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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
le-pits, field works, and the loss of the celebrated Fauquier battery and some two thousand men. The rebel press, with few exceptions, admitted the failure, and censured Longstreet. The Richmond Examiner, of November twenty-seventh, 1863, pronounced his Knoxville and Suffolk campaigns as parallel failures, and said: It was during the parallel campaign of Longstreet against Suffolk that Hooker made his coup at Chancellorsville; but he found there Jackson, while Grant had to do with Bragg alone. The effective Federal force at the outset was nearly fourteen thousand, with three small wooden gunboats. This was distributed on lines of about twelve miles in extent. No defeat was experienced by our arms. Rappahannock. During the presence of Longstreet's wing at Suffolk, Lee, with Jackson's wing, was confronted by the army of Hooker. Hooker was advised of every change in my front, and assured that I would hold Longstreet as long as possible in order that he might destro
eet, may be defeated; but such an event is scarcely within the range of possibility. In spite of the high hopes of the South, the siege was raised during the night of the third of May (twenty-four days), after the construction of from eight to ten miles of covered ways, rifle-pits, field works, and the loss of the celebrated Fauquier battery and some two thousand men. The rebel press, with few exceptions, admitted the failure, and censured Longstreet. The Richmond Examiner, of November twenty-seventh, 1863, pronounced his Knoxville and Suffolk campaigns as parallel failures, and said: It was during the parallel campaign of Longstreet against Suffolk that Hooker made his coup at Chancellorsville; but he found there Jackson, while Grant had to do with Bragg alone. The effective Federal force at the outset was nearly fourteen thousand, with three small wooden gunboats. This was distributed on lines of about twelve miles in extent. No defeat was experienced by our arms.
en said that I abandoned Georgia to her fate. Shame upon such falsehood. Where could the author have been when Walker, when Polk, and when General Stephen D. Lee were sent to his assistance? Miserable man. The man who uttered this was a scoundrel. He was not a man to save our country. If I knew that a General did not possess the right qualities to command, would I not be wrong if he was not removed? Why, when our army was falling back from Northern Georgia, I even heard that I had sent Bragg with pontoons to cross it to Cuba. But we must be charitable. The man who can speculate ought to be made to take up his musket. When the war is over and our independence won — and we establish our independence — who will be our aristocracy? I hope the limping soldier. To the young ladies I would say that when choosing between an empty sleeve and the man who had remained at home and grown rich, always take the empty sleeve. Let the old men remain at home and make bread. But should they
A force of six thousand five hundred men was regarded as sufficient. The time of starting was not definitely arranged, but it was thought all would be ready by the sixth of December, if not before. Learning, on the thirtieth of November, that Bragg had gone to Georgia, taking with him most of the forces about Wilmington, I deemed it of the utmost importance that the expedition should reach its destination before the return of Bragg, and directed General Butler to make all arrangements for tBragg, and directed General Butler to make all arrangements for the departure of Major-General Weitzel, who had been designated to command the land forces, so that the navy might not be detained one moment. On the sixth of December, the following instructions were given: City Point, Va., December 6, 1864. General: The first object of the expedition under General Weitzel is to close to the enemy the port of Wilmington. If successful in this, the second will be to capture Wilmington itself. There are reasonable grounds to hope for success, if adv
rrection, especially in the States of Illinois and Indiana, against the Government of the United States. About the twenty-fifth day of August last an expedition was organized at Toronto, Canada, under the immediate direction of Captain Hines, formerly of Morgan's command, composed of one hundred and fifty to two hundred escaped prisoners and rebel soldiers, accompanied by Colonel G. St. Leger Grenfell, at one time Morgan's Chief of Staff and afterward Inspector-General on the staff of General Bragg; Colonel Vincent Marmaduke, of Missouri; Colonel Ben. Anderson, of Kentucky; Captains Castleman and Cantrell, formerly of Morgan's command, and other rebel officers. This force was armed with pistols at Toronto, divided, and its members, in citizen's dress, came to Chicago, by different routes, in the same trains which brought the thronging thousands who assembled on the twenty-ninth of August to attend the Chicago Convention, and which made it difficult to detect their presence. It
ore, reached Fort De Russy without any casualties worthy of special mention. The capture by the rebels on the fourth instant of the little gunboat Signal has not been made public. The event occurred at or near Snaggy Point, and very close to the place where the John Warner was taken about the same date. The following officers were taken prisoners along with her: Lieutenant William Simpson, A. D. C., on General Banks' staff; Lieutenant-Commanding E. A. Morgan, U. S. Navy ; Acting-Ensign Charles P. Bragg, U. S. Navy; Acting-Ensign William F. Loam, U. S. Navy; Acting Master's-Mate E. D. Lovel; Acting Master's-Mate R. P. Croft; Acting Master's-Mate And. Donaldson; Third Assistant-Engineer J. F. Liddell; Paymaster's Steward Eugene Colbert, and the mail messenger. As our army marched out from Alexandria the mounted scouts of the enemy were seen hovering almost constantly about us, though they seldom approached near enough to give a chance to pick them off. As our forces arrived
battery was heavy. Hawley's and Barton's brigades, of Terry's division, Tenth corps, did the hardest fighting on the left of our line. Both organizations suffered severely. We took in all about two hundred rebels prisoners. Among them were several high officers, a colonel, a major, and a score or more of captains and lieutenants. Prisoners tell us that on Sunday night they were reinforced by three. brigades from Richmond, but whether from Lee's army or not we could not determine. Bragg and Jeff. Davis are positively asserted to have come from Richmond to be near Beauregard during the fight. Major Brooks, Chief Engineer of General Gillmore's staff, slightly wounded in right arm. Captain Platt, of the Second New-Hampshire, was killed. He was the only officer killed of the Second, Tenth, Twelfth and Thirteenth New Hampshire regiments. Lieutenant Wheeler, of General Heckman's staff, was killed. The fog was so dense during the early part of the fight that officers
hed the destination predicted for him since his check at Spottsylvania — the York and Peninsula. His next base will be the Pamunkey and York, and White House and West Point. Unable to remove the obstacle on the threshold of his campaign, nothing was left but to abandon it, and make his way down the Rappahannock to the head-waters of the York, a monstrous circle, to reach a point where he might have landed on the first of May, had not his head been addled by his victories over Pemberton and Bragg. This is the tone of men who, knowing the prodigious labor expended in fortifying a chosen position, themselves compelled to forfeit its advantages and seek elsewhere and ominously nearer their capital, a new line of defence. Certainly, if the Richmond journalists find any satisfaction in the monstrous circuit the army has made, the point at which it has aimed, this army is in condition to share the sentiment. Recrossing the North Anna on Thursday night and Friday morning, the corps w
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), headquarters Army of the Potomac, in the field, near Hanovertown, Va. Tuesday, May 31. (search)
hed the destination predicted for him since his check at Spottsylvania — the York and Peninsula. His next base will be the Pamunkey and York, and White House and West Point. Unable to remove the obstacle on the threshold of his campaign, nothing was left but to abandon it, and make his way down the Rappahannock to the head-waters of the York, a monstrous circle, to reach a point where he might have landed on the first of May, had not his head been addled by his victories over Pemberton and Bragg. This is the tone of men who, knowing the prodigious labor expended in fortifying a chosen position, themselves compelled to forfeit its advantages and seek elsewhere and ominously nearer their capital, a new line of defence. Certainly, if the Richmond journalists find any satisfaction in the monstrous circuit the army has made, the point at which it has aimed, this army is in condition to share the sentiment. Recrossing the North Anna on Thursday night and Friday morning, the corps w