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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
izing Mexico. Pressed by his creditors, he lived a miserable life, in poverty, in London and Paris. Becoming subject to suspicion in London as a French spy, he was driven from the country, and took refuge in Paris. Finally, after long solicitations, he obtained leave to return, and appeared in New York in 1812, where he resumed the practice of law; but he lived in comparative poverty and obscurity until 1834, when, at the age of seventy-eight, he married Madame Jumel, a wealthy woman in New York, with whom he lived only a short time, when they were separated. Burr's first wife was the The Burrows medal. widow of Gen. Augustine Prevost, by whom he had a daughter, Theodosia. She became an accomplished woman, and the wife of Governor Allston, of South Carolina. She left Charleston (1812) in a vessel to visit her father in New York, and was never heard of afterwards. Burr was small in stature, of great ability, and fascinating in manners. He died on Staten Island, Sept. 14, 1836.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burrows, William, 1785- (search)
Burrows, William, 1785- Naval officer; born in Kensington (now a part of Philadelphia), Oct. 6, 1785; entered the navy, as midshipman, November, 1799; and served under Preble in the war against Tripoli. In March, 1807, he was promoted to lieutenant, and, early in the War of 1812-15, he was placed in command of the sloop-of-war Enterprise. On Sunday, Sept. 5, 1813, he fought the British brig Boxer, with the Enterprise, off Portland, Me. the Boxer was vanquished, but Burrows was slain. Fo of Philadelphia), Oct. 6, 1785; entered the navy, as midshipman, November, 1799; and served under Preble in the war against Tripoli. In March, 1807, he was promoted to lieutenant, and, early in the War of 1812-15, he was placed in command of the sloop-of-war Enterprise. On Sunday, Sept. 5, 1813, he fought the British brig Boxer, with the Enterprise, off Portland, Me. the Boxer was vanquished, but Burrows was slain. For this exploit, Congress voted a gold medal to his nearest male relation.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Enterprise, the. (search)
until he was promoted to the command of the new sloop-of-war Wasp, when Lieut. William Burrows became her commander. On the morning of Sept. 1, 1813, she sailed fromnt, which, observing the Enterprise, bore down upon her in menacing attitude. Burrows accepted the challenge, cleared Graves of Burrows, Blyth, and waters. his Burrows, Blyth, and waters. his ship for action, and, after getting a proper distance from land to have ample sea-room for conflict, he edged towards the stranger, which proved to be the British br18-pound cannon-ball. Almost at the same moment when Blyth fell on the Boxer, Burrows, of the Enterprise, was mortally wounded. So also was Midshipman Kervin Waters. Blyth was killed instantly; Burrows lived eight hours. The latter refused to be carried below until the sword of the commander of the Boxer was delivered to him cemetery at Portland. Congress presented a gold medal to the nearest masculine representative of Lieutenant Burrows; and another was presented to Lieutenant McCall.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCall, Edward R. 1790-1853 (search)
McCall, Edward R. 1790-1853 Naval officer; born in Charleston, S. C., Aug. 5, 1790; entered the navy as midshipman in 1808, and in the summer of 1813 was lieutenant of the brig Enterprise. In the action with the Boxer, Sept. 4, 1813, his commander (Lieutenant Burrows) was mortally wounded, when the command devolved upon McCall, who succeeded in capturing the British vessel. For this service Congress voted him a gold medal. He was made master-commander in 1825, and captain in 1835. He died in Bordentown, N. J., July 31. 1853.