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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
246, 295, 296, 363. Blatchford, Judge, 433. Bohemia, 84. Bohme, 56. Bonner, Robert, 417. Borie, Adolf E., 410, 411, 413, 414, 416. Boston, 23, 26, 456. Bottom's Bridge, 328. Boutwell, George S., 190, 353, 410. Bowers, Theodore, 5, 242, 252, 266, 278, 344, 352, 365, 374. Bowker, George H., 346. Bowman, Colonel, 363. Bradley, Justice, 443. Bragg, General, 233, 234, 250, 254-258, 262, 264, 266, 268, 270, 271, 286, 292, 293, 298. Brannan, General, 264, 269, 280, 303. Breckenridge, General, 153, 365. Breck, Major, Samuel, 252. Breeze, Sidney, 104. Bridgeport on the Tennessee, 254, 256, 274, 275, 277, 278, 283, 284, 291. Brisbane, Albert, 45, 48. Bristol, 234. Bristow, Benjamin H., 418, 435, 436. British Guiana, 471. Broderick, Senator, 153. Bronson, candidate for governor, 128. Brook Farm, 26, 30-39, 41, 43-49, 53, 57, 58, 60, 63, 94, 134, 432, 453, 454, 482; Dana's address on, appendix. Brooks, James, 487. Brooks, Preston S., 487. Brown, B. Grat
of the enemy's cavalry under Torbert at Stephenson's depot, which had been sent around towards that place for the purpose of retarding the march of the troops hastening to the relief of Winchester. A portion of Lomax's division arrived with Breckenridge, the remainder having previously come up; and with the greater part of Lee's division of cavalry were transferred to the extreme right and placed opposite Wilson's cavalry to prevent it from swinging around and getting possession of the turnpike in rear of Winchester. Gordon, previous to Breckenridge's arrival, had driven the enemy by a most gallant charge in line of battle, but going too far, had been driven back in turn. A battery of six guns, supported by a brigade of cavalry, had been placed on Gordon's extreme left. It allowed the enemy's advancing lines to pass it, their right almost brushing it, so close did it march to its position. The battery was concealed under the edge of a hill. Hardly had the Federal lines got be
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Seventh: return to the Senate. (search)
icans of Massachusetts assembled in Mass Convention at Worcester, to ratify the nomination of Mr. Lincoln for President, and John A. Andrew, for the first time, as Governor of Massachusetts. Mr. Sumner delivered the principal speech, on The Presidential Candidates, and the Issues of the Canvass. He went into a clear and analytical exposition of the entire merits of the question,—the comparative claims for support of Lincoln and Hamlin, representing the now formidable Republican party; of Breckenridge and Lane, the candidates of the now clearly announced champions of the Democratic Pro-Slavery Party; of Douglas and Johnson, the candidates of the seceding body of Democrats, known as the Douglas, or Squatter Sovereignty Party; and of bell and Everett, candidates of the few old remaining Whigs, who, like venerable barnacles, were still clinging to a sinking ship. Nothing but imperative necessity exeludes that speech from this volume. This memorable campaign, brought out from these four
icans of Massachusetts assembled in Mass Convention at Worcester, to ratify the nomination of Mr. Lincoln for President, and John A. Andrew, for the first time, as Governor of Massachusetts. Mr. Sumner delivered the principal speech, on The Presidential Candidates, and the Issues of the Canvass. He went into a clear and analytical exposition of the entire merits of the question,—the comparative claims for support of Lincoln and Hamlin, representing the now formidable Republican party; of Breckenridge and Lane, the candidates of the now clearly announced champions of the Democratic Pro-Slavery Party; of Douglas and Johnson, the candidates of the seceding body of Democrats, known as the Douglas, or Squatter Sovereignty Party; and of bell and Everett, candidates of the few old remaining Whigs, who, like venerable barnacles, were still clinging to a sinking ship. Nothing but imperative necessity exeludes that speech from this volume. This memorable campaign, brought out from these four
yet uncertain. Gen. Crook sent Thoburn's division to a ford below Snicker's, and one of the brigades of this division did charge across Island Ford, capturing some skirmishers. From this party it was learned that Early's whole force was within a couple of miles. Sending back this intelligence to Gen. Crook, Gen. Thoburn was directed to form a line with his brigades and await the arrival of a division of the Sixth Corps Infantry. Before its arrival, however, the cavalry was attacked by Breckenridge and Rodes, and forced back upon the east side of the river with a loss of over 400. When the Third Division of the Sixth came up, the division commander did not think it prudent, under the circumstances, to cross his men, and the remaining troops fell back in good order. It was as dark as Egypt as we threaded our way through the trees and among the stumps and rocks to a bivouac ground on the crest, having climbed the east slope about sundown and passed through the gorge. We left t
