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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 26 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 4 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., General Polk and the battle of Belmont. (search)
oy in the direction of Cairo. General Polk was mistaken in concluding that all the Federal force had reembarked. The 27th Illinois regiment, whose colonel, N. B. Buford, was one of Polk's old West Point friends, had been separated from the rest of the command in the hurry of the retreat, and, taking a road that lay some little The Union forces engaged at Belmont, Mo., under Brig.-Gen. U. S. Grant, were composed of the First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John A. McClernand: 27th Illinois, Col. N. B. Buford; 30th Illinois, Col. Philip B. Fouke; 31st Illinois, Col. John A. Logan; Dollins' Co. Illinois Cavalry, Capt. J. J. Dollins; Delano's Co. Illinois Cavalry, Lhis wife, dated November 12th, General Polk says: I and others of my officers have spent pretty much the whole day in my boat on the river with Buford [Colonel N. B. Buford, 27th Illinois] and his officers, discussing the principles of exchange, and other matters connected with the war. He is as good a fellow as ever lived, an
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
of the port side on which there was no iron plating, to protect the magazine. It was truly said that the Carondelet at that time resembled a farmer's wagon prepared for market. The engineers led the escape-steam, through the pipes aft, into the wheel-house, to avoid the puffing sound it made when blown through the smoke-stacks. All the necessary preparations having been made, I informed the flag-officer of my intention to run the gauntlet that night, and received his approval. Colonel N. B. Buford, who commanded the land forces temporarily with the flotilla, assisted me in preparing for the trip, and on the night of the 4th brought on board Captain Hottenstein, of the 42d Illinois, and twenty-three sharp-shooters of his command, who volunteered their services, which were gratefully accepted. Colonel Buford remained on board until the last moment, to encourage us. I informed the officers and crew of the character of the undertaking, and all expressed a readiness to make the ve
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. (search)
, Capt. Samuel De Golyer; C, 1st Ill., Capt. Charles Houghtaling; F, 2d U. S., Lieut. John A. Darling, Lieut. D. P. Walling. unassigned troops: Engineer Regt. of the West, Col. Josiah W. Bissell; 22d Mo., Lieut.-Col. John D. Foster; 2d Iowa Cav., Col. W. L. Elliott; 2d Ill. Cav. (4 cos.), Lieut.-Col. Harvey Hogg; 4th U. S. Cav. (3 cos.), Lieut. M. J. Kelly; 1st U. S. Infantry (6 cos.), Capt. George A. Williams. Loss of latter regiment: k, 2; w, 5; m, 1--8. flotilla Brigade, Col. Napoleon B. Buford: 27th Ill., Lieut.-Col. F. A. Harrington; 42d Ill., Col. George W. Roberts; 15th Wis., Col. Hans C. Heg; G, 1st Ill. Artillery, Capt. Arthur O'Leary; G, 2d. Ill. Artillery, Capt. Frederick Sparrestrom. Union naval forces at Island number10. Flag-Officer A. H. Foote: Benton (flag-ship), Lieut.-Comr. S. L. Phelps; St. Louis, Lieut.-Comr. Leonard Paulding Cincinnati, Comr. R. N. Stembel; Pittsburgh, Lieut.-Comr. Egbert Thompson; Mound City, Comr. A. H. Kilty; Carondelet, Comr. Henr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
withstanding General Pope's orders to move on Manassas with his whole command. But for this, the movement on Manassas as ordered in the morning, as well as the movement on Centreville as ordered in the afternoon, would have left no troops except Buford's broken down cavalry between Longstreet and Jackson, or between Longstreet and Pope's left.--Editors.), Sigel's corps, and Reynolds's division, all under command of McDowell. On the east of him, and with the advance of Kearny nearly in contact and a half ago, under which Porter was marching toward Gainesville when McDowell joined him near Manassas Junction. After receiving the joint order, General McDowell again joined Porter, at the front, and showed him a dispatch just received from Buford, dated 9:30 A. M., and addressed to Ricketts. It appears to have escaped notice that this dispatch was forwarded by Ricketts to McDowell at 11:30 A. M., which fixes the time of the meeting between Generals McDowell and Porter at the front as aft
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
p, said old Tom. I am glad that no one but my own flesh and blood had a hand in my drubbing. The sons of the South struck her many heavy blows. Farragut, of Tennessee, rose, as a reward of merit, to the highest rank in the Federal navy. A large number of his associates were from the South. In the Federal army there were of Southern blood and lineage Generals Thomas, Sykes, Reno, Newton, J. J Reynolds, Canby, Ord, Brannan, William Nelson, Crittenden, Blair, R. W. Johnson, T. J. Wood, N. B. Buford, Terrill, Graham, Davidson, Cooke, Alexander, Getty, French, Fremont, Pope, Hunter. Some of these doubtless served the South better by the side they took; most of them were fine, and some superb, officers. Moreover, the South had three hundred thousand of her sons in the Federal army in subordinate capacities. According to a printed statement dated at the Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, November 9th, 1880, the slave-holding States furnished troops to the Union army as follow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The case of Fitz John Porter. (search)
