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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
her passage of troops through the town. Accordingly, the following letter was dispatched to the President: Mayor's Office, Baltimore, April 19th, 1861. Sir:--This will be presented to you by the Hon. H. Lennox Bond, George W. Dobbin, and John C. Brune, Esqs., who will proceed to Washington by an express train, at my request, in order to explain fully the fearful condition of affairs in this city. The people are exasperated to the highest degree by the presence of troops, and the citizens e from the former a letter to the Mayor and Governor, declaring that no troops shall be brought through Baltimore if, in a military point of view, and without interruption from opposition, they can be marched around Baltimore. H. L. Bond, J. C. Brune, G. W. Dobbin. This response of Mr. Lincoln was very unsatisfactory to the people of Baltimore, although it is difficult to see, looking back upon it from this point of time, how Mr. Lincoln could have unreservedly promised that no troops sh
great Union meeting at Bridgeport to-morrow. The Provost-marshal of Baltimore, Md., this morning, before break of day, arrested Mayor Brown, Ross Winans, Charles H. Pitts, Lawrence Sangster, S. T. Wallis, and T. P. Scott, members of the Maryland Legislature, F. H. Howard, editor of the Exchange, and delivered them at Fort McHenry. He also arrested Messrs. Dennison, Quinlan, and Dr. Lynch, members of the Legislature from Baltimore County; Henry M. Warfield, Dr. J. Hansom, Thomas and John C. Brune, members of the Legislature from Baltimore City; also Thomas J. Hall, Jr., editor of the Baltimore South. All the arrests were made pursuant to orders from the United States War Department.--N. Y. Evening Post, September 13. The rebels appeared to-day in large numbers in Shepherdstown, Virginia, and commenced firing on the Unionists on the Maryland side of the Potomac. Several cannon were brought out. When the Unionists, under command of Colonel Anderson, brought two of their gun
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
e's office in the old City Hall. Governor Hicks passed the night of the 19th at the house of Mayor Brown. At eleven o'clock the Mayor, with the concurrence of the Governor, sent a committee, consisting of Lenox Bond, George W. Dobbin, and John C. Brune, to President Lincoln, with a letter, in which he assured the chief magistrate that the people of Baltimore were exasperated to the highest degree by the passage of troops, and that the citizens were universally decided in the opinion that no and more complete. The excitement in Washington was fearful; and at three o'clock on the morning of the 21st (Sunday) the President sent for Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown. The former was not in the city. The latter, with Messrs. Dobbin and Brune, and S. T. Wallis, hastened to Washington, where they arrived at ten o'clock in the morning. At that interview General Scott proposed to bring troops by water to Annapolis, and march them from there, across Maryland, to the Capital, a distance o
n for the preservation of the peace of Maryland. The Mayor replied that Governor Hicks was not in the city, and inquired if he should go alone. Receiving an answer by telegraph in the affirmative, his Honor, accompanied by George W. Dobbin, John C. Brune, and S. T. Wallis, Esqs., whom he had summoned to attend him, proceeded at once to the station. After a series of delays, they were enabled to procure a special train about half-past 7 o'clock, in which they arrived at Washington about ten. road. They will proceed to Harrisburg, from there to Philadelphia, and thence by the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, or by Perrysville, as Major General Patterson may direct. This statement is made by authority of the Mayor, and Messrs. George W. Dobbin, John C. Brune, and S. T. Wallis, who accompanied Mr. Brown, and who concurred with him in all particulars in the course adopted by him in the two interviews with Mr. Lincoln. George Wm. Brown, Mayor. --National Intelligencer, April 23
Doc. 138.-President Lincoln's letter to the Maryland authorities. Washington, April 20, 1861. Governor Hicks and Mayor Brown: Gentlemen: Your letter by Messrs. Bond, Dobbin and Brune, is received. I tender you both my sincere thanks for your efforts to keep the peace in the trying situation in which you are placed. For the future, troops must be brought here, but I make no point of bringing them through Baltimore. Without any military knowledge myself, of course I must leave details to General Scott. Ho hastily said this morning, in presence of these gentlemen, March them around Baltimore, and not through it. I sincerely hope the general, on fuller reflection, will consider this practical and proper, and that you will not object to it. By this a collision of the people of Baltimore with the troops will be avoided, unless they go out of the way to seek it. I hope you will exert your influence to prevent this. Now and ever, I shall do all in my power for peace, cons
