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L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 13 1 Browse Search
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. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mosby. 72. General Joseph E. Johnston. 73. General Hood. 74. General Bragg. 75. Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith. 76. Major-General Price. 77. Major-General A. S. Johnson. 78. Major-General Hardee. 79. Major-General Forrest. 80. Major-General John Morgan. Battle scenes. 81. Battle of Gettysburg. 82. Capture of Lookout mountain. 83. battle of Chapin's farm. 84. Surrender of General Lee. 85. Interview between Generals Sherm
General McPHERSON. 40. General Reynolds. 41. General Wadsworth. 42. General Sumner. 43. General Kearney. 44. General Lyon 45. General Birney. 46. General Mitchell. 47. General Reno. 48. General Grierson 49. General Rousseau. 51. General Wilson. 51. General Kautz. 52. General Stoneman. 63. General Pleasonton. u4. General Gregg. 56. Vice Admiral Farragut. 56. Rear Admiral Porter. 57. rear Admiral Foote. 58. rear Admiral Du Pont. 59 rear Admiral Dahlgren. 60 rear Admiral Goldsborough. 61 Commodore Winslow. 62. Lieutenant-commander Cushing. 63. General R. E. Lee. 64. General Stonewall Jackson. 66. General Ewell. 66. General Beauregard. 67. General Longstreet. 68. General Breckinridge. 69. General A. P. Hill. 70. General Fitzhugh Lee. 71. Colonel Mosby. 72. General Joseph E. Johnston. 73. General Hood. 74. General Bragg. 75. Lieut.-Gen. Kirby Smith. 76. Major-General Price. 77. Major-General A. S. Johnson. 78. Major-General Hardee. 79. Major-General Forrest. 80. Major-General John Morgan.
ion broke out, and when the Southern heart had become fired, this man, living in a strong pro-slavery region, and surrounded by opulent slaveholders-his own family connections and those of his wife being also wealthy and bitter secessionists-very prudently held his peace, feeling his utter inability to stem the tide of the rebellion in his section. This reticence, together with his known Southern birth and relations, enabled him to pass unsuspected, and almost unobserved, at a time when Breckinridge, Marshall, Preston, and Buckner, and other ardent politicians of Kentucky chose the rebellion as their portion, and endeavored to carry with them the State amidst a blaze of excitement. Thus, without tacit admissions or any direct action upon his part, the gentleman of whom we write was classed by the people of his section as a secessionist. Circumstances occurred during that year by which this person was brought into contact with a Federal commander in Kentucky, General Nelson. Thei
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
to the east, like the clouds of a worn out storm. Bragg, ten minutes before, was putting men back in the rifle-pits. His gallant gray was straining a nerve for him now, and the man rode on horseback into Dixie's bosom, who arrayed in some prophet's discarded mantle, foretold on Monday that the Yankees would leave Chattanooga in five days. They left in three, and by way of Mission Ridge, straight over the mountains as their forefathers went! As Sheridan rode up to the guns, the heels of Breckinridge's horse glittered in the last rays of sunshine. The crest was hardly well off with the old love before it was on with the new. But the scene on the narrow plateau can never be painted. As the blue coats surged over its edge, cheer on cheer rang like bells through the valley of the Chickamauga. Men flung themselves exhausted upon the ground. They laughed and wept, shook hands, embraced; turned round and did all four over again. It was as wild as a carnival. Granger was received wi
to the east, like the clouds of a worn out storm. Bragg, ten minutes before, was putting men back in the rifle-pits. His gallant gray was straining a nerve for him now, and the man rode on horseback into Dixie's bosom, who arrayed in some prophet's discarded mantle, foretold on Monday that the Yankees would leave Chattanooga in five days. They left in three, and by way of Mission Ridge, straight over the mountains as their forefathers went! As Sheridan rode up to the guns, the heels of Breckinridge's horse glittered in the last rays of sunshine. The crest was hardly well off with the old love before it was on with the new. But the scene on the narrow plateau can never be painted. As the blue coats surged over its edge, cheer on cheer rang like bells through the valley of the Chickamauga. Men flung themselves exhausted upon the ground. They laughed and wept, shook hands, embraced; turned round and did all four over again. It was as wild as a carnival. Granger was received wi
ed by a mother who, in the time of the Revolution, sent her sons forth to fight for their country with the injunction, Come back to me living or dead, as God may will it, but never with a wound in your backs! There were a considerable number of clergymen in the different generations of the family, and for the most part they belonged to the church militant; men of great logical power, and loving dearly to fight a giant wrong. Among these was the present patriarch of the family, Rev. Robert I. Breckinridge, who, during the war, with all the energy and ability of his great intellect, has fought against secession and rebellion. Such a spirit, too, were many of his kinsmen-such would have been his brother, Rev. John Breckinridge, had he lived to see the day of trial, and such was the spirit of the children of that eminent departed minister. One of these, Judge Samuel Breckinridge, of St. Louis, has been one of the most earnest Union men of that region; a man who has striven earnestl
s, yes; go and take care of the old woman, said the rebel, releasing the man, whose brave and honest truthfulness won the respect of the foe. The other captive was not pleased with the speedy release of his comrade in misfortune. Turning to his captors with the ignoble and malicious spirit which has characterized all of his class, he said, hoping to ingratiate himself with the rebels: Look here! What did you let that fellow go for? He is a black abolitionist. Now I voted for Breckinridge. I have always been opposed to the war. I am opposed to fighting the South decidedly. You are? replied the rebel, contemptuously. You are what they call about here a Copperhead, aren't you? Yes, yes, replied the Copperhead, insinuatingly. That is what all my neighbors call me. They know that I am not with them. Come here, Dave! shouted the rebel to one of his comrades. There is a Copperhead! Just look at him! Now, old man, continued he, turning to the wretch, where do you