ield. A new court has been ordered, and they are to be tried and the grounds of your charges to be fully investigated. On November 25th, 1862, the military commission, having simply met and adjourned, was dissolved and the court-martial appointed. General Porter was now placed in arrest. As finally constituted the court consisted of Major-Generals David Hunter and E. A. Hitchcock, and Brigadier-Generals Rufus King, B. M. Prentiss, James B. Ricketts, Silas Casey, James A. Garfield, N. B. Buford, and J. P. Slough, with Colonel Joseph Holt, Judge-Advocate-General of the Army, as Judge-Advocate. The charges exhibited to the court were found to have been preferred by Brigadier-General Benjamin S. Roberts, Inspector-General on General Pope's staff at the time of the occurrences. The first charge, laid under the ninth article of war, alleged five instances of disobedience of orders ; the second charge, laid under the fifty-second article of war, contained four allegations covering
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
works. Hence Hamilton's movement, the brigades advancing en ├ęchelon, would enable the right of Buford's brigade to far out-lap the enemy's left, and pass toward the enemy's rear with little or no oper into the thickets, and had a fierce fight with the enemy's left, creating a great commotion. Buford's brigade had started in too far to the west and had to rectify its position; so that Hamilton'sn ordered some time previously to move toward the enemy's left in preparation for an attack, and Buford's brigade was now ordered down on Sullivan's right to support him. The brigades were some dist, and having been concealed in the woods had not been discovered by the enemy. The moment that Buford began to move a detached force of the enemy was seen some distance in his front. They opened onsion, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Hamilton. Escort: C, 5th Mo. Cavalry. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Napoleon B. Buford: 48th Ind., Lieut. Col. De Witt C. Rugg (w), Lieut. James W. Archer; 59th Ind., Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
d move down in that direction. The enemy's left did not much overpass the right of Davies, and but few troops were on the line of the old Confederate works. Hence Hamilton's movement, the brigades advancing en ├ęchelon, would enable the right of Buford's brigade to far out-lap the enemy's left, and pass toward the enemy's rear with little or no opposition, while the other brigade could press back the enemy's left, and by its simple advance drive him in and attack his rear. Hamilton told Colohe enemy's left; and after moving down a short distance Sullivan's brigade, facing to the west, crossed the narrow flats flanking the railway, went over into the thickets, and had a fierce fight with the enemy's left, creating a great commotion. Buford's brigade had started in too far to the west and had to rectify its position; so that Hamilton's division thus far had only given the enemy a terrific scare, and a sharp fight with one brigade. Had the movement been executed promptly after 3 o'c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hamilton's division at Corinth. (search)
ity of the above is apparent. I construed it as an order for attack, and at once proceeded to carry it out. Sullivan's brigade of my division had been ordered some time previously to move toward the enemy's left in preparation for an attack, and Buford's brigade was now ordered down on Sullivan's right to support him. The brigades were some distance apart, and having been concealed in the woods had not been discovered by the enemy. The moment that Buford began to move a detached force of thBuford began to move a detached force of the enemy was seen some distance in his front. They opened on him with a single piece of artillery, and he, taking it for granted he was beset by the enemy in force, moved to his front to drive them out of the way. In thus moving he went almost in an opposite direction to the one necessary to support Sullivan. I sent an officer with a positive order to change his course. His reply was, Tell General Hamilton, the enemy is in my front and I am going to fight him. Meantime his brigade had been mo
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
. Mower (w): 26th Ill., Maj. Robert A. Gillmore; 47th Ill., Col. William. A. Thrush (k), Capt. Harman Andrews (w), Capt. Samuel R. Baker; 5th Minn., Col. Lucius F. Hubbard; 11th Mo., Maj. Andrew J. Weber; 8th Wis., Lieut.-Col. George W. Robbins (w), Maj. John W. Jefferson (w), Capt. William B. Britton; 2d Iowa Battery, Capt. Nelson T. Spoor. Brigade loss: k, 48; w, 248; m, 26 = 322. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Charles S. Hamilton. Escort: C, 5th Mo. Cavalry. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Napoleon B. Buford: 48th Ind., Lieut. Col. De Witt C. Rugg (w), Lieut. James W. Archer; 59th Ind., Col. Jesse I. Alexander; 5th Iowa, Col. Charles L. Matthies; 4th Minn., Col. John B. Sanborn; 26th Mo., Lieut.-Col. John H. Holman (w); M, 1st Mo. Art'y, Lieut. Junius W. MacMurray 11th Ohio Battery, Lieut. Henry M. Neil. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 48 = 55. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jeremiah C. Sullivan, Col. Samuel A. Holmes: 56th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Green B. Raum; 10th Iowa, Maj. Nathaniel McCalla; 17th