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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 17, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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ed down this morning, and is now lying between the two. They will make rich prizes in case they are seized, their cargoes being worth, at present market prices, not much short of ninety thousand dollars each. The amount of duties paid on their inward and outward cargoes to Jeff. Davis's Collector of the Port, was two thousand five hundred dollars; in the capture of two thousand one hundred and fifty dollars of which, together with the Collector himself, I was fortunate enough to assist Captain Buffon some four weeks ago. The capture of Fort Macon gives Gen. Burnside what he has so long needed, a port of entry and a good harbor for heavy — draft vessels. The transports, gunboats, and store — ships will no longer need to run the gauntlet of Hatteras Inlet and the Swash; for at Beaufort they tie up at the railroad-wharf in three fathoms water within half an hour after crossing the bar. Four locomotives and one hundred cars, ordered some time ago by Capt. Briggs, Chief Quartermaster
. The clearness with which distant objects were depicted caused observers to speak of it in exalted terms beyond any reasonable belief. Abulfeda, the geographer, who wrote 1,000 years subsequently, states that it was made of Chinese iron, which Buffon supposes was steel, but was more probably one of the white alloys for which China was and is so famous. Probably nearly allied to speculum-metal. The ancients knew, — 1. That the rays of light were projected in straight lines. 2. That tommon focus. The diameter was 34 1/2 inches, the focus 22 1/2 inches distant. It vitrified brick in 1 second, and melted gold in 30 seconds. Zeicher formed his mirrors by pressing disks on a hot convex former, to give them their curvature. Buffon constructed a combination of 140 plane mirrors, each 4 × 3 inches, on a wooden frame 6 feet square. Three set screws to each mirror gave perfect adjustability, and the result was a vindication of the probability of the statement in regard to Arc
, — not so very long after the good burgher of Magdeburg had set the ball rolling again. What Archimedes did for the fleet of Marcellus at Syracuse, 212 B. C., Proclus did for the ships of Vitalian at Constantinople some 700 years afterward, and Buffon performs the same feats with burning mirrors in a peaceable way, about the middle of the last century, upon metals, green wood, and various intractable minerals. See page 410. In 1810, Medhurst took out a patent in England for a means of convlustration, the lens is shown with a central piece surrounded by four segments which are encircled by eight segments. The object is to obtain lenses of large size for lighthouses, free from defects, and having but slight spherical aberration. Buffon first suggested the idea. Brewster made them. See burning-glass; burning-mirror, pages 410, 411; Mir-Ror, page 1452. Polyzonal lens. Pom′el. A boss or knob on the summit of a turret roof. Pommel. 1. (Saddlery.) A knob on the fr
yes' eye-speculum. c, Hart's eye-speculum. 2. (Optics.) A metallic, concave mirror. These were known to the ancients, and were probably used for lighting the sacred fires. The construction of the mirrors of Archimedes is not accurately known. It need not be doubted that he fired some of the vessels of Marcellus, who was then besieging Syracuse. The wonder is not that an arrangement of burning mirrors, so called, should be able to effect this, for this has been clearly proved by Buffon and others, but the wonder arises from our mis-preconceptions of the condition and talents of the men of former times. Kircher went to the historic spot and tried an arrangement of plane mirrors, which convinced him the account was entirely probable. Tiemann's eye-speculums. The ancients also used lens and glass spheres filled with water to collect and concentrate the rays of the sun. See lens. During the siege of Byzantium by the navy of Vitalian, the same defense was made by th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
n. In England, where his affections strike such deep root that he considers establishing there his permanent abode, he is in relationship, more or less intimate, with Mandeville, Paine, Priestley, Price, Adam Smith, Robertson, Hume, Joseph Banks, Bishop Watson, Bishop Shipley, Lord Kames, Lord Shelburne, Lord Howe, Burke, and Chatham. Among Frenchmen he numbers on his list of admiring friends Vergennes, Lafayette, Mirabeau, Turgot, Quesnay, La Rochefoucauld-Liancourt, Condorcet, Lavoisier, Buffon, D'Alembert, Robespierre, and Voltaire. It is absurd to speak of one who has been subjected to the moulding of such forces as a product of the provinces. All Europe has wrought upon and metamorphosed the Yankee printer. The man whom Voltaire kisses is a statesman, a philosopher, a friend of mankind, and a favourite son of the eighteenth century. With no softening of his patriotic fibre or loss of his Yankee tang, he has acquired all the common culture and most of the master characteristi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
