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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1863., [Electronic resource], The Act which brought Butler's career to its end. (search)
The Act which brought Butler's career to its end. The idea has more or less prevailed that Butler was removed from his command for being too free in the theft and personal appropriation of the property of the Confederate citizens of that place aButler was removed from his command for being too free in the theft and personal appropriation of the property of the Confederate citizens of that place and Louisiana. There never was a greater mistake. If the thief had given a fair share, even, of his booty to his own Government, he could have remained in the Crescent City until the Confederate army ejected him therefrom, but his Massachusetts pockages, (in all probability half a million of dollars,) for breaking up the business of a prosperous house; and, above all, Butler the luramous, will be called upon to fork over the cash, will be called upon to fork over the cash, which it is said he took unto himself. The writer was in New Orleans during the whole reign of Butler, and was a spectator of many of his acts of tyranny and infamy. He solemnly believes that this, the meanest, worst of mankind, is fully sensible of his own infamy a
Milrey's reign in Winchester. The reign of Milroy in Winchester, Va., which has rivalled in brutality and robbery that of Butler in New Orleans, is now over. A letter from a lady who was sent by him within our lines, gives some idea of the little ness and cruelty of the Yankee General in Winchester, and we make some extracts from it: Gen. Milroy and his Yankee tribe still have possession, and, as you know, have had for six months. I did not leave with by husband when our army left, for it was winter, and my health not good, and I did not moving around from place to place as I should have had to do if I left home, particularly winter. But as soon as pleasant came I wanted to leave, but could not imagine how to get "over the lines" Every day our enemies were becoming harder and harder for us.--There is only one prayer in Winchester, and that is, "Oh, God, how long, how long I" breathed from hearts filled with suffering and misery. God only knows what the people of Winche
irection of Stephensburg, moving the main body, however, directly upon Brandy Station. This movement was foreseen by Gen. Stuart and provided against, by sending Butler's and Wickham's regiments to Stephensburg — the movement being thus in no sense a surprise, as some of the newspaper accounts state. A larger force could not prud Hampton's brigades were moved to the support of Gen. W. H. F. Lee's brigade during this contest on the left, but did not become engaged. At Stephensburg Cols. Butler and Wickham also had hard fighting, in which both regiments were very hard pressed; but by night the entire force of the enemy had been driven across the riverff. Among the officers whose death we have to mourn, are Col. Sol. Williams, 2nd N. C. cavalry; Lieut. Col. Frank Hampton, 2nd S. C., and Capt. Jones, 1st S. C. Col. Butler, 2nd S. C., was so severely wounded as to require the amputation of his foot; and Brig-Gen. W. H. F. Lee received a flesh wound in the leg, at the close of his