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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 958 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 615 3 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 562 2 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 454 2 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 380 16 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 343 1 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 340 20 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 339 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 325 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 308 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 22, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Braxton Bragg or search for Braxton Bragg in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

ley, brother of the Ex-Military Governor of North Carolina, has been arrested by Gen. Foster for Secession sympathies. The editor of the Alexandria Gazette has been notified that his paper will be stopped if he persists in calling the Legislature at Richmond "the Virginia Legislature." Maine has given Cony, (Rep.,) for Governor, an overwhelming majority. Among the reports in the Northern papers are the following: That Gen. Joe. Johnston has been placed in command of the Army of Northern Virginia in place of Gen. Lee, who has gone to Tennessee; that three divisions of Lee's army have gone to Bragg, and that Longstreet has gone there too. The Herald, in an editorial, says: The probability of a war with England or with France, or with both of these Powers combined, is now the general and absorbing topic of conversation, and even exercises a considerable influence upon the speculations in Wall street. Gold was quoted in New York on the 18th at 133¾a134.
The Daily Dispatch: September 22, 1863., [Electronic resource], A Glance at the condition of Affairs in East Tennessee. (search)
the Southern territory. But this will not be begun until the spring of 1864. In the meantime, if not dislodged by a direct assault or sudden flank movement by Gen. Bragg, he will proceed quietly to prepare for the winter, establish his depots of subsistence, guard the line of railway communication to the strong garrisoned city orojects for the holding of Tennessee may be defeated. There are two certain ways in which that defeat may be accomplished. First, by the main strength of Bragg's army hurled against the Federal armed force on our border, and the rout of that army in irretrievable disintegration and irremediable disaster. The second cothing more than throw forward their line of skirmishers. It was here that Gen. Forrest charged the enemy's line and was slightly wounded. Cavalry skirmishes occur, almost daily. Rumor reports Burnside's advance at Cleveland. I have no doubt but what this is true, if so, we shall have warm times on General Bragg's right.
The situation in East Tennessee. --Gen. Bragg seems to us to have a grand opportunity of immortalizing himself, and doing signal service to his country. He is bearing upon the issue of the war than any that have been yet undertaken. If Gen. Bragg should destroy the army of Rosecrans — should either disperse it by a great bt is the more pleasing thought of the two, and we shall soon know the issue. Gen. Bragg must be conscious that he has already sufficiently proved his skill in makingugh our forces had gained a material advantage. As the armies of Rosecrans and Bragg were facing each other, about six miles apart, at Summerville, Ga., on the 18th inst, it is probable that the former was retreating to Chattanooga when Bragg precipitated his forces upon it. This is the more likely from the fact that Cleveland,the Chickamauga river is about ten miles from Ringgold, Ga. The dispatch from Gen. Bragg tells all that we can know about the result of the two days fight. It is to
Important from Northern Georgia. battle between Gens. Bragg's and Rosecrans's armies--two days hard fighting — heavy losses on both sides, etc. Chickamauga River, Sept. 20, Via Ringgold, 21st. To Gen. S. Cooper,A. and I. Gen: After two days hard fighting we have driven the enemy, after a desperate resistance, from several positions, and now hold the field, but he still confronts us. The losses are heavy on both sides, especially so in our officers. We have takehting — heavy losses on both sides, etc. Chickamauga River, Sept. 20, Via Ringgold, 21st. To Gen. S. Cooper,A. and I. Gen: After two days hard fighting we have driven the enemy, after a desperate resistance, from several positions, and now hold the field, but he still confronts us. The losses are heavy on both sides, especially so in our officers. We have taken over twenty pieces of artillery, and some twenty-five hundred prisoners. (Signed,) Braxton Bragg, General