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e, 56. Brown, Joseph E., 240. Brown, P. P., 231, 290, 308. Brown, William H., 304. Brown, William Wells, 12. Browne, Albert G., 16,132. Browne, Albert G., Jr., 16, 132. Brunswick, Ga., 40. Brush, George W., 48. Buckle's Bluff, Fla., 184. Buffalo Creek, Ga., 40. Buffum, Charles, 16. Buist, Henry A., 227. Bull's Bay, S. C., 141, 225, 275, 284. Burgess, Thomas, 92. Burial of Shaw, 98, 226. Burning of Darien, Ga., 42. Burns, Anthony, 32. Burnt district, 139, 284. Burr, Aaron, 290. Burr, Theodosia, 290. Butler, Albert, 140. Butler, Benjamin F., 1, 16. Butler, Lewis, 87. Butler, Pierce, 45. C. C Company, 10, 20, 38, 39, 40, 75, 90, 92, 129, 145, 148, 150, 155, 164, 168,173, 183, 186, 198, 207, 234, 237, 245, 247, 263, 285, 286, 291, 300, 309, 310, 311, 312, 316, 317, 318, 320, 321. Cabot, John H., 16. Cabot, Mary E., 16. Cabot, S., Jr., 15. Calcium lights, 117, 138. Callahan, Fla., 155. Called, Daniel, 12. Camden, S. C., 297, 300. Camde
h wrongs brings into existence new and unknown classes of offences, or new causes for depriving men of their liberty. It is one of the most material purposes of that writ to enlarge upon bail persons who, upon probable cause, are duly and illegally charged with some known crime, and a suspension of the writ was never asked for in England or in this country, except to prevent such enlargement when the supposed offence was against the safety of the government. In the year 1807, at the time of Burr's alleged conspiracy, a bill was passed in the Senate of the United States, suspending the writ of habeas corpus for a limited time in all cases where persons were charged on oath with treason, or other high crime or misdemeanor, endangering the peace or safety of the government. But your doctrine undisguisedly is, that a suspension of this writ justifies arrests without warrant, without oath, and even without suspicion of treason or other crime. Your doctrine denies the freedom of speech a
d from Shreveport to Alexandria, forty miles from the former place, is Mansfield, a little village of about five hundred inhabitants. Twenty miles from Mansfield, on the same road, is the village of Pleasant Hill. Twenty miles further on is Blair's Landing on Red River. Still further on, forty miles above Alexandria, on Old River, which in high water communicates with Red River, we come to Natchitoches, the oldest town on Red River, the scene of the last conference between the agents of Aaron Burr and Gen. Hamilton in reference to the expedition of the former to conquer the Spanish and unfriendly powers in Louisiana and Mexico. Gen. Smith had determined to make a stand at a point between Mansfield and Shreveport, where he calculated on having his army concentrated, expecting by the superiour valour of his men to defeat the enemy's large force, but if not, to fall back on Shreveport, and fight from fortifications. On the morning of April 8th, Gen. Taylor, with his command now aug
heroism of the undaunted men and women whom it environed. A plain statement of facts is a picture of direst truth, which faithful History will preserve in its darkest gallery. In the foreground all will recognize a familiar character, in himself connecting link between President and border ruffian,—less conspicuous for ability than for the exalted place he has occupied,—who once sat in the seat where you now sit, Sir,—where once sat John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, —also, where once sat Aaron Burr. I need not add the name of David R. Atchison. You do not forget, that, at the session of Congress immediately succeeding the Nebraska Bill, he came tardily to his duty here, and then, after a short time, disappeared. The secret was long since disclosed. Like Catiline, he stalked into this Chamber, reeking with conspiracy,— immo etiam in Senatum venit,—and then, like Catiline, he skulked away,—abiit, excessit, evasit, erupit,—to join and provoke the conspirators, who at a dis
heroism of the undaunted men and women whom it environed. A plain statement of facts is a picture of direst truth, which faithful History will preserve in its darkest gallery. In the foreground all will recognize a familiar character, in himself connecting link between President and border ruffian,—less conspicuous for ability than for the exalted place he has occupied,—who once sat in the seat where you now sit, Sir,—where once sat John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, —also, where once sat Aaron Burr. I need not add the name of David R. Atchison. You do not forget, that, at the session of Congress immediately succeeding the Nebraska Bill, he came tardily to his duty here, and then, after a short time, disappeared. The secret was long since disclosed. Like Catiline, he stalked into this Chamber, reeking with conspiracy,— immo etiam in Senatum venit,—and then, like Catiline, he skulked away,—abiit, excessit, evasit, erupit,—to join and provoke the conspirators, who at a dis
