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The Daily Dispatch: June 22, 1864., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
rd L. Dargan. Arkansas--Felix L. Batson, Grandison D. Royston, Augustus H. Garland, Thomas B. Hanly. Florida--James B. Dawkins, Robert B. Hilton. Georgia--Julian Hartridge, C. J. Munnerlyn, Hines Holt, Augustus H. Kenan, David W. Lewis, William W. Clark, *Robert P. Frippe, *Lucius J. Gartrell, Hardy Strickland, *Augustus R. Wright. Kentucky--Alfred Boyd, John W. Crockett, H. E. Read, Geo. W. Ewing, *James S. Chrisman, T. L. Burnett, H. W. Bruce, S. S. Scott, E. M. Bruce, J. W. Moore, Robert J. Breckenridge, John M. Elliott. Louisiana--Charles J. Villere, *Charles M. Conrad, Duncan F. Kenner, Lucien J. Dupre, John F. Lewis, John Perkins, Jr. Mississippi--J. W. Clapp, *Reuben Davis, Israel Welch, H. C. Chambers, *O. R. Singleton, E. Barksdale, *John J. McRae. Missouri--W. M. Cook, Thomas A. Harris, Casper W. Bell, A. H. Conrow, George G. Vest, Thomas W. Freeman, John Hyer. North Carolina--*W. N. H. Smith, Robert R. Bridgers, Owen R. Keenan, T. D. McDowell, Thomas S. Ashe, Arch. H. Arrin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
Mrs. Agatha Marshall, an excellent and cultured lady, till his twelfth year, when he entered a grammar school and commenced the study of the ancient languages. When about fourteen, his father, Dr. Louis Marshall, procured an accomplished classical scholar as teacher in his family. By this gentleman he was instructed in the Latin, Greek and French languages, and from him he also gained some knowledge of rhetoric, English literature and history. It may be interesting to know that Dr. Robert J. Breckenridge, Dr. Louis Green, once president of Danville College, Rev. John A. McClung, and many others since famous, received instruction in the classics from the same teacher. Young Marshall diligently pursued his studies under the eye of his father, and was never sent to a college or university. At twenty he went to Virginia to enter into a thorough study of history as the basis of jurisprudence, under the guidance of his uncle, James Marshall, a recluse student of many accomplishments a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Medical history of the Confederate States Army and Navy (search)
ve years ago, practically ended the struggle for independence of the Southern States, and during this quarter of a century death has thinned our ranks, and our corps can now oppose but a broken line in the great struggle against human suffering, disease and death. S. P. Moore, Surgeon-General of the Confederate Army, is dead; Charles Bell Gibson, Surgeon-General of Virginia; Surgeons L. Guild, A. J. Ford, J. A. A. Berrian, J. T. Darby, W. A. Carrington, S. A. Ramsey, Samuel Choppin, Robert J. Breckenridge, E. N. Covey, E. S. Gaillard, Paul F. Eve, O. F. Manson, Louis D. Foard, S. E. Habersham, James Bolton, Robert Gibbes, and a host of medical officers of the Confederate States Army are dead. The Association of the United Confederate Veterans was formed in New Orleans June 10, 1889, the objects of which are historical, social and benevolent. Our illustrious commander, General John B. Gordon, of Georgia, has ordered the United Confederate Veterans to assemble in Chattanooga, Tennesse
Rev Robert J Breckenridge. --The temporary organization of the Black Republican Convention which recently met in Baltimore was effected by calling Rev Robert J. Breckenridge, of Kentucky, to the chair. After being conducted thirties by Yankee hands he addressed the Convention. The following extracts from his speech will show its tenor: Dreadful as they are, these fearful truths run through the whole history of mankind, that whatever else may be done to give stability mean authority Robert J. Breckenridge, of Kentucky, to the chair. After being conducted thirties by Yankee hands he addressed the Convention. The following extracts from his speech will show its tenor: Dreadful as they are, these fearful truths run through the whole history of mankind, that whatever else may be done to give stability mean authority — whatever else may be done to give perpetuity to institutions, however wise, however glorious — and whatever may be the philosophy of it, it has been found that the only imperishable cement of all institutions has been the blood of traitors. No Government has ever stood upon irresistible foundations, which foundations were not built on traitors' blood. It is a fearful truth, but we had as well avow it at once. Every blow you strike, and every rebel you kill, and every battle you win, rel