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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Congress to the people of the Confederate States: joint resolution in relation to the war. (search)
Semmes, J. L. Orr, A. E. Maxwell, Committee on the part of the Senate. J. W. Clapp, J. L. M. Curry, Julian Hartridge, John Goode, Jr., W. N. H. Smith, Committee of the House of Representatives. Signed by Thomas S. Bocock, Speaker of House of Representatives; Walter Preston, John McQueen, Charles W. Russell, W. Lander, A. H. Conrow, C. J. Munnerlyn, Thomas S. Ashe, O. R. Singleton, J. L. Pugh, A. H. Arrington, Waller R. Staples, A. R. Boteler, Thomas J. Foster, W. R. Smith, Ro. J. Breckinridge, John M. Martin, Porter Ingram, A. H. Garland, E. S. Dargan, D. Funsten, Thomas D. McDowell, J. R. McLean, R. R. Bridgers, G. W. Jones, B. S. Gaither, George W. Ewing, W. D. Holder, Dan. W. Lewis, Henry E. Read, A. T. Davidson, M. H. Macwillie, James Lyons, Caspar W. Bell, R. B. Hilton, Charles J. Villere, J. W. Moore, Lucius J. Dupre, John D. C. Atkins, Israel Welsh, William G. Swan, F. B. Sexton, T. L. Burnett, George G. Vest, Wm. Porcher Miles, E. Barksdale, Charles F. Collier, P.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
sioners from the States of Alabama and Mississippi, and was followed by the Military water-sled. From a war-time sketch. publication of a letter from Vice-President Breckinridge advising the calling of a State convention and urging that the only way to prevent war was for Kentucky to take her stand openly with the slave States. About this time the latter's uncle, the Rev. Dr. Robert J. Breckinridge, an eminent Presbyterian minister, addressed a large meeting at Lexington in favor of the Union. The division of sentiment is further illustrated by the fact that one of his sons, Colonel W. C. P. Breckinridge, followed his cousin into the Confederate army, wre being mainly for the purpose of allowing the Union members of that organization to get rid of the stringent obligations of their enlistment. The Rev. Robert J. Breckinridge, D. D. From a photograph. As in most compromises, the terms of the neutrality compromise were differently interpreted by the parties, but with both t
ogether on June 7, 1864, it had less to do than any other convention in our political history; for its delegates were bound by a peremptory mandate. It was opened by brief remarks from Senator Morgan of New York, whose significant statement that the convention would fall far short of accomplishing its great mission unless it declared for a Constitutional amendment prohibiting African slavery, was loudly cheered. In their speeches on taking the chair, both the temporary chairman, Rev. Robert J. Breckinridge of Kentucky, and the permanent chairman, William Dennison of Ohio, treated Mr. Lincoln's nomination as a foregone conclusion, and the applause which greeted his name showed that the delegates did not resent this disregard of customary etiquette. There were, in fact, but three tasks before the convention to settle the status of contesting delegations, to agree upon a platform, and to nominate a candidate for Vice-President. The platform declared in favor of crushing rebellion
nnon.--(Doc. 132.) Two parties of rebel troops met on the peninsula, above Newport News, Va., and mistook each other for enemies. Brisk firing at once commenced, and a number on each side were killed and wounded before the mistake was found out. Among the killed was Major Bailey, of Mobile.--Memphis Appeal, November 16. The Grand Jury in session at Frankfort, Kentucky, adjourned, having found indictments for treason against thirty-two prominent citizens, among whom were Robert J. Breckinridge, jr., J. C. Breckinridge, Humphrey Marshall, Ben. Desha, and Harry T. Hawkins. Nineteen persons were also indicted for high misdemeanor.--Baltimore American, Nov. 13. Electors for President and Vice-President were chosen throughout the revolted States, and also members of Congress. The Congress is to meet at Richmond on the 18th of February, 1862, and the votes for the two highest offices in the Government will be counted next day.--New York Tribune, November 18. One hundred
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
in the army of the North, while their brother, Major-General George B. Crittenden, served in the army of the South. Of Henry Clay's grandchildren, I recall three who espoused the Federal cause, and four who joined the Southern army. Vice-President Breckinridge and three sons adhered to the South, while his two distinguished cousins, the eminent Presbyterian divines, were uncompromising in their devotion to the Union. The elder, and perhaps more famous of these cousins, Dr. Robert J. BreckinDr. Robert J. Breckinridge, had two sons in the Confederate and two in the Federal army; one of whom (Colonel J. C. Breckinridge, now [1888] of the regular army), in the fierce battle at Atlanta, July 22d, 1864, became a prisoner to his brother, W. C. P. Breckinridge, the present member of Congress, who made as brilliant a record as a soldier as he has since made as a statesman. They passed the night following that sanguinary battle with as much warmth of fraternal affection as though visiting each other from neigh