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: Maryland's First patriotic movement in 1861. (search)
en the two States. The legislature had been elected in 1859 and was charged with no mandate for revolutionary times. Ten members from Baltimore were elected at a special election held in that city on the 24th, in the place of the delegation returned as elected in 1859, but unseated on account of fraud and violence at the election. The new members were the leading men of the town—merchants, lawyers, representatives of the great business of commerce and trade of a great city. They were John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. Mason Morfit, S. Teakle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts, William G. Harrison, and Lawrence Langston. It was evident in twenty-four hours that conservatism would rule the councils of the general assembly, as it had done those of the governor, and that all the influence of that body would be exerted against any action by the State looking toward taking part in the revolution, which it was clear, was upon the whole country.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
e annoying to the authorities, they determined to suppress the one and thus silence the other. On September 12, 1861, Major-General Dix, commanding in Baltimore, ordered the arrest of the members of the legislature from Baltimore City and the mayor and other obnoxious persons who annoyed him with talk, to-wit: George William Brown, Coleman Yellott, Senator Stephen P. Dennis, Charles H. Pitts, Andrew A. Lynch, Lawrence Langston, H M. Morfit, Ross Winans, J. Hanson Thomas, W. G. Harrison, John C. Brune, Robert M. Denison, Leonard D. Quinlan, Thomas W. Renshaw, Henry May, member of Congress from the Fourth congressional district, Frank Key Howard, editor of the Baltimore Exchange, and Thomas W. Hall, editor of the South. The arrests were made with great secrecy, and it was intended to send them to the Dry Tortugas, but there being no steamer fit for the voyage in Hampton Roads, they were dispatched to Fort Warren in Boston harbor. Liberty of the press as well as free speech had gone
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
left that just as it was, to the care of S. Teakle Willis, John Hanson Thomas, Ross Winans, John C. Brune, and the rest of the Baltimore Delegation in the legislature, which was in Frederick, in sesat that time, there would be great disturbances and bloodshed. Judge Bond, G. W. Dobbin and John C. Brune were sent to Washington to beg the President to stop the transmission of troops through Balto desired the Governor, but he was not in the city, and so the Mayor went; George W. Dobbin, John C. Brune and S. T. Wallis accompanying him at his request. The special train left Baltimore at 7:30 ng: Be calm and do nothing until you hear from me again. Having dispatched this, Messrs. Brown, Brune, Wallis and Dobbin returned in haste to the President and exhibited to him Mr. Garrett's dispatc delegation as the city never sent the General Assembly before or since. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
ad come through the city at that time, there would be great disturbances and bloodshed. Judge Bond, G. W. Dobbin and John C. Brune were sent to Washington to beg the President to stop the transmission of troops through Baltimore, but he gave them nyland. The President also desired the Governor, but he was not in the city, and so the Mayor went; George W. Dobbin, John C. Brune and S. T. Wallis accompanying him at his request. The special train left Baltimore at 7:30 and arrived in Washingtonpatch to Mr. Garrett saying: Be calm and do nothing until you hear from me again. Having dispatched this, Messrs. Brown, Brune, Wallis and Dobbin returned in haste to the President and exhibited to him Mr. Garrett's dispatch, which gave the Presidepposition. It was such a delegation as the city never sent the General Assembly before or since. It was composed of John C. Brune, Ross Winans, Henry M. Warfield, J. Hanson Thomas, T. Parkin Scott, H. M. Morfit, S. Teackle Wallis, Charles H. Pitts
of Delegates were also visited, and those gentlemen arrested: Wm. G. Harrison, Lawrence Sangston. S. Teackle Wallis, T. P. Scott, Henry M. Morfit, Ross Winans, and Henry M. Warfield. The city residence of Dr. J. Hanson Thomas was visited, but he was in the country, and escaped until his return to the city yesterday morning, when he was taken into custody. Charles H. Pitts, Esq., was also in the country, but was arrested yesterday morning soon after reaching the city. The residence of John C. Brune, Esq., on Catharine street, was visited, but he was absent at the time, and up to late last night had not returned, and thus escaped arrest. Dr. A. A. Lynch, of the Senate, and L. G. Quinlan and Robert M. Denison, of the House of Delegates, from Baltimore county, were arrested yesterday morning. The carriage in which Mr. Quinlan was brought to the city showed marks of rough usage, nearly all the glass having been broken. When he reached the office of the Provost Marshal, he pushed
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