Browsing named entities in James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown. You can also browse the collection for John Campbell or search for John Campbell in all documents.

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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Exodus. (search)
elation to his invasion of Missouri, which, of course, should precede all other accounts of it. It became a celebrated document, and was known as: John Brown's parallels. Trading Post, Kansas, January, 1859. Gentlemen: You will greatly oblige a humble friend by allowing the use of your columns while I briefly state two parallels, in my poor way. Not one year ago, eleven quiet citizens of this neighborhood, viz.: William Robertson, William Colpetzer, Amos Hall, Austin Hall, John Campbell, Asa Snyder, Thomas Stilwell, William Hairgrove, Asa Hairgrove, Patrick Ross, and B. L. Reed, were gathered up from their work and their homes by an armed force under one Hamilton, and without trial or opportunity to speak in their own defence, were formed into line, and all but one shot--five killed and five wounded. One fell unharmed, pretending to be dead. All were left for dead. The only crime charged against them was that of being Free State men. Now, I inquire, what action has ev
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: State evidence closed. (search)
heriff, who knew the handwriting of the prisoner, be brought to identify his handwriting. John Brown. I will identify any of my handwriting, and save all that trouble. I am ready to face the music. Mr. Hunter. I prefer to prove them by Mr. Campbell. John Brown. Either way you please. The bundle of letters was then opened; each was identified by Campbell, and then handed to the prisoner, who, in a firm tone, replied, Yes-- that is mine, as soon as he recognized his writing. Mr. Campbell, and then handed to the prisoner, who, in a firm tone, replied, Yes-- that is mine, as soon as he recognized his writing. Mr. hunter presented the form of Government established by the insurgents, and read a list of the members of the Convention. It is headed, William Charles Morris, President of the Convention, and II. Kagi, Secretary of the Convention. On handing the list to Brown, he exclaimed, with a groan, That is my signature. 3r. Ball, master machinist of the Armory, one of the prisoners made by Captain Brown, testified as to his arrest, and stated that he was conducted to Captain Brown, who told me his ob