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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 3, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 29, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
William W. Bennett, A narrative of the great revival which prevailed in the Southern armies during the late Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 62 (search)
nstructions that we should fortify and hold the knob at all hazards, I immediately set to work with three companies on the left, viz, H, Lieutenant Dorneck; C, Captain Byrd, and I, Capt. George W. Cummins, together with the pioneers of the brigade, who had been ordered to report to me for that purpose, to fortify the knob. This wt of a line of works which was occupied by the enemy. Early on the morning of the 2.2d it was discovered that the enemy had again evacuated, and Company C, Captain Byrd, on the skirmish line, picked up a few stragglers. During the forenoon we moved forward toward Atlanta, and about noon went into position near the city, on tered to advance our skirmish line, and, if possible, take the enemy's rifle-pits in our front. The line was strengthened so that it was composed of Company C, Captain Byrd; Company H, Lieutenant Dorneck; Company E, Lieutenant Du Bois; Company K, Captain Carroll, and Company G, Lieutenant Doolittle. At the signal the whole line d
aptain: Late in the afternoon of the 20th instant I was informed by a messenger from Claiborne County, East Tennessee that four rebel regiments, with six pieces of artillery, under command of General Smith (who had arrived on the preceding day), left Cumberland Gap on the 19th instant to attack the Second East Tennessee Regiment, which was then stationed at Woodson's Gap, some 3 miles from Fincastle, Campbell County, East Tennessee. Orders were given to the First East Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Byrd-Seventh Kentucky, Colonel Garrard-Sixteenth Ohio, Colonel De Courcy; Forty-ninth Indiana, Colonel Say, and to Lieutenant-Colonel Munday, First Battalion of Kentucky Cavalry, to prepare four days rations and be ready to move on the following morning. Captain Wetmore's Ninth Ohio Battery was also ordered to have one section (two Parrott guns) in readiness to accompany the command. The whole force amounted to some 2,300 men. Proper guards were left at this place and in the several camps.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 170. retreat of the wild Cat Brigade. (search)
prepare to move was issued to the troops, it was received with exultation. The Tennesseeans were especially delighted, and prepared with alacrity to return to their fire-sides. It had been currently reported that letters had been received by prominent Tennesseeans, from friends at Louisville and Washington, assuring them that the Cumberland Gap expedition would soon be pushed to an issue. This order, therefore, confirmed the report; and I am told that Hon. Andy Johnson, General Carter, Colonel Byrd, Colonel Spears, and others, were elated at the prospect of an immediate fruition of their hopes. They did not seem to comprehend that the order concerning the sick implied a retrograde movement. But when informed of the fact, they were overwhelmed with sorrow and indignation. Mr. Johnson turned from his informant, and entered his hotel without one word, in utter despair. The information was withheld from the troops until they were moving, when the fact flashed upon them, and they d
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
Indiana, Colonel Willach. Fourth Brigade (General Negley).--Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania, Colonel Hambright; Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania, Colonel Sinnell; Seventy-ninth Pennsylvania, Colonel Stambaugh; Battery----, Captain Mueller. Camp Dick Robinson (General G. H. Thomas).------Kentucky, Colonel Bramlette;----Kentucky, Colonel Fry;----Kentucky Cavalry, Colonel Woolford; Fourteenth Ohio, Colonel Steadman; First Artillery, Colonel Barnett; Third Ohio, Colonel Carter;----East Tennessee, Colonel Byrd. Bardstown, Kentucky.--Tenth Indiana, Colonel Manson. Crab Orchard.--Thirty-third Indiana, Colonel Coburn. Jeffersonville, Indiana.--Thirty-fourth Indiana, Colonel Steele; Thirty-sixth Indiana, Colonel Grose; First Wisconsin, Colonel Starkweather. Mouth of Salt River.--Ninth Michigan, Colonel Duffield; Thirty-seventh Indiana, Colonel Hazzard. Lebanon Junction.--Second Minnesota, Colonel Van Cleve. Olympian Springs.--Second Ohio, Colonel Harris. Cynthiana, Kentucky.--Thirty-fifth
ier probably died for want of attention. Yesterday he was found dead in the house, his blankets and clothing having been stripped off and carried away by some greedy rebel in Longstreet's army. Five miles from town, near the house of a Mr. Bell, one of our men was found hanging by the neck suspended to the limb of a tree, with a paper pinioned upon his breast. The paper contained in pencil the following: Milon Ferguson, One Hundred and Eighteenth Ohio regiment, sent into our lines by Colonel Byrd in disguise. Hung as a spy, by order of--------. General Carter sent and had the soldier brought to town and decently interred. The neighbors, who were accused of the hanging, say it was done by rebel General Martin's escort. The following is General Burnside's congratulatory order to the army: headquarters army of the Ohio, in the field, December 5, 1863. General field orders, No. 34. The Commanding General congratulates the troops on the raising of the siege. With u
