hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 83 15 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 77 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 77 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 75 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 3 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 35 15 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 28 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 28 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 3 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Breckenridge or search for Breckenridge in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 5 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
Mississippi, consisting of the corps of Bragg, Polk, Hardee, and Breckenridge's reserve, was commanded by the first-mentioned of these generale of Price. He immediately repaired to Vicksburg in person with Breckenridge's division, completed and multiplied the defences of the place, New Orleans. Encouraged by this double retreat, Van Dorn sent Breckenridge, with about six thousand men and eleven cannon, to attempt the r the Webb and the Music, lying in Red River, and co-operate with Breckenridge's division in an attack upon Baton Rouge. The Federals had two vely, when on the 5th of August, at one o'clock in the morning, Breckenridge's vanguard opened the fight. Williams' troops formed a semicircwas flanked by the two gun-boats, the left wing by the Essex. Breckenridge's entire effort was directed upon the latter point, and the Feder disorder, and the assailants were crushed by their artillery. Breckenridge paused to wait for the Arkansas, unaware of the accident that ha
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
me situation as Lee and Pope three weeks previous, each almost turning his back upon his true base of operations. Buell had cause to fear a similar disaster to that which the Federals had experienced at Manassas. Leaving one division with Breckenridge on the frontier of Tennessee to check any aggressive movement on the part of the Nashville garrison, Bragg had marched in two columns, Hardee's corps taking the left, through Cave City, Polk's bearing more to the right; and on the 14th his vanbridges through which supplies were conveyed to the army, reduced the active forces under Grant to less than thirty thousand men. Those of his adversaries were not quite so numerous. Van Dorn's army, composed of the divisions of Lovell and Breckenridge, numbered about fifteen thousand men. Price's troops, comprising the divisions of Maury and Little, consisted of ten thousand five hundred infantry, two thousand five hundred horse under Armstrong, and one thousand artillerists, with forty-fou
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
f the latter corps, comprising a brigade of Breckenridge and the division of Cheatham, formed the lecorps was on the right bank of Stone River, Breckenridge occupying the front line in the positions tands Murfreesborough, were only occupied by Breckenridge's division, whose encampments could be dist thickets, while the bare hills occupied by Breckenridge were exposed to all the power of their artigram, with a brigade of cavalry attached to Breckenridge's division, had crossed Stone River below te this position. The task was entrusted to Breckenridge, whose whole division was assembled on the formation of his line, the five brigades of Breckenridge emerged from the wood, and, preceded by a s short distance to defend it against all of Breckenridge's forces. This feeble force, exposed to a esborough, so irreparable was the defeat of Breckenridge. In this fight of less than three-quarters This retreat, occurring immediately after Breckenridge's reverse, justified the Federals in regard[15 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book VII:—politics. (search)
elected eight representatives, the total contingent of that State being thirteen. On the contrary, none of the ten Kentucky members appeared at the Capitol, but her two senators took their seats on the 4th of July, although one of them was Mr. Breckenridge, who a few months later was to enter the military service of the Southern Confederacy. Tennessee was represented by only one of the two senators, and three representatives out of ten, who had been elected by districts where the Unionists werese questions continued to occupy the foremost rank in the deliberations of Congress. The republican element predominated more and more in both houses. This was in consequence of the defection of some members, who, following the example of Breckenridge, had at last thrown off the mask, and the expulsion of others convicted of being in communication with the enemy. Upon all questions involving the maintenance of the Union the War Democrats sustained the government, which was only opposed by
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
glesby's brigade. Cavalry, brigade, ...... Artillery, 16 batteries, 50 guns. Confederate army. Army of the Mississippi, Major-general Van Dorn. Division, Lovell. Villepique's brigade, Rust's brigade, Bowen's brigade. Division, Breckenridge. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; cavalry, Jackson's brigade. Army of trans-mississippi, Major-general Sterling Price. Division, Maury. Moore's brigade, Phifer's brigade, Cabell's brigade. Division, Hebert. Gates' brigade, Colbert Morton. Artillery, Colonel Barnett. Confederate army. Commander-in-chief, General Braxton Bragg. Hardee's corps, Lieutenant-general Hardee. Division, Cleburne. Johnson's brigade, Polk's brigade, Liddell's brigade. Division, Breckenridge. Adams' brigade, Preston's brigade, Hanson's brigade, Palmer's brigade. Independent brigade, K. Jackson. Cavalry, Wheeler's brigade. Polk's corps, Lieutenant-general Leonidas Polk. Division, Cheatham. Vaughn's brigade, Maney's br