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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 83 15 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 77 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 77 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 75 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 35 15 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 28 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 3 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Breckenridge or search for Breckenridge in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 6: Louisiana. 1859-1861. (search)
ed, but really because of the storm that was lowering heavy on the political horizon. The presidential election was to occur in November, and the nominations had already been made in stormy debates by the usual conventions. Lincoln and Hamlin (to the South utterly unknown) were the nominees of the Republican party, and for the first time both these candidates were from Northern States. The Democratic party divided--one set nominating a ticket at Charleston, and the other at Baltimore. Breckenridge and Lane were the nominees of the Southern or Democratic party; and Bell and Everett, a kind of compromise, mostly in favor in Louisiana. Political excitement was at its very height, and it was constantly asserted that Mr. Lincoln's election would imperil the Union. I purposely kept aloof from politics, would take no part, and remember that on the day of the election in November I was notified that it would be advisable for me to vote for Bell and Everett, but I openly said I would not,
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
nd the Fortieth Illinois and Thirteenth Missouri for thus holding their ground under heavy fire, although their cartridge-boxes were empty. I am ordered by General Grant to give personal credit where I think it is due, and censure where I think it merited. I concede that General McCook's splendid division from Kentucky drove back the enemy along the Corinth road, which was the great centre of this field of battle, where Beauregard commanded in person, supported by Bragg's, Polk's, and Breckenridge's divisions. I think Johnston was killed by exposing himself in front of his troops, at the time of their attack on Buckland's brigade on Sunday morning; although in this I may be mistaken. My division was made up of regiments perfectly new, nearly all having received their muskets for the first time at Paducah. None of them had ever been under fire or beheld heavy columns of an enemy bearing down on them as they did on last Sunday. To expect of them the coolness and steadiness of
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
difficulty in procuring a supply for our animals. General Thomas has defeated Hood, near Nashville, and it is hoped that he will completely crush his army. Breckenridge, at last accounts, was trying to form a junction near Murfreesboroa, but, as Thomas is between them, Breckenridge must either retreat or be defeated. GeneraBreckenridge must either retreat or be defeated. General Rosecrans made very bad work of it in Missouri, allowing Price with a small force to overrun the State and destroy millions of property. Orders have been issued for all officers and detachments having three months or more to serve, to rejoin your army via Savannah. Those having less than three months to serve, will be retainen general officers killed, wounded, and captured. The enemy probably lost five thousand men at Franklin, and ten thousand in the last three days operations. Breckenridge is said to be making for Murfreesboroa. I think he is in a most excellent place. Stoneman has nearly wiped out John Morgan's old command, and five days ago
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 25 (search)
ned strictly to belligerents. He then said Breckenridge was a major-general in the Confederate armystaff-officers back, who soon returned with Breckenridge, and he entered the room. General Johnston then again went over the whole ground, and Breckenridge confirmed what he had said as to the uneasirom Mr. Reagan, Postmaster-General. He and Breckenridge looked over them, and, after some side convter prepared for a long chase. Neither Mr. Breckenridge nor General Johnston wrote one word of thwere all presented to Generals Johnston and Breckenridge. All without exception were rejoiced that our faces toward home. I remember telling Breckenridge that he had better get away, as the feelingpeace from the Potomac to the Rio Grande. Mr. Breckenridge was present at our conference, in the cap of all arms. Both Generals Johnston and Breckenridge admitted that slavery was dead, and I could, with the rebel General Johnston. Brigadier-General Breckenridge was present at the conference. [1 more...]