hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 309 19 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 309 19 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 170 20 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 117 33 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 65 11 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 62 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 2 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 34 12 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 29 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Butler or search for Butler in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

itary topics are brought under discussion, which is, indeed, every hour of the day. Nobody believes that the enemy will ever enter Richmond as long as Lee and Beauregard, with such armies as they command, are interposed between them and Grant and Butler, for they know that these armies must first be annihilated, and they do not think Grant and Butler the men to do that job. More excitement was created by the raid of Kilpatrick, three months ago, than has been created by the approach of Grant's hButler the men to do that job. More excitement was created by the raid of Kilpatrick, three months ago, than has been created by the approach of Grant's huge army, beaten and depleted as it has already been, and bearing in its train nothing of the prestige of victory. That our Generals are worthy, of all the confidence which is thus gratuitously bestowed upon them, none know better than the Yankees. Gen Beauregard has been so successful wherever he has commanded that he has been styled the "fortunate General;" yet his good fortune has been due not to blind chance, or luck as it is generally termed, but to his own genius and his thorough mas
us demonstrations on our left, and having attracted our attention to that quarter, he availed himself of the night and moved rapidly past our right, advancing each time somewhat nearer to Richmond. His great desire now is to form a junction with Butler, either by bringing Butler to him, or, what is more probable, by going himself to Butier. He has established his base at West Point, at the confluence of the Pamunkey and Mattapony, whence his supplies are sent by boats of light draft to White HButler to him, or, what is more probable, by going himself to Butier. He has established his base at West Point, at the confluence of the Pamunkey and Mattapony, whence his supplies are sent by boats of light draft to White House, and thence by wagons to his army. Let us hope that when he attempts to cross the narrow peninsula between the Pamunkey and the Chickahominy he will find it as fatal as the Red Sea was to Pharoah and his hosts. It is not believed that Grant will move out from his present position to attack Gen Lee. If there is a battle in the next few days the Confederates must take the initiative, or it is not probable that there will be one. Sallust.