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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
f death . . . . Here, again,—Lake George, In the years from 1851 to 1855, inclusive, Mr. Ticknor and his family passed a part of each summer on the shores of this lovely lake.—is another contrast to the rushing glories of Niagara, for the beautiful, quiet lake is always before us, and nearly every one of our pleasures is connected with it. Agreeable people, however, we have in the house, several fixtures, the same we had last year,—Dr. Beck, the author of the book on legal medicine; Dr. Campbell, the popular preacher in Albany; and two or three others, . . . . with whom we have agreeable, easy intercourse. The ruins of the old Forts, from the time of Dieskau and Montcalm, with the graves of the soldiers who perished in them and around them, are full of teachings; while at the other end of the lake is Ticonderoga, with its old ruins and traditions . . . . This week, we start for the North River, the younger portion of the party having never seen Catskill, and all of us being <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
The Lawley family, into which she married, however, is recent and rich, the Hall and its gardens showing their resources, and a new church and rectory, near, showing their good taste and judgment. The other was a place belonging to a Mr. Preston, who married a grand-daughter of that Pamela who figures so much in Mad. de Genlis' Memoirs, and who was, no doubt, a daughter of Mad. de Genlis and Philippe Egalite. She is a very bright, brilliant little Irish woman, and so is her mother, Lady Campbell, who is staying with her; both being worthy of their descent from Mad. de Genlis and Lord Edward Fitzgerald. Mrs. Harcourt seems to like them both, and I was glad to see them, as she much desired I should. Their park and garden, too, are fine. The drive and visits occupied till dinner-time,—indeed, till after t Pamela having married Lord Edward Fitzgerald. the usual hour, which is seven, so that the evening was rather short. . . . The Harcourts have, many times since I have been
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
dge, Duchess of, II. 381. Cambridge, Duke of, II. 381. Cambridge, England, visits, I. 270, 271, II. 155-159. Cambridge, Princess Mary of, Il 381 Cammuccini, Cav., II. 76. Camoens, I. 244, 252. Campagna of Rome, I. 168. Campbell, Rev., John, II. 281. Campbell, Sir, John, I 246, 246. Campbell, Thomas, I. 62, 63, 65, 282, 410, II. 360. Camperdown, Third Earl of, 11.482. Camporesi, prima donna, II. 76. Campuzano, M., II. 126. Canning, anecdote of, II. 150. CCampbell, Sir, John, I 246, 246. Campbell, Thomas, I. 62, 63, 65, 282, 410, II. 360. Camperdown, Third Earl of, 11.482. Camporesi, prima donna, II. 76. Campuzano, M., II. 126. Canning, anecdote of, II. 150. Canova, Antonio, I. 172. Capponi, Marchese Gaetano, II. 52, 53. Capponi, Marchese Gino, II. 56, 77, 315, 339. Capuccini, Monsignor, II. 85. Cardwell, Edward (Lord), II. 323, 384, 397, 398, 399. Cardwell, Mrs. E., II. 384, 397. Cardwell, Mrs., II. 397. Carlisle, Seventh Earl of, II 271, 425; letter to, 450; letter from, 451. See Morpeth. Carlyle, Dr., II. 59. Carlyle, Thomas, II. 180. Carmignani, II. 92, 93, 94. Carroll, Archbishop, I. 41. Carroll, Charles, I. 41.