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G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army, Appendix. Oration at West Point. (search)
gray head serene and cheerful where death most revelled, who more than once told me that he believed and hoped that his long career would end amid the din of battle: he died at home from the effects of the hardships of his campaigns. That most excellent soldier, the elegant C. F. Smith, whom many of us remember to have seen so often on this plain, with his superb bearing, escaped the bullet to fall a victim to the disease which has deprived the army of so many of its best soldiers. John Buford, cool and intrepid; Mitchel, eminent in science; Plummer, Palmer, and many other officers and men, lost their lives by sickness contracted in the field. But I cannot close this long list of glorious martyrs without paying a sacred debt of official duty and personal friendship. There was one dead soldier who possessed peculiar claims upon my love and gratitude. He was an ardent patriot, an unselfish man, a true soldier, the beau ideal of a staff officer: he was my aide-de-camp, Colone
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
rode on about a mile, keeping a little behind the skirmishers; General Buford and his Staff being just ahead and to the left. To the left we of us, and then hm-m-why-z-z-z, bang! went the shell, right by General Buford's Staff, taking the leg off a poor orderly. Much pleased with d the soldiers all running to buy newspapers. Yesterday came General Buford, commander of the second Cavalry Division, and held a pow-wow. the right, by Brentsville, to Fairfax Station, under escort of General Buford's division. How these huge trains are moved over roads not fitey may not. I think I was never so well and strong in my life. General Buford came in to-day, cold and tired and wet; Oh! said he to me, do tables. . . . Headquarters Army of the Potomac November 1, 1863 Buford was here last night, and said he thought he could just boolge acrosl continue with us. Yesterday we took them, with a small escort, to Buford's Headquarters beyond Culpeper. By Brandy Station we came across a
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
ld Harbor, 146; at Petersburg, 165, 170, 174; death of, 266. Blake, Peleg W., 169. Blunt, —, Miss., 76. Boissac,,----de, 254. Boleslaski,----Austrian officer, 20. Bonaparte, Napoleon, 114. Bootekoff, —, 62. Botiano, —, 308, 311. Botts, John Minor, 46, 82. Boydton plank road, 293, 347. Bradley, Joseph P., 315. Breckinridge, John Cabell, 136. Brevets, distribution of, 257, 289. Briscoe, James C., 82. Brockenbrough, Mrs., 131. Brooks, William Thomas Harbaugh, 148. Buford, John, 15, 40, 50; described, 21; advice to a volunteer aide, 35. Bullets, explosive, 102. Burnside, Ambrose Everett, 87, 91, 93, 94, 96, 97, 106, 108, 110, 114, 128, 134, 140, 211; at church, 120; corps incorporated, 127; at Smith's, 149; at Petersburg, 164, 167, 168, 197; mine, 199, 200, 310. Bushwhacking, 295. Butler, Benjamin Franklin, 118; orders demonstration, 68; Petersburg and, 160; described, 192; Smith and, 192; visit to, 193, 204, 279; sharpshooters and, 205; Dutch Gap ca<
A company, composed of sixty-five men, bearing the name of Bedford Yankee-Catchers, was organized at Lisbon, Bedford County, Va., and the following officers were elected: Captain, John Buford; 1st Lieut., W. D. Williams; 2d Lieut., David Garrett; 3d Lieut., W. H. Hatcher; Orderly Sergeant, Robert Garrett. The. Yankee-Catchers will report and be ready to enter service in a few days.--Richmond Examiner, May 18.
son's River, as a support to the cavalry of Gen. Buford, in front of him. Gen. Bayard, with four rein, about half-way between Generals Bayard and Buford, was established a signal-station, which overl from the direction of Madison Court-House, Gen. Buford having reported to me very early on the mor in my rear. I may be cut off. (Signed) John Buford, Brigadier-General. Received by signal, 8 Aneral Sigel: Your dispatch just received. General Buford is at Fayetteville, and will watch any movore he retired from that place last night, and Buford says the fords near Waterloo are bad. I have de: An intelligent negro has just come in to Gen. Buford from White Plains, and reports the advance n's story is evidently to be relied upon. General Buford says his statements are confirmed by his so me by Gen. Pope to have been destroyed by Gen. Buford, but which we found on our arrival to be ind on my right except the cavalry brigade of Gen. Buford, which was encamped four miles behind us, o[22 more...]