. Plainfield, Conn., Feb. 8, 1820; d. Sunnyside, Pa., Mar. 7, 1855], at N. Y. anniversary, 2.348, at Groton Convention, 421. Burleigh, Rinaldo [1774-1863], 1.476. Burnet, J., Rev., at World's Convention, 2.370, 372. Burns, Anthony, 2.20. Burr, Aaron [1756-1836], A. S. vote in N. Y., 1.275; interview with G., 276. Bushnell, Horace, Rev. [2802-1876], 2.132. Butler, Benjamin Franklin [b. 1818], 1.258. Buxton, Thomas Fowell [1786-1845], English abolitionist, 1.146; M. P., successor onment for debt, 269, tobacco, 1.269, Cherokee outrage, 270, Masonry, 271; tributes to Lundy and Knapp, 272, S. J. May, 273; secures Henry Benson as agent and meets G. W. Benson, 274; first steps towards A. S. organization, 275; interview with Aaron Burr, 276(1831)——Founds New Eng. A. S. Society, 1.277-280, made corr. secretary, 281, direction of Society, 282; delegate to Phila. Conv. People of Color, 283; 4th of July address, 285, address to African Abol. Freehold Soc., 285; lecturing agen
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Edwards (search)
cessfully. It must have been one of the memorable sights of the world to see him returning on horseback from a solitary ride into the forest, while there fluttered about him, pinned to his coat, the strips of paper on which he had scribbled the results of his meditations. His days were little troubled, and not overburdened with work, peaceful it is thought; and now it was he wrote the treatise on the Freedom of the will upon which his fame chiefly depends. In 1757 his son-in-law, the Rev. Aaron Burr, died, and Edwards was chosen by the Trustees of the College of New Jersey to succeed him as president. Edwards hesitated, stating frankly to the Trustees his disabilities of health and learning, but he finally accepted the offer. He left his family to follow him later, and arrived in Princeton in January, 1758. Smallpox was in the town, and the new president was soon infected. His death took place on 22 March, in the fifty-fifth year of his age. His last recorded words were: Trus
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
ascination, and his practice did not become important. He had the opportunity of being associated as a junior with the counsel who had charge of the defence of Aaron Burr in the famous trial held in Richmond in June, 1807. The writer remembers the twinkle in the old gentleman's eye when he said in reply to some question about his legal experiences, I was one of the counsel for Burr, and Burr was acquitted. In letters written from Richmond at the time, he was frank enough, however, to admit that he had not been called upon for any important service. During Irving's brief professional association with Hoffman, he was accepted as an intimate in the HoffmaBurr was acquitted. In letters written from Richmond at the time, he was frank enough, however, to admit that he had not been called upon for any important service. During Irving's brief professional association with Hoffman, he was accepted as an intimate in the Hoffman family circle, and it was Hoffman's daughter Matilda who was the heroine in the only romance of the author's life. He became engaged to Matilda when he was barely of age, but the betrothal lasted only a few months, as she died suddenly at the age of seventeen. At the time of Irving's death it was found that he was still wearin
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
er, 226 Bunker Hill, 226 Bunyan, John, 109 Burgoyne, 100, 144 Burk, 192 Burk, John, 224, 226 Burke, Charles, 231 Burke, Edmund, 91, 99, 141, 200, 212, 277 Burnaby, Rev., Andrew, 205, 206 Burnett, J. G., 226 Burns, 283 Burr, Aaron, 247 Burr, Rev., Aaron, 65 Burroughs, Edward, 8 Burroughs, John, 271 Burton, R., II, 93 Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173, 274 Byles, Mather, 113, 114, 159-160 ByrBurr, Rev., Aaron, 65 Burroughs, Edward, 8 Burroughs, John, 271 Burton, R., II, 93 Burton, W. E., 231 Busy-body, the, 117 Busy-body papers, 95, 115 Butler, Samuel, 112, 173, 274 Byles, Mather, 113, 114, 159-160 Byrd, William, 10, 13 Byron, 212, 243, 261, 262, 264, 265, 268, 271, 276, 278, 279, 280, 282, 309 Byron and Byronism in America, 280 n. C Caius Marius, 222 Calavar, 319 Calaynos, 222, 223 n. Caleb Williams, 288, 290 Calef, Robert, 55 Calvert, Sir, George, 4 Calvin, 36, 39, 66, 67, 71, 83 Campaign, 159 Campbell, George, 229 Campbell, Thomas, 183, 282 Candid examination of the neutral claims of great Britain and the colonies, a, 138 Captain Barney's victory ove
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
the usual method, Mr. Chairman, of proving one's right to a statue? The Publican repented, and was forgiven; but is a statue, ten feet high, cast in bronze, a usual element of forgiveness? And, mark, the Publican repented. When did Mr. Webster repent, either in person or by the proxy of Mr. Edward Everett? We have no such record. The sm is confessed, acknowledged, as a mistake at least; but there's no repentance! Let us look a little into this doctrine of statues for sinners. Take Aaron Burr. Tell of his daring in Canada, his watch on the Hudson, of submissive juries, of his touching farewell to the Senate. But then there was that indiscretion as to Hamilton. Well, Mr. Immaculate, remember the Publican. Or suppose we take Benedict Arnold,--brave in Connecticut, gallant at Quebec, recklessly daring before Burgoyne! But that little peccadillo at West point Think of the Publican, Mr. Immaculate. Why, on this principle, one might claim a statue for Milton's Satan. He was br
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