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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
chmond, April 28, 1861, cited by Whitney in his History of the War for the Union, i. 402. Compare what Stephens said at Milledgeville, in November, 1860, and in the Georgia Convention, in January 1861, pages 54 to 57, inclusive. Stephens, as we have observed, was in Richmond for the purpose of negotiating a treaty for the admission of Virginia into the Southern Confederacy. The Convention appointed Ex-President John Tyler, William Ballard Preston, S. McD. Moore; James P. Holcombe, James C. Bruce, and Lewis E. Harvie, Commissioners to treat with him. They entered upon the business at once, and on the 24th of April agreed to and signed a Convention between the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Confederate States of America, which provided that, until the union of Virginia with the league should be perfected, the whole military force and military operations, offensive and defensive, of said Commonwealth, in the impending conflict with the United States, should be under the chief con
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Virginia, (search)
l of the military authority. At the time appointed for the vote, Senator James M. Mason, author of the fugitive slave law, addressed a letter to the people. declaring that the ordinance of secession absolved them from all allegiance to the United States; that they were bound to support the sacred pledge made to the Confederate States by the treaty of annexation, etc. The Virginia convention had appointed ex-President John Tyler, W. Ballard Preston, S. M. D. Moore, James P. Holcombe, James C. Bruce, and Levi E. Harvie, commissioners to treat with Alexander H. Stephens, Vice-President of the Confederate States of America, for the annexation of Virginia to the Southern Confederacy. Mr. Stephens was clothed with full power to make a treaty to that effect. It was then planned to seize the national capital; and at several places on his way towards Richmond, where he harangued the people, he raised the cry of on to Washington! (q. v.) Troops were pressing towards that goal from the Sou
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 102.--Gov. Letcher's proclamation. (search)
Virginia, on the twenty-fourth day of April, 1861, by Alexander H. Stephens, the duly authorized Commissioner to act in the matter for the said Confederate States, and John Tyler, William Ballard Preston, Samuel McD. Moore, James P. Holcombe, James C. Bruce, and Lewis E. Harvie, parties duly authorized to act in like manner for said Commonwealth of Virginia; the whole subject to the approval and ratification of the proper authorities of both Governments respectively. In testimony whereof, theaid and at the place aforesaid, in duplicate originals. Alexander H. Stephens, [Seal,] Commissioner for Confederate States. John Tyler, [Seal,] Wm. Ballard Preston, [Seal,] S. Mcd. Moore, [Seal,] James P. Holcombe, [Seal,] James C. Bruce, [Seal,] Lewis E. Harvie, [Seal,] Commissioners for Virginia. Approved and ratified by the Convention of Virginia, on the 25th day of April, 1861. John Janney, President. Jno. L. Eubank, Secretary. --National Intelligencer.
nd a grateful posterity. Tread with alacrity, then, the path it points out to you. If it lead perchance to a bloody grave, it is sweet to die for your country, and all coming time will hallow your resting place as the bed of glory. You have seen what a burial has been already accorded to the first martyrs in this war. If you come back victorious — which God grant — a grateful people will know how to honor the brave, and hail your return with thunders of applause. Douglass and the heart of Bruce; Henry of Navarre, on the eve of a tremendous conflict, bade his soldiers look for the crisis of battle where streamed the white plume on his helmet. So let this flag wave wherever ebbs and flows the fiercest tide of war. I need not bid you bring it back with you, for I am sure if you return you will bear this standard in your midst. The Greeks slain in battle were borne home on their shields — it was a dishonor to return without them. Remember, then, the counsel of the Spartan mother to <
ond, Virginia, on the twenty-fourth day of April, 1861, by Alexander H. Stephens, the duly authorized Commissioner to act in the matter for the said Confederate States, and John Tyler, Wm. Ballard Preston, Samuel McD.Moore, James P. Holcombe, James C. Bruce, and Lewis E. Harvie, parties duly authorized to act in like manner for said Commonwealth of Virginia — the whole subject to the approval and ratification of the proper authorities of both Governments respectively. in testimony whereof, ner for Confederate States. John Tyler, [Seal,] Commissioners for Virginia. Wm.Ballard Preston, [Seal,] Commissioners for Virginia. S. McD.Moore [Seal,] Commissioners for Virginia. James P. Holcombe, [Seal,] Commissioners for Virginia. James C. Bruce, [Seal,] Commissioners for Virginia. Lewis E. Harvie, [Seal,] Commissioners for Virginia. Approved and ratified by the Convention of Virginia, on the 25th of April, 1861. John Janney, President. John L. Eubank, Sec'y.