nday, the heat being so terrible that severe work was not possible. On Monday night the enemy fled from the field, leaving many of his dead unburied, and his wounded on the ground and along the road to Orange Court-House, as will be seen from Gen. Buford's despatch. A cavalry and artillery force under Gen. Buford was immediately thrown forward in pursuit, and followed the enemy to the Rapidan, over which he passed with his rear-guard by ten o'clock in the morning. The behavior of Gen. Banks'Gen. Buford was immediately thrown forward in pursuit, and followed the enemy to the Rapidan, over which he passed with his rear-guard by ten o'clock in the morning. The behavior of Gen. Banks's corps during the action was very fine. No greater gallantry and daring could be exhibited by any troops. I cannot speak too highly of the ceaseless intrepidity of Gen. Banks himself during the whole of the engagement. He was in the front, and exposed as much as any man in the command. His example was of the greatest benefit, and he merits and should receive the commendation of his government. Generals Williams, Augur, Gorman, Crawford, Prince, Green, and Geary, behaved with conspicuous g
se, from the advance of the enemy, and from Gen. Buford, who also reported the enemy advancing in h infantry, and about two thousand cavalry--General Buford, with the cavalry force under his command,ommands. A strong cavalry force, under Generals Buford and Bayard, pursued the enemy to the Rapirloo Bridge. By noon of the twenty-fourth, Gen. Buford reported to me that he had occupied Waterlo in my rear. I may be cut off. (Signed) John Buford, Brigadier-General. Received by signal, 8 Aneral Sigel: Your dispatch just received. General Buford is at Fayetteville, and will watch any movhe bridge behind them. Early this morning General Buford reached Waterloo Bridge, which was defenden's story is evidently to be relied upon. General Buford says his statements are confirmed by his sistance of each other. The cavalry under Gen. Buford will follow and cover the march of the thre be on my right with the cavalry brigade of Gen. Buford, and Gen. Banks on my left. Soon afterwa[19 more...]
other duties falling to officers at frontier posts, far distant from railroad or telegraph, all tended to temper and sharpen the blades that were to point the path of glory to thousands destined to ride under the war-guidons of Sheridan, Stuart, Buford, Pleasonton, Fitzhugh Lee, Stanley, Wilson, Merritt, Gregg, and others — all graduates of the service school of the Plains. At the outbreak of the Civil War, the military conditions in the two sections were very unequal. The South began the ser of the month, in efforts to penetrate the cavalry screen which protected each army in its northward progress, culminating on the first day of July at Gettysburg in the masterly handling of two small brigades of cavalry. It was here that General Buford delayed the advance of a division of Confederate infantry for more than two hours, winning for himself, in the opinion of a foreign military critic, The Comte de Paris in The Civil War in America. the honor of having with the inspiration
eadquarters had been on Fleetwood Hill from which, however, he had, luckily, removed his baggage at an early hour. General Buford's force of Federal cavalry which crossed at Beverly Ford was, in the opinion of all of us, quite enough to satisfy the Confederate army, waiting for the waters to fall. Cavalry engagements, of more or less severity, with the divisions of Buford and Kilpatrick, took place at Boonesboro, Beaver Creek, Funkstown, and in A restful scene at General McDowell's headquing its way with celerity and vigor toward Culpeper, captured three guns of the Confederate horse artillery. On the 22d, Buford encountered Stuart at Jack's shop, in Madison County, and a fierce engagement occupied the divisions of both Buford and KBuford and Kilpatrick, with the result that Stuart withdrew across the Rapidan. In October, General Lee entered upon what is known as the Bristoe campaign, which aimed at turning the right flank of the Federal army in Culpeper County. To cover this movement,
of small cavalry battles. On September 16th the Army of the Potomac crossed the Rappahannock and took position near Culpeper Court House. During the next few weeks the cavalry was actively engaged in reconnoitering duty. On October 10th General John Buford was sent across the Rappahannock with the First Cavalry Division (consisting of the Eighth Illinois, Twelfth Illinois, four companies Third Indiana, six companies Eighth New York, Sixth New York, Ninth New York, Seventeenth Pennsylvania, and Third West Virginia, two companies) to uncover, if possible, the upper fords of the river. Buford forced a passage over the Germanna Ford, and bivouacked that night at Morton's Ford, where he recrossed the Rapidan and engaged a body of the enemy. At daylight on October 14th, the Confederates attacked Gregg's Second Cavalry Division, but he held his position tenaciously while General Warren got the Second Corps across Cedar Run. It seldom took over a few hours to rebuild one of these bridge
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