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ent in the struggle for independence, whom General Johnston characterizes as one of the best officers and patriots in the army, writes from Nashville, November 5, 1837: I have just returned from the Hermitage, where I spent all last week, and have had many and long conversations with the old chief in relation to the next campaign. He will be pleased to see you, if you can make it convenient to pass this way. Hon. Henry D. Gilpin, the Attorney-General, and a confidential friend of President Van Buren, had married the widow of Senator Johnston. He wrote to General Johnston, August 13th, kindly urging him to visit him at Washington. He says: It is very evident the annexation of Texas to our Union is to form a subject of importance and of contest too; I am sure your presence and information might often, very often, be of service. He adds: When we saw you at the head of the army, we began to think of Cortes and De Soto; and conjectured that you would have as many toils among swamps
nited States, actuated less by sympathy with Texas than by jealousy of Great Britain, offered such terms as Texas could accept; and the free republic exchanged her independence for sisterhood in the family of States from which her people had sprung. In the United States, annexation, which seemed impending in 1836, was not accomplished until after a series of severe political struggles. The President, Mr. Tyler, and the people of the South and West, favored it strongly; but Mr. Clay, Mr. Van Buren, and the more prominent leaders of both parties, were anxious to ignore it, as a question fraught with peril to its advocates and opponents alike. Under some sort of understanding, they all declared against it. In 1844 President Tyler forwarded the plan of annexation by treaty; but the Whigs, under the discipline of Mr. Clay, voting against it, it was defeated. The question, however, was stronger than the politicians, and at the Democratic Convention in 1844 a new man, Mr. Polk, was no
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 2: birth.-career as officer of Engineers, United States army. (search)
eror's authority. A war ensued, and the redoubtable Santa Anna was finally overthrown and captured at the battle of San Jacinto, April 21, 1836. Texas was later an applicant for membership to the union of American States. Her independence had been acknowledged by Great Britain, the United States, and other Powers; but Bustamente, who succeeded Santa Anna, repealed the treaty Mexico had with Texas and declared war. In the United States opinion was divided between annexation and war. President Van Buren, a citizen of New York, would not entertain annexation, while a successor-John Tyler, of Virginia-favored it. A treaty made to carry out the provisions of annexation was rejected by the Senate. In 1844 it became a party question, and by the election of James K. Polk, of Tennessee, who was in favor of it, over Henry Clay, of Kentucky, whose adherents were opposed to it, the people of the United States practically decided in favor of annexation. It was then natural and proper that the
citizens of Baltimore in this great crisis of our country. Prejudices and passions they are; and never have more unjust and unwarranted allegations been made than what a number of your citizens generally receive as truths. Chief among these is an assertion that President Lincoln, who for the time being is our Chief Magistrate, is a political abolitionist. I hold in my hand the Inaugural Address of President Lincoln, a portion of which I will read. It is he same position occupied by Mr. Van Buren in 1832, when he received the vote of Maryland for Vice-President. It is the position of Henry Clay (tremendous applause) in his whole career — a favorite of old Maryland; of Washington, Jefferson, and Madison, through a long period of the country's early history. Mr. Lincoln declares that he has no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery where it exists. The votes and resolutions in the convention that formed the Chicago Platform expressly declar
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
General Burnside's army, but still urged on the work. As soon as the bridge was mended, all the troops moved forward. General Howard had marched from Loudon, had found a pretty good ford for his horses and wagons at Davis's, seven miles below Morgantown, and had made an ingenious bridge of the wagons left by General Vaughn at Loudon, on which to pass his men. He marched by Unitia and Louisville. On the night of the 5th all the heads of columns communicated at Marysville, where I met Major Van Buren (of General Burnside's staff), who announced that Longstreet had the night before retreated on the Rutledge, Rogersville, and Bristol road, leading to Virginia; that General Burnside's cavalry was on his heels; and that the general desired to see me in person as soon as I could come to Knoxville. I ordered all the troops to halt and rest, except the two divisions of General Granger, which were ordered to move forward to Little River, and General Granger to report in person to General B