roops returned, July 26, to Baton Rouge, after having, for more than three months, undergone hardships such as have seldom fallen to the lot of soldiers, in a campaign whose existence is scarcely known and whose name is well-nigh forgotten. Irvin's 19th Army Corps, p. 32. In the battle of Baton Rouge, Aug. 5, 1862, the Massachusetts troops in the Department of the Gulf came for the first time under fire. The attacking party comprised about three thousand men with eleven guns under Breckenridge, and the party of defence about two thousand five hundred men with eighteen guns under Williams. Among the Confederates were many who had been under fire at Shiloh or who had defended Vicksburg, thus far successfully; while Weitzel said of the Union forces there were not twelve hundred who could have marched five miles. None of our men had been in battle; very few had been under fire. Irwin's 19th Army Corps, p. 35. The Massachusetts troops engaged were the 30th Mass. on the right and
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 11 (search)
loss. This number corresponds remarkably with that derived from a comparison of the force with which Lee opened the campaign and that present after the battle of Cold Harbor. The former was fifty-two thousand six hundred and twenty-six, and on May 31 it was forty-four thousand two hundred and forty-seven, the difference being somewhat above eight thousand. But meanwhile Lee had received accessions to his strength-seven thousand men under Pickett, from Petersburg, and two thousand under Breckenridge, from the Valley. This would make his loss, up to Cold Harbor, seventeen thousand; and adding one thousand for the casualties of that battle (an over-estimate), we obtain an aggregate of eighteen thousand. The Confederates, elated at the skilful manner in which they had constantly been thrust between Richmond and the Union army, and conscious of the terrible price in blood they had exacted from the latter, were in high spirit, and the morale of Lee's army was never better than after the
splendid record? Here lay the shattered remnants, each ghastly wound telling its own story of personal bravery. The fiery sons of South Carolina, unsubdued by the perils they had passed, unmindful of their gaping wounds, as ready then to do and dare as when they threw down the gauntlet of defiance and stood ready to defend the sovereignty of their State. The men who followed where the gallant Forrest led, looking the warrior in love with his work. The devoted patriots who charged with Breckenridge. The tall, soldierly Tennesseeans, of whom their commander said, when asked if he could take and hold a position of transcendent danger, Give me my Tennesseeans, and I'll take and hold anything; the determined, ever-ready Texans, who, under the immortal Terry, so distinguished themselves, and under other leaders in every battle of the war won undying laurels; North Carolinians, of whose courage in battle I needed no better proof than the pluck they invariably showed under the torture of
ocal Defense Troops (Departmental): Baker, Bolling, major; Henley, John A., major; Jamison, S. G., major; McAnerney, John, Jr., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Sutherland, S. F., major, lieutenant-colonel. Third Militia regiment, Seventh brigade: Hottel, J. A., lieutenant-colonel; Newell, John H., major; Sibert, James H., colonel. Third regiment Reserves: Booker, Richard A., colonel; Ewers, William M., major; Leftwich, Joel B., lieutenant-colonel. Third Infantry regiment State Line: Breckenridge, P. G., major; Clarkson, John N., colonel; Swann, Thomas B., lieutenant-colonel. Fourth Heavy Artillery regiment (ordered known as Thirty-fourth Virginia Infantry): Bagby, John R., major; goode, John Thomas, colonel; Harrison, Randolph, lieutenant-colonel; Leigh, J. Wickham, major. Fourth Cavalry regiment: Hobson, Alexander M., major; Lee, Stephen D., colonel (temporarily); Old, Charles, major, lieutenant-colonel; Payne, William H., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Randolph, Robe
ight attacks, and leave the reader to draw his own conclusions. I may add that the author of the first is unusually candid and reliable for one on his side. The only change made in the Southern line after the battle was the withdrawal of Breckenridge's troops from the salient they had lost and regained. The line was straightened, and this weak point removed. When this was accomplished, Breckenridge, about 9 o'clock that night, advanced his skirmish line to its original position. ImmediaBreckenridge, about 9 o'clock that night, advanced his skirmish line to its original position. Immediately the enemy drove it in, at the same time making an effort to carry the line of battle. They were promptly repulsed. An attack was then made on Hoke's line with a like result. The firing then ceased for the night. McCabe: Life and Campaigns of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Per contra. A little before dark it was evident from the commotion among the Confederates in front of the Philadelphia Brigade, and of the brigades on the right and left, that an assault was in preparation, Soon the comm
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