More liberality. While the purse-proud millionaires of New York, who have fattened from the industry of the South, are made to shell out their wealth for the purpose of subjugating a country without whose aid they can not live, it is cheering to find instances on our side of similar liberality, prompted by true patriotism. The Danville Register has good authority for saying that Mr. James C. Bruce, of Halifax, who is known to be one of the wealthiest men of Virginia, has declared his readiness to put at the disposal of his native State his entire pecuniary means, and his intention, if it shall be necessary, to melt his plate, including his spoons, and to lay them on the altar of the blessed old Commonwealth.
nd, Virginia, on the twenty-fourth day of April, 1861, by Alexander H. Stephens, the duly authorized Commissioner to act in the matter for the said Confederate States, and John Tyler, Wm. Ballard Preston, Samuel McD. Moore, James P. Holcombe, James C. Bruce, and Lewis E. Harvie, parties duly authorized to act in like manner for said Commonwealth of Virginia — the whole subject to the approval and ratification of the proper authorities of both Governments respectively. in testimony whereof, phens,[Seal.]Commissioner for Confederate States. John Tyler.[Seal,]Commissioners for Virginia. Wm. Ballard Preston,[Seal,]Commissioners for Virginia. S. McD. Moore,[Seal,]Commissioners for Virginia. James P. Holcombe,[Seal,]Commissioners for Virginia. James C. Bruce.[Seal,]Commissioners for Virginia. Lewis E. Harvie,[Seal,]Commissioners for Virginia. Approved and ratified by the Convention of Virginia, on the 25th of April, 1861. John Janney, President. John L. Eubank, Sec'y.
--The Danville Register, of Thursday, says: We noticed some weeks ago the fact that James C. Bruce, Esq., of Halifax, had pledge his whole fortune to the defence of the State of Virginia and t nobly is he redeeming that pledge. We learn from an intelligent gentleman from Halifax that Mr. Bruce, although is wretched health, is actively engaged in canvasing the county for the purpose of eice at his individual expense. Our informant also mentioned another fact which shows that Mr. Bruce is setting a noble example to other gentleman of great wealth throughout our country. A citizen of the county and a member of the Blackwalnut Troop of Cavalry, visited Mr. Bruce and informed him that he greatly desired to go with this Cavalry company to which he was attached whenever they shhad all his horses brought together, and toll the volunteer to select the one that he thought would suit him best. All honor to James C Bruce, and all like him, if any more such can be found.
Virginia military Institutes. --The Board of Visitors of this institution assembled in Richmond yesterday. Present, James C. Bruce, Esq., President, John Branson, Timas S. Haymond, W. H. Richardson, and R. M. Smith, Esqs. The Board, after consultation, adjourned till this morning.
Virginia military Institute. --The Board of Visitors reassembled in the Capitol yesterday. Present--Messrs. James C. Bruce, President; T. S. Haymond, W. H. Richardson, John Brannon, R. M. Smith, and Samuel S. Williams. The Board, we learn, have decided that the Institute ought to be kept in operation, although several of the Professors — among them the Principal — are in the city. By the way, we carelessly wrote the name of Johnston, instead of Jackson, in speaking of this Institution. It is General T. J. Jackson, of the famous "Stone Wall Brigade," who is a professor in this excellent schoo
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