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91. Mrs. Bickerdyke Uses her dresses for the Union soldiers. 92. Union soldiers pursued by bloodhounds. 93. the first Tennessee cavalry Escorting rebel prisoners. 94. the leap for life. 95. the Price of loyalty in East Tennessee. 96. Parson Brownlow's daughter and the rebel soldiers. 97. the scout and the Bloodhound. 98. Old Bradley and his daughter. 99. Bringing home the cows. 100. old Burns, the hero of Gettysburg. 101. the rescue. 102. the country must be saved if it takes every ChRaid .................................. 376 Foraging ........ . ................................. 377 Adventure of a Spy ............................................ 389 The Religious Sentiment in the Army ............................ 394 Parson Brownlow's Daughter and the Rebel Soldiers................ 397 General Banks and the Military Speculators ...................... 398 A Woman's Pluck and Patriotism ......... .. .................... 400 (iving for the Wounded Soldiers....... .............
91. Mrs. Bickerdyke Uses her dresses for the Union soldiers. 92. Union soldiers pursued by bloodhounds. 93. the first Tennessee cavalry Escorting rebel prisoners. 94. the leap for life. 95. the Price of loyalty in East Tennessee. 96. Parson Brownlow's daughter and the rebel soldiers. 97. the scout and the Bloodhound. 98. Old Bradley and his daughter. 99. Bringing home the cows. 100. old Burns, the hero of Gettysburg. 101. the rescue. 102. the country must be saved if it takes every ChRaid .................................. 376 Foraging ........ . ................................. 377 Adventure of a Spy ............................................ 389 The Religious Sentiment in the Army ............................ 394 Parson Brownlow's Daughter and the Rebel Soldiers................ 397 General Banks and the Military Speculators ...................... 398 A Woman's Pluck and Patriotism ......... .. .................... 400 (iving for the Wounded Soldiers....... .............
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Part 2: daring enterprises of officers and men. (search)
he only reinforcement which the Army of the Shenandoah received, or needed to recover its lost field of battle, camps, intrenchments, and cannon was one man-Sheridan. Refusing to volunteer in the rebel army. In the same prison with Parson Brownlow and other Unionists in Tennessee, was a venerable clergyman, named Cate, and his three sons. One of them, James Madison Cate, a most exemplary and worthy member of the Baptist church, was there for having committed no other crime than that of rwith one thickness of a piece of carpet under him, and an old overcoat doubled up for a pillow-and he in the agonies of death. His wife came to visit him, bringing her youngest child, which was but a babe. They were refused admittance. Parson Brownlow here put his head out of the jail window, and entreated them, for God's sake, to let the poor woman come in, as her husband was dying. The jailer at last consented that she might see him for the limited time of fifteen minutes. As she came in,
he only reinforcement which the Army of the Shenandoah received, or needed to recover its lost field of battle, camps, intrenchments, and cannon was one man-Sheridan. Refusing to volunteer in the rebel army. In the same prison with Parson Brownlow and other Unionists in Tennessee, was a venerable clergyman, named Cate, and his three sons. One of them, James Madison Cate, a most exemplary and worthy member of the Baptist church, was there for having committed no other crime than that of rwith one thickness of a piece of carpet under him, and an old overcoat doubled up for a pillow-and he in the agonies of death. His wife came to visit him, bringing her youngest child, which was but a babe. They were refused admittance. Parson Brownlow here put his head out of the jail window, and entreated them, for God's sake, to let the poor woman come in, as her husband was dying. The jailer at last consented that she might see him for the limited time of fifteen minutes. As she came in,
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, Parson Brownlow's daughter and the rebel soldiers. (search)
Parson Brownlow's daughter and the rebel soldiers. After the fraudulent vote for secession in Tennessee, in June, 1861, the rebels began to annoy and insult Parson Brownlow and his family. His house, up to midsummer of that year, floated the American flag, though many an attempt was made to drag it down. Early in June a Louisiana regiment, en route for Virginia, tarried at Knoxville, awaiting transportation over the railway, then crowded beyond its capacity. The parson says, in his recorBrownlow and his family. His house, up to midsummer of that year, floated the American flag, though many an attempt was made to drag it down. Early in June a Louisiana regiment, en route for Virginia, tarried at Knoxville, awaiting transportation over the railway, then crowded beyond its capacity. The parson says, in his record of the events of that year: These mean scoundrels visited the houses of Union men, shouted at them, groaned and hissed. My humble dwelling had the honor to be thus greeted oftener than any other five houses in Knoxville. The Southern papers said they were the flower of their youth. I said to my wife, if this is the flower, God save us from the rabble. Upon one of these occasions nine members of the Louisiana regiment determined to see the flag humbled. Two men were chosen as a c