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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert. You can also browse the collection for Lane Brandon or search for Lane Brandon in all documents.

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Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 9: Malvern Hill and the effect of the Seven Days battles (search)
having prayers so close under the Yankee guns; that he didn't seem to pay hardly enough attention to them things. Colonel Brandon, father of my Yale classmate of that name, who was a captain in the regiment, was lieutenantcolonel of the Twenty-fi, but an old man and very stout and heavy. I do not recollect whether Colonel Humphreys was present at Malvem Hill, but Brandon certainly went in with his regiment when the brigade, as I remember, unsupported, made repeated quixotic efforts to captmassed on the hill. They were exposed to the fire I have already described, and of course suffered bloody repulse. Colonel Brandon had his ankle shattered while the regiment was advancing in the first charge. On the way back his men proposed to caid: Tell the Twentyfirst they can't get me till they take those guns! When the line passed him on the second charge, Brandon put his hat on his sword, held it up and waved it, cheering the regiment on, but in a few moments the bleeding remnant s
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 10: Second Manassas-SharpsburgFredericksburg (search)
and its blood was up in their defense. The Twenty-first Mississippi was the last regiment to leave the city. The last detachment was under the command of Lane Brandon, already mentioned as my quondam classmate at Yale, and son of old Colonel Brandon, of the Twenty-first, who behaved so heroically at Malvern Hill. In skirmisColonel Brandon, of the Twenty-first, who behaved so heroically at Malvern Hill. In skirmishing with the head of the Federal column-led, I think, by the Twentieth Massachusetts-Brandon captured a few prisoners and learned that the advance company was commanded by Abbott, who had been his chum at Harvard Law School when the war began. He lost his head completely. He refused to retire before Abbott. He fought him fieBrandon captured a few prisoners and learned that the advance company was commanded by Abbott, who had been his chum at Harvard Law School when the war began. He lost his head completely. He refused to retire before Abbott. He fought him fiercely and was actually driving him back. In this he was violating orders and breaking our plan of battle. He was put under arrest and his subaltern brought the command out of town. Buck Denman,--our old friend Buck, of Leesburg and Fort Johnston fame,--a Mississippi bear hunter and a superb specimen of manhood, was color serg
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 21: Cold Harbor of 1864. (search)
wever, that it was very hard indeed for a gentleman to walk in those filthy, abominable covered ways. The spring was perhaps the point of greatest power and pathos in all the weird drama of The lines. About this date, or very soon after, a few of us were sitting in the part of the trenches occupied by the Twenty-first Mississippi, of our old brigade,--Barksdale's, now Humphreys',--which was supporting our guns. There had been a number of Yale men in the Twenty-first--the Sims, Smiths, Brandon, Scott, and perhaps others. A good many were gone, and those of us who were left were talking of them and of good times at Old Yale, when someone said, Scott, isn't it your turn to go to the spring? Yes, said Scott, submissively, I believe it is. Pass up your canteens, and he loaded up and started out. There was a particularly exposed spot on the way to water, which we had tried in vain to protect more perfectly, and we heard, as usual, two or three rifle shots as Scott passed that point.