of General Burnside's army, but still urged on the work. As soon as the bridge was mended, all the troops moved forward. General Howard had marched from Loudon and had formed a pretty good ford for his wagons and horses at Davis, seven miles from Morgantown, and had made an ingenious bridge of the wagons left by Vaughn at Loudon, on which to pass his men. He marched by Unitia and Louisville. On the night of the fifth, all the heads of columns communicated at Marysville, where I met Major Van Buren, of General Burnside's staff, announcing that Longstreet had the night before retreated on the Rutledge, Rodgersville, and Bristol road, leading to Virginia; that General Burnside's cavalry was on his heels; that the General desired to see me in person as soon as I could come to Knoxville. I ordered all the troops to halt and rest, except the two divisions of General Granger, which were ordered to move forward to Little River, and General Granger to report in person to General Burnside
During his administration, Medford seemed to be the head of the Commonwealth. The coming into Medford of ship-carpenters who belonged to the Democratic party, and the gradual change of policy in the national administration, both helped to change the forces of town politics. As parties became more equally divided among us, the warmth of conflict increased; and, on some occasions, it was fearfully great. The two parties wore several names between the administrations of Mr. Monroe and Mr. Van Buren; but Medford became as fully and strongly Democratic as it had once been Federal. The first time a plurality was obtained by the Democratic party in Medford was April, 1828; and they lost it in 1854. The multiplication and mixture of new issues in politics have so broken society into divisions, and crumbled it into fragments, that old-fashioned patriots are confounded, and withdraw from the conflict altogether. A signboard, planted at the entrance of several roads, would not be a ve
of Major-General Dix, to ascertain what decision had been made in regard to having the forts on the coast garrisoned with one year's troops, whose terms of service were soon to expire. I had a pleasant interview with the General, and with Colonel Van Buren, his chief of staff, and was informed that authority had already been forwarded to your Excellency to recruit one year's companies as requested; and Colonel Van Buren caused a copy of the authority to be made out, which I forwarded that eveColonel Van Buren caused a copy of the authority to be made out, which I forwarded that evening to Major Brown, assistant Adjutant-General. On Thursday morning (Oct. 20), I met Brigadier-General Peirce, Inspector-General of the Commonwealth, who informed me that our Sixth Regiment had arrived in the city on its way home, its term of service being nearly completed, and that it was at the Battery Barracks. We visited the regiment soon afterwards, and found it in good condition; both officers and men were glad to see us. The regiment was to leave New York at three o'clock; and I ha
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
ney by way of New Orleans, he visited Columbia, South Carolina, where he was the guest of Governor Hamilton. The Governor, who had just transmitted to the legislature the edict of nullification, insisted that the author must repeat his visit to the state. Certainly, responded the guest, I will come with the first troops. In 1834, Irving declined a Democratic nomination for Congress, and in 1838 he put to one side the Tammany nomination for mayor of New York and also an offer from President Van Buren to make him Secretary of the Navy. In 1842, he accepted from President Tyler the appointment of Minister to Spain. The suggestion had come to the President from Daniel Webster, at that time Secretary of State. The succeeding five years were in large part devoted to the collection of material relating to the history and the legends of Spain during the Moorish occupation. On his return to New York in 1846, he met with a serious disappointment. His books were out of print, at lea
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
sorship never surpassed in the most despotic country on earth, and, if never possible of enforcement at the North, never relaxed at the South till slavery went under in blood and fire. Not even the jealousy of party spirit warned against such Democratic autocracy. Suppose the friends of Judge White [Hugh Lawson White, of Tennessee, a Presidential candidate of the time], at the South, should appoint committees to plunder the mail of all letters and newspapers which espoused the cause of Mr. Van Buren; how long would the partizans of the latter gentleman submit to the robbery? (W. L. G. in Lib. 5: 139). Both Judge White and John C. Calhoun suspected that their private correspondence was tampered with by their political opponents in the post-office (Lib. 6.64); and as early as 1830, Henry Clay, to guard against the treachery of the post-office, advised Webster to address him under cover, and proposed to do the same in return (Webster's Private Correspondence, 1.505). Neither the futur
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