87-292, 293, 295, 307, 308, 313 Brown, David Paul, 223 n., 224--John, 344 Brown, T. A., 227 n. Browne, Sir, Thomas, 104, 322 Browning, 261, 264, 266, 268, 274 Brownson, Orestes A., 333 Bruce, P. A., 216 n. Brutus, 220, 224 Bryant, Dr., Peter, 263 n. Bryant, W. C., 150, 163, 180, 183, 212, 240, 260-278, 279, 280, 281, 282, 283 Buccaneer, the, 278 Buch, Leopold von, 187 Buckingham, J. S., 190 Buckingham, J. T., 236 n. Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 330 Buffon, 91 Bulkeley, Peter, 349 Bunce, Oliver, 226 Bunker Hill, 226 Bunyan, John, 109 Burgoyne, 100, 144 Burk, 192 Burk, John, 224, 226 Burke, Charles, 231 Burke, Edmund, 91, 99, 141, 200, 212, 277 Burnaby, Rev., Andrew, 205, 206 Burnett, J. G., 226 Burns, 283 Burr, Aaron, 247 Burr, Rev., Aaron, 65 Burroughs, Edward, 8 Burroughs, John, 271 Burton, R., II, 93 Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173,
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Augusta King. (search)
as he falls, and the river smiles that he comes to her unharmed. It is the old instinct that peopled nature with the graceful forms of naiad, dryad, and oread. Thus imperfectly, with all our strivings, do we spell out the literature of God, as Margaret Fuller eloquently calls creation . A truce with my Orphic sayings! Here am I well nigh thirty-nine years old, and cannot for the life of me talk common sense. What shall I do to place myself in accordance with the received opinions of mankind? if I had been a flower or a bird, Linnaeus or Audubon might have put me into some order; if I had been a beaver or an antelope, Buffon might have arranged me. One would think that being a woman were more to the purpose than either; for if to stand between two infinities and three immensities, as Carlyle says (the two infinities being cooking done and to be done, and the three immensities being making, mending, and washing), if this won't drive poetry out of a mortal, I know not what will.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
eign misrepresentations of America; and with this in view he cast his material into the form of letters and topical essays addressed to an imaginary Englishman. Thomas Jefferson's Notes on Virginia (1786) has these points in common with Dwight's Travels: it purports to answer questions asked by a foreigner; it gives information about the constitution and laws, religion and manners, public revenue and expense, manufactures, commerce, money, histories, and memorials; it refutes the views of Buffon and of the Abbe Raynal upon the bad climate and soil of America, and upon the degeneracy of its animals and men. (See also Book II, Chap. I.) An immediate predecessor of Dwight in this genre was Ezra Stiles, who bequeathed to Dwight his Literary diary, and whose Itineraries Dwight may well have seen in Ms. Investigation would probably show that Dwight owed much to Jefferson and to Stiles. These definite purposes do not prevent the book from being an omnium gatherum. For Dwight does not
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
9, 281, 282, 284, 285 Brownie books, 408 Browning, Elizabeth Barrett, 252 Browning, Robert, 137, 245 Brown of Ossawatomie, 279 Brownson, Rev. Orestes A., 166 Brownson's quarterly review, 166 Brown University, 219 Bruns, J. D., 308, 309, 311 Bryant, William Cullen, 40, 65, 164, 167, 173, 174, 241, 266, 268, 275, 280, 303 Bryant's minstrels, 291 Buchanan, Robert, 271 Bucke, R. M., 272 Buckminster, Rev., Joseph, 206 Buckminster, Rev., Joseph Stevens, 197, 207 Buffon, 201 n. Bugle echoes, 303 Building Eras in religion, 213 Building of the ship, the, 39 Bulletin Universel, 209 Bunner, Henry Cuyler, 242, 243-244, 376, 385, 386, 388 Bunyan, John, 18 Burk, John D., 106 Burke, Aedanus, 180 Burke, Edmund, 96, 99, 104, 203 Burke, William, 56 Bums, Robert, 44, 50, 353 Burns, 45 Burr, Aaron, 200 Burroughs, John, 236, 262 n., 271 Burton, W. E., 59 Burton's gentleman's magazine, 59, 63, 68 Bury them, 284 Bushnell, Horace, 207,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, Literature as an art. (search)
ore the writer, when he adopts a high aim, must be a law to himself, bide his time, and take the risk of discovering, at last, that his life has been a failure. His task is one in which failure is easy, when he must not only depict the truths of Nature, but must do this with such verisimilitude as to vindicate its truth to other eyes. And since this recognition may not even begin till after his death, we can see what Rivarol meant by his fine saying, that genius is only great patience, and Buffon, by his more guarded definition of genius as the aptitude for patience. Of all literary qualities, this patience has thus far been rarest in America. Therefore, there has been in our literature scarcely any quiet power; if effects are produced, they must, in literature as in painting, be sensational, and cover acres of canvas. As yet, the mass of our writers seek originality in mere externals; we think, because we live in a new country, we are unworthy of ourselves if we do not America
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