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Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xii. (search)
es and markings of the face. The General sat patiently; but when he came to see the result, his countenance indicated decided displeasure. Why, Jones, what have you been doing? he asked. Oh, rejoined the sculptor, not much, I confess, General; I have been working out the details of the face a little more, this morning. Details? exclaimed the General, warmly; the details! Why, my man, you are spoiling the bust! At three o'clock the President was to accompany me, by appointment, to Brady's photographic galleries on Pennsylvania Avenue. The carriage had been ordered, and Mrs. Lincoln, who was to accompany us, had come down at the appointed hour, dressed for the ride, when one of those vexations, incident to all households, occurred. Neither carriage or coachman was to be seen. The President and myself stood upon the threshold of the door under the portico, awaiting the result of the inquiry for the coachman, when a letter was put into his hand. While he was reading this, p
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Xv. (search)
to the rear. The little fellow's eyes sparkled. Papa, said he, I know John Jay would never have done that of his own will. It must have been your work. Montgomery Blair told me that when the convention which nominated Mr. Lincoln met at Chicago, there was a hideous painting in the hall which was brought forward subsequently as a likeness of the nominee. Most of the delegates having never seen the original, the effect upon them was indescribable. I replied to Mr. Blair that my friend Brady, the photographer, insisted that his photograph of Mr. Lincoln, taken the morning of the day he made his Cooper Institute speech in New - York,much the best portrait, by the way, in circulation of him during the campaign,--was the means of his election. That it helped largely to this end I do not doubt. The effect of such influences, though silent, is powerful. Fremont once said to me, that the villanous wood-cut published by the New York Tribune, the next day after his nomination, lost h
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Index. (search)
Hon. I. N., 150, 237, 302. Ashley, Hon. Mr., 151. Ashmun, Hon., George, 284-286. Assassination, 63. B. Baker, G. E., 127. Baldwin, Judge, (Cal.,) 245. Baltimore Convention, 162. Barrett, Hon. J. H., 86, 254. Bateman, Newton, 192. Bates, Attorney-General, 55. Battle, Fair Oaks, 139. Beecher, Henry Ward, 135, 230. Bellows, Rev. Dr., 81, 274. Bible Presentation, 199. Bingham, Hon. John A., 234. Blair, Hon. M., 21, 46, 88. Booth, Edwin, 49. Bowen, H. C., 221. Brady, M. B., 46. Braine, Lieutenant, 94. Brooks, Noah, 63, 165, 188, 235. Bulletin, (San Francisco,) 223. Burnside, 81. C. Cabinet Meeting, 55. Cameron, Secretary, 136-138, 253. Cannon, Colonel L. B., 115. Cass, General, 271. Chase, 21, 84, 85, 86, 88-90, 180, 218, 223; letter to Stanton, 180. Cheever, Rev. Dr., 147. Chicago Convention, 119. Christian Commission, 161. Clark, Senator, 276. Clay, Henry, 71. Colfax, Hon., Schuyler, 14, 85, 87, 172, 177, 195, 285. Concert, Ma
emost of Brady's men, and here let me doff my hat to the name of M. B. Brady — few to-day are worthy to carry his camera case, even as far asr boys who came home invalided we heard of that grand picture-maker Brady, as they called him. When I made some views (with the only apparscouragements, the men imbued with vim and forcefulness by the Only Brady kept right along and to-day the world can enjoy these wonderful viemost as romantic a tale as that of their making. The net result of Brady's efforts was a collection of over seven thousand pictures (two negt its use for commercial purposes. (The $25,000 tardily voted to Mr. Brady by Congress did not retrieve his financial fortunes, and he died rk hospital, poor and forgotten, save by a few old-time friends. Brady's own negatives passed in the seventies into the possession of Anththey became the backbone of the Ordway-Rand collection; and in 1895 Brady himself had no idea what had become of them. Many were broken, los
science, requiring absolute knowledge, training, and experience. Only experts like the men that Brady trained could do such work as this. There were no lightning shutters, no automatic or universalraphs which were secured, during the campaigns of our great war, by the pluck and persistence of Brady and Gardner, and the negatives of which have, almost miraculously, been preserved through the vi Another photograph in the series, which is an example of special enterprise on the part of Mr. Brady, presents Lincoln and McClellan in consultation some time after this bloody and indecisive batee's invasion of Maryland and had enabled the President to issue the Emancipation Proclamation. Brady's camera has preserved this remarkable occasion, the last time that these two men met each otherition of Longstreet's lines. The editors have fortunately been able to include with the great Brady series of army photographs a private collection, probably unique, of more than four hundred view
Amy Vii., 287. Bradley, L. P.: III., 340; X., 125. Brady, A. G., VII., 63. Brady, M. B.: photographic skill of, I., 20-23, seq. 25, 26, 27 seq., 31, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38 seq., 39, toon of, by Thomas Nast, VIII., 2; VIII., 15, 16, 17; outfit, VIII., 25, 31; IX., 121, 123. Brady-Gardner, collection, I., 14; Civil War negatives, I., 18. Brady photographs and their historyBrady photographs and their history I., 52. Brady's road outfit, VIII., 27. Brady's What Is It wagon, I., 39, 46. Brady, T. J., III., 170, 176, 177, 178. Bragg, B.: I., 97, 132, 178, 194, 196, 200, 201, 204, 2Brady's road outfit, VIII., 27. Brady's What Is It wagon, I., 39, 46. Brady, T. J., III., 170, 176, 177, 178. Bragg, B.: I., 97, 132, 178, 194, 196, 200, 201, 204, 208, 211, 360; II., 64, 146, 162, 166, 174, 178, 270, 272, 281, 290, 294, 318, 324, 326, 330, 338, 340, 342, 341, 346; III., 24, 30, 106, 225, 344; IV., 144, 147, 153, 155, 156, 158, 160, 175; V., 57,Brady's What Is It wagon, I., 39, 46. Brady, T. J., III., 170, 176, 177, 178. Bragg, B.: I., 97, 132, 178, 194, 196, 200, 201, 204, 208, 211, 360; II., 64, 146, 162, 166, 174, 178, 270, 272, 281, 290, 294, 318, 324, 326, 330, 338, 340, 342, 341, 346; III., 24, 30, 106, 225, 344; IV., 144, 147, 153, 155, 156, 158, 160, 175; V., 57, 70, 206, 292; VI., 308; VII., 114; VIII., 18, 157, 196, 206, 238, 290, 292, 325, 362; IX., 99, 101; X., 160, 243, 262. Bragg, E. S., X., 309. Bragg,, C. S. S. (See also General Bragg,, C. S