ortunately for us, were of a character to occupy a considerable share of the enemy's attention, and oblige him to keep a large force of his cavalry busy beyond the immediate lines of the siege. The first important movement of the enemy, after they laid siege to Knoxville, was to send a large body of cavalry to Kingston, to operate in that quarter. This was on the twenty-fourth of November. On the twenty-sixth, as near as I am able to ascertain, the cavalry under General Wheeler found Colonel Byrd's brigade strongly intrenched near Kingston, and after a fruitless effort to dislodge or capture him, and losing a considerable number of men, he withdrew. Wheeler hereupon turned over his command to another officer, and returned toward Chattanooga, ostensibly to take an infantry command. He narrowly escaped capture at Cleveland, where three railroad trains fell into our hands. The rebel cavalry returned into Knoxville, arriving on Saturday previous to the famous Sunday assault at Fort
the objective of the campaign. Sherman perceived at once the futility of trying to carry by assault this strongly garrisoned position. Instead, he made a feint at crossing the river lower down, and simultaneously went to work in earnest eight miles north of the bridge. The lower picture shows the canvas pontoon boats as perfected by Union engineers in 1864. A number of these were stealthily set up and launched by Sherman's Twenty-third Corps near the mouth of Soap Creek, behind a ridge. Byrd's brigade took the defenders of the southern bank completely by surprise. It was short work for the Federals to throw pontoon bridges across and to occupy the coveted spot in force. The Chattahoochee bridge Infantry and artillery crossing on boats made of pontoons Harker, leading a charge against Cleburne, was mortally wounded. His men were swept back by a galling fire, though many fell with their brave leader. This assault on Kenesaw Mountain cost Sherman three thousand men a
the objective of the campaign. Sherman perceived at once the futility of trying to carry by assault this strongly garrisoned position. Instead, he made a feint at crossing the river lower down, and simultaneously went to work in earnest eight miles north of the bridge. The lower picture shows the canvas pontoon boats as perfected by Union engineers in 1864. A number of these were stealthily set up and launched by Sherman's Twenty-third Corps near the mouth of Soap Creek, behind a ridge. Byrd's brigade took the defenders of the southern bank completely by surprise. It was short work for the Federals to throw pontoon bridges across and to occupy the coveted spot in force. The Chattahoochee bridge Infantry and artillery crossing on boats made of pontoons Harker, leading a charge against Cleburne, was mortally wounded. His men were swept back by a galling fire, though many fell with their brave leader. This assault on Kenesaw Mountain cost Sherman three thousand men a
r conviction, and asked by him if he had given himself to Christ: Yes, said the stalwart warrior with a glowing countenance, I have found him. Why, sir, when we set off on that march I felt such a weight upon my soul that I could scarcely drag myself along, but after a while God heard my prayers, and then the burden was gone and I felt as if marching was no trouble at all. Good men that work for God faithfully die well even in war, on the field or in the hospital. Captain Thos. 0. Byrd, of the Fourth Mississippi regiment, was a zealous Christian among his comrades. He says, writing to his friends at home: I have prayers in my tent every night with the boys, and assist others to take up the Cross. I have just had prayers with some wild young men, who are now engaged in singing with much zest and feeling. Oh, what a field is open here! Fare is rough, but gladly would I live thus for life for Christ's sake and the good of man. I have gained a great victory to-day. I
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 11 (search)
the movements of a grand army. The whole face of the country is thickly wooded, with only an occasional opening, and intersected by a few narrow wood-roads. But the woods of the Wilderness have not the ordinary features of a forest. The region rests on a belt of mineral rocks, and, for above a hundred years, extensive mining has here been carried on. The mines of this region were first worked in the early part of the last century by Alexander Spottswood, then governor of Virginia. Colonel Byrd, in his Progress of the Mines, published in 1732, gives many interesting details of this region, from which it appears that Germanna, now known only as a ford, was once a place of some celebrity. This famous town [Germanna] consists of Colonel Spottswood's enchanted castle on one side of the street and a baker's dozen of ruinous tenements on the other, where so many German families had dwelt some years ago; but are now removed ten miles higher, in the fork of the Rappahannock, to land of
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