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ays: A few days more and Bayou Plaquemine will be closed to the Father of Waters. The next question to be solved — How long will the levee, as at present, protect muddy Plaquemine? Look out for a crevasse when the water is high. Brownlow in the field again. Although Brownlow, of the knoxville Whig has of late lost caste, he has not parted yet with his admirable talent for vituperation.--He thus swears at the editor of the Knoxville Register: I have, on more occasions thBrownlow, of the knoxville Whig has of late lost caste, he has not parted yet with his admirable talent for vituperation.--He thus swears at the editor of the Knoxville Register: I have, on more occasions than one, stated to the public that the man in whose name this universally-acknowledged lying and disreputable sheet is edited and published — J. A. Sperry — is a low down, ill-bred, lying, debauched, drunken scoundrel, alone worthy of the company of the villains and cowards who write the dirty, slanderous editorials for his paper, assailing men whom they hypocritically meet upon the streets, shake hands with, and pretend friendship for. These men know that their bad morals and pecuniary exploits <
The Daily Dispatch: October 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], By the Governor of Virginia.--a Proclamation. (search)
llicoffer; but if it delay in the work at all, he must "fall back," and the country be entered by the enemy. The Government cannot afford to permit the great line of railroad running through the country thus threatened, to be one moment imperilled. It cannot afford to lose the support of the brave and liberal people of Southwestern Virginia, where as yet not a single traitor has been found. It cannot afford to admit an army of the enemy into close proximity with East Tennessee, where Brownlow and Andy Johnson have made so many Unionists among a community the most prolific of good soldiers on the continent. The people of East Tennessee, under the admirable policy of General Zollicoffer, and under the influence of the patriotic contact of Southwestern Virginia, are rapidly giving up their Johnsonism and Brownlowism, and warming up with genuine enthusiasm for the South. It is the region, of all others in the Confederacy, from which we may soon expect the largest accessions to our
Suppression of Brownlow's Whig.
Brownlow and his paper. --We published in the Dispatch yesterday the announcement of the suspension of Brownlow's Whig. The following has since come under our observation: "This issue of the Whig must necessarily be the last for some time to come — I am unable to say how long. The Confederate authorities have determiBrownlow's Whig. The following has since come under our observation: "This issue of the Whig must necessarily be the last for some time to come — I am unable to say how long. The Confederate authorities have determined upon my arrest, and I am to be indicted before the Grand Jury of the Confederate Court, which commenced its session in Nashville on Monday last." He says he could go free by taking the oath of allegiance, or by giving bond for his good behavior. But he vows that he will do neither. He says: "In default of bothat the end of a rope, before I will make any humiliating concessions to any power on earth !" The reasons for this anticipated procedure against himself, Brownlow explains thus: "I have committed grave, and, I really fear, unpardonable offences. I have refused to make war upon the Government of the United States; I
Brownlow nearly Matched. --The following extract comes up pretty well to Brownlow in language and spirit, being quite blasphemous: Abolition Brutality.--The Columbus News has information from what are deemed reliable sources, that on the day troops were sent from Paducah to Mayfield, Gen. Smith refused permission to any one to leave Paducah. --Little children, whose parents were in the country — ladies who went to the city to purchase medicine for their sick friends — messengers for Brownlow in language and spirit, being quite blasphemous: Abolition Brutality.--The Columbus News has information from what are deemed reliable sources, that on the day troops were sent from Paducah to Mayfield, Gen. Smith refused permission to any one to leave Paducah. --Little children, whose parents were in the country — ladies who went to the city to purchase medicine for their sick friends — messengers for physicians in cases of emergency, as well as the physicians, were not permitted to depart. Gen. Smith, when supplicated by children, wives, etc., who were anxious to return to their sick parents or families, swore by God, "that if Jesus Christ or God Almighty were in town, they should not leave!" The News asserts that this statement is reliable, incredible as it may seem, and adds that "the blasphemous wretch should be gibbet
