Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 27, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Burnside or search for Burnside in all documents.

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Killed. --Major Gist, of the 15th regiment South Carolina volunteers, was killed in a fight with Burnside's troops, near Knoxville, on the 18th inst. He was the son of ex-Governor W. H. Gist. A shrewd old gentleman once said to his daughter, "Be sure, my dear, you never marry a poor man; but remember the poorest man in the world is one that has money and nothing else."
The reported surrender of Burnside. The reports from East Tennessee are very cheering, "if true," They state that Gen. Longstreet attacked Burnside in his outer line of defences at Knoxville, on Sunday, and drove him to his inner works at the point of the bayonet, killing and wounding large numbers of his men, and on Monday mBurnside in his outer line of defences at Knoxville, on Sunday, and drove him to his inner works at the point of the bayonet, killing and wounding large numbers of his men, and on Monday morning the attack was about to be renewed, when Burnside, finding himself surrounded on all sides, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally agreed upon, and the "hero of Fredericksburg," and five thousand of his men, laid down their arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War Department, we are coBurnside, finding himself surrounded on all sides, proposed negotiations for a surrender; that the former were finally agreed upon, and the "hero of Fredericksburg," and five thousand of his men, laid down their arms. As nothing of this kind has reached the War Department, we are compelled to put little faith in the pretty picture that is drawn by reliable gentlemen. The Lynchburg Republican, of yesterday, publishes a letter from a soldier in Longstreet's corps, written on Thursday last, giving a short account of the fight at Campbell's Station on the previous day. The enemy, he states, were badly beaten
The Daily Dispatch: November 27, 1863., [Electronic resource], The position of affairs before the battle of Lookout Mountain. (search)
problem while the two armies confront each other intact. A correspondent of the Atlanta Confederacy, writing on the 20th, says: I notice in the few papers that now and then reach this elevated region that some despondency is felt by those at a distance concerning the situation of the campaign which extends itself along this great river. Will you believe me sincere when I say that I never felt more hopeful? I believe we shall winter around Nashville. If Gen. Longstreet gobbles Burnside, as I think he will, Grant must retreat from Chattanooga. And as sure as we get him moved we will keep him moving. The prospect is very cheerful. A large army, an animated spirit, a programme well arranged, nothing but extraordinary bad luck will foil our plans. It is true that we need Forrest. It is true that we shall miss Polk. It is true that Gen. Lee would inspire a deeper confidence. But it is equally true that things are not so bad as they seem, and that General Hardee's presen