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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 185 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 172 8 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 156 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 153 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 147 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 145 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 114 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 110 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 102 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
em was concerning the treatment of our soldiers while in the hands of the enemy. The Tribune of May 17th, 1865, tells the real condition of feeling at that moment, and unequivocally shows that it was not favorable to Mr. Davis on this matter. At the instance of Mr. Greeley, Mr. Wilson and, as I was given to understand, of Mr. Stevens, I went to Canada the first week in January, 1866, taking Boston on my route, there to consult with Governor Andrew and others. While at Montreal, General John C. Breckinridge came from Toronto, at my request, for the purpose of giving me information. There I had placed in my possession the official archives of the Government of the Confederate States, which I read and considered — especially all those messages and other acts of the Executive with the Senate in its secret sessions concerning the care and exchange of prisoners. I found that the supposed inhuman and unwarlike treatment of their own captured soldiers by agents of our Government was a mos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Confederate States Navy. (search)
kfast. We were visited by Generals Van Dorn and Breckinridge, who complimented us highly and offered us any aing Lieutenant Stevens in command. Major-General John C. Breckinridge now proposed an expedition, and wishe all the force afloat. It was proposed that General Breckinridge should move with his division by rail to Tantain Brown was absent, and he preferred that General Breckinridge would wait until the repairs were completed and until Captain Brown should return. But General Breckinridge was anxious for the vessel to go without delaof one so universally loved and respected as General Breckinridge, Lieutenant Stevens consented to go, and at eded on our way down. We could hear the guns of Breckinridge, and we had hopes of being able to reach Baton R afternoon a messenger arrived on board from General Breckinridge, saying that the enemy had been driven throu could get down by next morning at daylight, General Breckinridge would attack again, and would probably bag t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
Early, is composed of the small divisions of Major-Generals John C. Breckinridge, of Kentucky; Robert E. Rhodes, of Alabama; John B. Gordon, was the scene of the Dutch General Siegel's signal defeat by General Breckinridge. The men who fit mit Siegels preferred running to fighting er spring, were less than a hundred yards from my regiment. General Breckinridge is an old acquaintance of General Blair, and had placed a guf the residence of his cousin, Hon. Andrew Hunter, in Virginia. Breckinridge is the very soul of honor, as are all our leading generals. Therched towards Boonsboro, halting five miles from Funkstown. General Breckinridge's command crossed at Shepherdstown. The majority of the mend through, over the rocks and gravel, barefoot. August 6th Breckinridge's corps, consisting of his own and Wharton's small divisions, palittle comprehension of sentiments of humanity or Christianity. Breckinridge and Gordon whipped out the Yankees badly to-day in some severe s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
he same political faith, except perhaps Mr. Polk, who was succeeded by General Taylor, running upon a no party platform. The country endorsed Polk's administration and did not repudiate him, as he declined a renomination. Another curious fact is this, that every Northern President had associated with him a Southern man as Vice-President. Thus John Adams had Thomas Jefferson; John Quincy Adams had J. C. Calhoun; Martin Van Buren had R. M. Johnson; Pierce had Wm. R. King; Buchanan had J. C. Breckinridge. On the other hand, Jackson served one term with J. C. Calhoun. Harrison and Tyler, his associates, were both from Virginia, and Lincoln and Johnson were both from the South. Of these same eighty years, the South had a Chief Justice on the Supreme Court Bench for sixty-three years, or more than three-fourths of the time. The purity and wisdom of these Southern Justices made them the pride of the nation. All the wars, foreign and domestic, have been under the conduct and control
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.36 (search)
ay) I heard two excellent sermons from our regimental chaplain, Reverend Henry D. Moore. We have been on the wing so much recently, the Parson has had little opportunity to preach to us. August 29th A convention of Yankee politicians is to be held at Chicago to-day. I reckon they will spout a good deal about the gal-lorious Union, the best government the world ever saw, the stars and stripes, rebels, traitors, et id omne. Our entire corps was in order of battle all day, and General Breckinridge drove the enemy some distance from his front. The Twelfth Alabama went on picket at night. August 30th Very quiet. The Yanks made no advance. August 31st Another reconnoissance by Rodes' division. General Rodes received orders to drive the Yankees out of Martinsburg, and taking his division of Battle's Alabama, Cook's Georgia, Cox's North Carolina, and Lewis' (formerly Daniel's) North Carolina brigades, started on his errand. Battle's brigade was in front, and was shel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official correspondence of Governor Letcher, of Virginia. (search)