had, for some years, been a Democratic State--casting her Presidential vote for Buchanan and Breckinridge, in 1856, by some seven thousand majority Burchanan 74,642; Fillmore 67,416; Fremont 314.- his leading competitor, and 11,423 over the combined votes of all Combs 68,165; McClarty (Breckinridge) 44,942; Bolling (Douglas) 10,971; Hopkins (Lincoln) 829. others. If Maj. Breckinridge had bMaj. Breckinridge had been made their candidate for President by the bolters with any idea of thereby seducing the home of Henry Clay from her loyalty, that hope was ill-grounded, as the Presidential election more conclusively demonstrated — Bell and Everett carrying the State by a large plurality. Bell 66,058; Breckinridge 53,143; Douglas 25,651; Lincoln 1,364. Yet her Democratic Governor, Magoffin, Elected in 1; and tendering their services as mediators to effect a just and honorable peace. Rev. Robert J. Breckinridge--always a devoted Unionist, because never a devotee of Slavery — in an address at Cin
ce, repudiated the sweeping policy of confiscation above indicated. Gen. Cochrane demurred to such confiscation, but remitted the question to the wisdom of Congress, when it should be called to act on the subject of Reconstruction. Ultimately, both candidates withdrew from the contest; convinced that title great mass of the popular vote must be divided between the Union and the Democratic tickets. The Union National Convention assembled at Baltimore, Tuesday, June 7. Rev. Robert J. Breckinridge, D. D., of Kentucky, was made temporary and lion. William Dennison, ex-Governor of Ohio, permanent President. All but the incontestably, persistently Rebel States were found to be represented. Hon. Preston King, of N. Y., from the Committee on Credentials, reported in favor of admitting all the delegates claiming seats, but those from South Carolina and the Conservative Unionists from Missouri: the delegations from the Territories, from the District of Columbia, and from the State
The Nashville Banner says that Captain Robert J. Breckinridge, son of the great Presbyterian divine--Rev. Dr. Robert J. Breckinridge--is a candidate in the Eleventh district of Kentucky, for the Congress of the Confederate States. The father and the son, in this instance, are diametrically opposed to each other — the old man being for Lincoln, while the son is for Jeff. Davis. The Nashville Banner says that Captain Robert J. Breckinridge, son of the great Presbyterian divine--Rev. Dr. Robert J. Breckinridge--is a candidate in the Eleventh district of Kentucky, for the Congress of the Confederate States. The father and the son, in this instance, are diametrically opposed to each other — the old man being for Lincoln, while the son is for Jeff. Davi
Wine and Sentiment.-Mrs. C. M. Love returns her grateful thanks to Miss Breckinridge and other kind ladies of Princeton, New-Jersey, for another liberal donation of hospital stores, including a large supply of superior currant-wine, made by a lady of Princeton, with a beautiful, patriotic, Christian sentiment written upon nearly all the bottles, of which the following are specimens: Currant-wine from the old battle-fields of Princeton, New-Jersey. Let no traitor's feet pollute the glorious emblem of our freedom. Soldiers! may the stars which float over your heads point you to heaven, and may you be gathered there in brighter and more enduring clusters. Brave soldiers in Kentucky, fighting for us here, we have been, and are now watching you with intense interest. We grasp the papers to read of your deeds of noble daring, and while rejoicing over them, our tears flow at the toils, the hardships, the sufferings by which they are won. We think of you, we pray for you, and ma
's division, Hardee's corps; a portion of Stewart's division, of Breckinridge's corps; and on the top of the mountain were three brigades of Se distance in my rear. There were in my front the troops of General Breckinridge, forming the left of the enemy's centre. Not much regard to stay the march of loyalty and uphold the cause of treason. Breckinridge's corps was on the left of the enemy's line. Hardee occupied thent the infantry opened fire until late in the evening, when General Breckinridge went to the assistance of Stevenson with a brigade. The Fed veteran troops. The confederate army, under Bragg, Hardee, and Breckinridge, did not number half so many. Longstreet's Virginia divisions, utenant-General Hardee, who commanded on the right, while Major-General Breckinridge commanded on the left. Hardee's command embraced Cleburnal Walker being absent,) Cheatham's, and Stevenson's divisions. Breckinridge's embraced his old division, commanded by Brigadier-General Lewi
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