Parson Brownlow. --The Nashville Banner, extinguishes the prospect of Parson Brownlow becoming a marty. It says: "A member of the Grand Jury — a gentle man of unquestionable reliability — stated to us on yesterday that the name of BrownlBrownlow becoming a marty. It says: "A member of the Grand Jury — a gentle man of unquestionable reliability — stated to us on yesterday that the name of Brownlow has not been brought before the jury in any manner, much more in connection with his arrest. This statement is due to the Government whose integrity Mr. Brownlow's card would impeach. The noisy Parson, has but to conduct himself with proper discBrownlow has not been brought before the jury in any manner, much more in connection with his arrest. This statement is due to the Government whose integrity Mr. Brownlow's card would impeach. The noisy Parson, has but to conduct himself with proper discretion, that he may dwell in unbroken peace so far as Confederate authority is concerned." t. This statement is due to the Government whose integrity Mr. Brownlow's card would impeach. The noisy Parson, has but to conduct himself with proper discretion, that he may dwell in unbroken peace so far as Confederate authority is concer
Affairs at the South. the Charleston Mercury's correspondent "Kinwah"--Brownlow's card — Congressional representation in the Confederate States, &c., From our Southern exchanges we copy the following paragraphs: Charleston Merublished it." A card from Wm. G.Browslow. Some time ago we published a statement going the rounds that "Parson" Brownlow had suspended the publication of his paper, (the Knoxville Whig,) owing to an apprehension on his part that it was in co denying that any such intention was ever entertained. In its issue of November 5 the Republican publishes a card from Brownlow, from which we make the following extract: More than two weeks ago, a Secessionist, of this city, came home from Naer, on horseback, to try and collect some several hundred dollars due me for advertising. Respectfully, etc. W. G. Brownlow. Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 31, 1861. Congressional representation in the Confederate States. The first Congre
mberland Gap, is probably twice as large. At the same time that we hear of the retreat of Colonel Williams upon Pound Gap, we hear apprehensions expressed for the safety of General Zollicoffer, at Cumberland Gap. The object of the enemy in pushing forward these columns is probably threefold. The chief purpose, doubtless, is to bring into its own support the large disaffected element of the population in East Tennessee, which have been corrupted by the clamor of Andy Johnson, Maynard, Brownlow, and Trigg. The next object of the enemy is, probably, to get possession of the salt- works in the Western corner of Smyth co., where half a million of bushels of salt a year are now manufactured. And last, but not least, the enemy aims at the possession of a portion of the Virginia and Tennessee railroad, so as to cut our direct communication, from the Seat of Government, with Nashville, Memphis, and our armies in Western Kentucky. The clandestine burning of bridges, at a concerted peri
nd turbulent men were bound by every obligation of duty and gratitude at least to desist from acts of resistance and insurrection against the constituted authorities. The sovereign voice of the people of Tennessee had proclaimed her an independent State, and had also united her with the Southern Confederacy. Their first outbreaks of discontent, and even of treason, were not visited by the Government with the punishment it might justly have inflicted. On the contrary, their leading organ, Brownlow's incendiary paper, was permitted week after week and month after month to court in vain the crown of martyrdom. This humane and paternal forbearance, instead of softening their obduracy, has only emboldened them to open acts of ferocity and resistance, until at last they are in armed and organized instruction. Hereafter they will be recognized in the character of truitors and enemies, which they have themselves chosen, and be visited with the chastisement and retribution due to their
if you refuse, prepare to take the field, for I am resolved to exhaust all resources before the foot of the invader shall pollute the soil of Tennessee. Respectfully, Isham G. Harris. Prospects in East Tennessee--Knoxville under martial law — excitement in Chattanooga. The Memphis Avalanche, of the 14th inst., gleans the following information from a conversation had with a gentleman from East Tennessee, in reference to affairs in that section: It is reported that Parson Brownlow had left Knoxville with thirteen guns, and was a sympathizer in the Union movement in that quarter. The town of Knoxville is under martial law. On the night of the insurrection — last Friday--It is said that signal rockets were fired all over the mountains, and about the same time an effort was made to burn all the bridges. Six of the men engaged in the attempt to burn the Strawberry Plains bridge, and who afterwards attempted to murder the watchman, have been arrested, brought to Knoxvil
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