h such efforts justly merit. With sentiments of the highest regard, I remain, Governor, Very faithfully, your friend and servant, J. Bankhead Magruder, Major-General. headquarters first Kentucky brigade, Bowling Green, Kentucky, November 30th, 1861. Colonel — The muskets, I am informed, have reached Nashville. I am in receipt of your communication of November 12th, and am under the greatest obligations for your kindness and attention in the matter. Very truly yours, John C. Breckinridge. Will you be good enough to express my warm thanks to Governor Letcher, to whom I will write in a few days? The guns shall be distributed in his name to my ill-armed brigade. J. C. B. Col. Charles Dimmock, Chief of Ordnance Department, Richmond, Va. Confederate States of America, Treasury Department, Richmond, December 9, 1861. My Dear Sir — With the thanks of Governor Pickens and myself for your prompt and considerate response to our request for arms for South Carolina, I
's Creek. capture of Lexington. Fremont advances. Price retires. Hardee. Kentucky. her people and politics. John C. Breckinridge. other leaders. Simon B. Buckner. political contest. Duplicity. neutrality. secret Union clubs. Unionists pl hand. A youth, who had gathered his honors in opposition to Mr. Clay, succeeded to his unbounded influence. John C. Breckinridge, who drew to himself much of the enthusiasm that had attached to Mr. Clay, was a man of widely different type. Thmediate and remoter kindred were many distinguished for oratory, in the pulpit, at the bar, and in legislative halls. Breckinridge, though never a severe student, had natural gifts that made him a vigorous writer, an agreeable talker, and a ready anncoln's inauguration to preside over the Senate, when he took his seat in that body as Senator from Kentucky. With Breckinridge's powerful hold on all classes in Kentucky, it was in his power, at any time before June 1st, by putting himself at th
Generals. Buell. Kentucky refugees. John C. Breckinridge. the Kentucky Provisional Government. mmediate revolt of the State-rights party. Breckinridge was counseling the people, but with his usuh his command, reached Lexington, to arrest Breckinridge, Preston, and other Southern-rights men. Buion of their escape, or for other reasons. Breckinridge, after a short stay in Richmond, went to Bo III., page 254. In concluding his address, Breckinridge used this language: For those who, deted States for the musket of a soldier. Breckinridge returned to Richmond soon after issuing thiinciple; and this they call treason! In Breckinridge's eloquent peroration, quoted above, there To one inquiring of him what had become of Breckinridge, he replied, He has gone to Richmond to get, on the talents as well as the prestige of Breckinridge. His calmness and reticence, his manly couloh gave him a corps to command, with which Breckinridge made a record that fixed his reputation as [2 more...]
renewed the charge, drove the Federal force from its position, and captured the guns. The batteries, and Farquharson's Forty-first Tennessee, followed the movement. In all this fighting, Graves's battery was splendid in its gallantry and efficiency. Rice E. Graves was a model soldier; inflexible and fervent in duty, a noble Christian and patriot. He left West Point to enlist in the Southern cause, and no man of his years and rank aided it more. He died at his guns at Chickamauga, as Breckinridge's chief of artillery. It was then, at last, that Wallace's brigade, isolated by Buckner's movement on its right and toward its rear, fell back upon its supports, beaten, cut up, and much disordered, but undismayed. Indeed, not only Wallace's command, but squads from all the others, rallied on Thayer's brigade, and, with Cruft's brigade and these fresh troops, interposed another stout barrier to a further Confederate advance. Thayer's brigade formed, under the direction of General
duty or unable to undertake a march. On February 11th, everything being in readiness, the troops began their retreat, Hindman's brigade covering the rear. Breckinridge's command passed through Bowling Green on the 12th, and bivouacked on the night of the 13th two miles north of Franklin. It was on that Thursday night that t and five miles beyond. The Kentuckians retreated sullenly. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, pp. 16-81. General George B. Hodge, then Breckinridge's assistant adjutant-general, in an interesting account of that brigade, mentions that- The spirits of the army were cheered by the accounts which Generale order for retreat was given, and the first intimation the enemy had of the intended evacuation, so far as has been ascertained, was when Generals Hindman and Breckinridge, who were in advance toward his camp, were seen suddenly to retreat toward Bowling Green. The enemy pursued, and succeeded in shelling the town, while Hindman
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