, and Granberry, killed; Brown, Carter, Manigault, Quarles, Cocker ell, and Scott wounded, and Gordon captured. Cleburne was called the Stonewall Jackson of the West, and his loss was severely felt.
, if you will, we will take a big drink on it.' "Adam, a slave of Mr. James J. Hines, now in jail for the murder of Williams, is innocent. "The hoe with which I buried Mr. Williams is in the canal, about five feet from where the head of Mr. Williams was; (the hoe was obtained in the spot mentioned) It was Mr. Dotson's gun that I shot him with Mr. Williams was shot about six o'clock in the morning about thirty steps from the bridge.--After I left Mr. Williams I went to a camp of Messrs. Bradly and Giles' negroes, eight in number, near Mr. Shaw's plantation, but soon left them and went to McAlpin's, where I stayed until the 16th of this month, when I was arrested by Constable Jones and others, and was shot by Mr. Mitchell. "I have committed various robberies in the county. I robbed Mr. Schneider, on the Augusta road; Mr. J. W. Wilson, on the canal; Mr. Dotson, on Cherokee Hill, of gunpowder and shot; John H. Crawford's smoke-house, and from many others who I do not know."
when they were informed that they must return to the hospital again, and be left there as prisoners, their grief was indescribable, especially among those who were sick. The scene was heart-rending. The steamer Canonious was fired into yesterday by the rebels, a few miles this side of Harrison's Landing. No damage done. Notwithstanding our gunboats are stationed at intervals of three miles along that portion of the river, yet the rebels, with about six field pieces, dodge down near the river and fire into our transports every day. They fire and run away before the gunboats can bring their guns to bear on them. Fortress Monroe, July 9, 1862. --All is quiet in the army. Nothing is going on except throwing up breastworks and clearing away trees. Among the prisoners at the hospital on the York river, held by the rebels, is Mrs. E. K. Parlin. Dr. Bradly interceded with the rebels for the release of this lady, but to no avail, they turning a deaf ear to his entreaties.
Runaway--$50 Reward. --Left home on the 9th inst., my negro woman Jane, ginger broad color, long hair, about 5 feet 2 inches high, sprightly, and speaks quick when spoken to. Was raised by Mr. John W Bradly, of Chales City, and lived with Mr. Wm Nott last year. She may possibly stay on Church and Union Hills, where she has relations, or also she may try to make way to Charles City. I will give the above reward for her delivery in any jail in Richmond so that I may get her again. Hugh M Hutcher O S. au 12--1w
Runaway--$50 reward. --Left home on the 9th inst, my negro woman Jane, ginger bread color, long hair, about 5 feet 2 inches high, sprightly, and speaks quick when spoken to. Was raffled by Mr. John W Bradly, of Charles City, and lived with Mr. Wm Host last year. She may possibly stay on Church and Union Hills, where she has relations, or sise she may try to make way to Charles City, I will give the above reward for her delivery in any jail in Richmond so that I may get her again. Hugh M Hutches O J. au 12--1w*
Runaway--$50 reward. --Left home on the 9th inst, my negro woman Jane. gingerbread color, long hair, about 5 feet 2 inches high, uprightly, and speaks quick when spoken to. Was by Mr. John W Bradly, of Charles City, and lived with Mr. Wm. Nott last year. She may stay on Church and Union Hills, where she has ra or else she may try to make way to Charles City. I will give the above reward for her delivery in any jail in Richmond so that I may get her again. Hugh M Hutcheson. au 12--1w*
The Daily Dispatch: July 4, 1864., [Electronic resource], From Georgia — the battle of Kennesaw Mountain. (search)
own, A D C, had their horses shot while gallantly charging the enemy's works, and Capt G H Lowe, of the same staff, received a Minnie ball through his hat. The loss of field officers in very heavy. Col C H Walker, of the 3d Tenn, a gallant officer, was killed by a shell, which struck him on the head, shattering it and causing instant death. His loss will be felt in the brigade. Adj't J M Douglass, of the 18th Tenn, was also killed. The wounded are Major J P Brewster, 56th Ga; Lt Col Bradly, 34th Ga: Adj't slide, 2d Ga State Troops, all of Cumming's brigade. In Brown's brigade, Lt Col Ed C Cook, 32d Tenn, in the arm and side; Col Saffell, 26th Tenn, was slightly wounded; Major McGuire, 22d; Adj't Fonte, 26th Tenn, and Capt Mathes, acting Major 3d Tenn, were wounded.--Col Cook commanded Brown's brigade, and is as gallant an officer as there is in our army. I trust he will soon recover. In Reynold's brigade, Col French of the 63d Va, was wounded, as also Majors Harman, of
hip pirates, sentenced to be hung, and whose sentence was commuted by General McDowell to imprisonment to ten years, has been pardoned by the President. Expedition against the Apaches. General Carleton, commanding the district of Mexico, has been ordered to organize an expedition in that Territory and Arizona against the hostile Apaches, who have been committing outrages in that section and interfering with mining operations.--Star. The Bradley case. On Wednesday morning, Mr. Bradly appeared in the Circuit Court and read his answer to the rule served upon him to show cause why he should not be punished for contempt of court. He acknowledged that he had "offended against the dignity of a court of justice, the decorum fitting such a place, and the severe majesty of the law," but excused his retort upon the Judge in calling him "a liar," by saying that the Judge had first accused him of uttering an untruth. "It was," said Mr. Bradley, "as if a blow had been aimed at me,