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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
lished and placed under the command of Colonel E. R. S. Canby, 19th U. S. Infantry, who had previoussisted in producing the disorder that ensued. Canby retreated to the adobe walls of Fort Craig, haeverything was moving in their favor, but when Canby assumed command the tide of battle turned, untn of the officers engaged at Valverde, that if Canby had remained at Fort Craig on that day the Conward Fort Union; or of forming a junction with Canby's force, which was supposed to have left Fort to receive them, and fired a few rounds, when Canby retired and passed through Carnuel CaƱon to thpost. When news was received at Santa Fe that Canby had attacked Albuquerque, Colonel Scurry with termined upon retreating from the territory if Canby would allow him to do so. On the morning of Aphe morning of the 17th reveille was sounded in Canby's camp, but no move could be observed in the e a long time for them to commence their march, Canby sent some scouts across, who soon returned wit[7 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
, a famous old South Carolina bully, upon the beating given him by his own son. Hush up, said old Tom. I am glad that no one but my own flesh and blood had a hand in my drubbing. The sons of the South struck her many heavy blows. Farragut, of Tennessee, rose, as a reward of merit, to the highest rank in the Federal navy. A large number of his associates were from the South. In the Federal army there were of Southern blood and lineage Generals Thomas, Sykes, Reno, Newton, J. J Reynolds, Canby, Ord, Brannan, William Nelson, Crittenden, Blair, R. W. Johnson, T. J. Wood, N. B. Buford, Terrill, Graham, Davidson, Cooke, Alexander, Getty, French, Fremont, Pope, Hunter. Some of these doubtless served the South better by the side they took; most of them were fine, and some superb, officers. Moreover, the South had three hundred thousand of her sons in the Federal army in subordinate capacities. According to a printed statement dated at the Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, No
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Canby's services in the New Mexican campaign. (search)
Canby's services in the New Mexican campaign. by Latham Anderson, Brevet Brigadier-General, U. S. the hostile Indian country of Arizona to join Canby was made by eleven companies of infantry, two etailed account of that retreat. Soon after Canby assumed command of the department, and before ng out this plan at intervals of a few miles. Canby had no confidence in the capacity of the New M strong positions until he passed Albuquerque, Canby could then form a junction with the reinforcemis the w riter's authority for this outline of Canby's intended plan of campaign. This plan was ma move forward into line. For this, of course, Canby was not responsible. His plan of pivoting on r the reverse at Valverde nothing remained for Canby but to strive for a junction with the troops aexans that they were being attacked in rear by Canby's column. This caused a panic among part of t the enemy at Peralta, on the 15th of January, Canby had it in his power to capture the entire colu[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Canby at Valverde. (search)
Canby at Valverde. by A. W. Evans, Lieutenant-Colonel, U. S. A. Colonel Canby reached the field of Valverde in the afternoon, during the lull, proceeding to the position of MoRae's battery. One or two shots were fired from it after his arrival without eliciting a reply. After consultation and examination of the position, he ot and spherical case; there was no grape. That the Union troops were successful in the morning under Colonel Roberts and were defeated in the evening under Colonel Canby was the fortune of war. It is not always correct to argue post hoc, proper hoc. The result would probably have been the same if the commanders had been reverse the Union troops were successful in the morning under Colonel Roberts and were defeated in the evening under Colonel Canby was the fortune of war. It is not always correct to argue post hoc, proper hoc. The result would probably have been the same if the commanders had been reversed, or if Colonel Canby had remained at Fort Craig.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Sibley's New Mexican campaign.--its objects and the causes of its failure. (search)
dly sufficient to keep him in his position. That date (1862) was the darkest hour in the annals of our sister republic, but it was the brightest of the Confederacy, and General Sibley thought that he would have little difficulty in consummating the ends so devoutly wished by the Confederate Government. The direct cause of our discomfiture and the failure of our campaign was the want of supplies of all kinds for the use of our army. The territory which we occupied was no storehouse. Colonel Canby's order to destroy everything that would be of use to the Confederates had been fully enforced. Thus we were situated in the very heart of the enemy's country, with well-equipped forces in our front and rear. General Sibley was not a good administrative officer. He did not husband his resources, and was too prone to let the morrow take care of itself. But for this the expedition never would have been undertaken, nor would he have left the enemy between him and his base of supplies,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
rce under Polignac. He was beaten back with a heavy loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners, while the Nationals lost one hundred and fifty in killed and wounded. On the following day May 20, 1864. the army crossed the Atchafalaya, when General E. R. S. Canby, who had arrived the day before, assumed the, command of Banks's troops as a part of the forces of the Military Division of West Mississippi, to the charge of which he had been assigned. General Banks then hastened to New Orleans. Genhere with mischievous intent. He found them, three thousand strong, near Columbia, the capital of Chicot County, posted across a bayou that empties into Lake Chicot. He attacked and drove them away, with a loss of about one hundred men. Edward R. S. Canby. They retreated westward, and were no more seen in that region. Smith's loss was about ninety men. Admiral Porter, meanwhile, had passed quietly down the Red River, nearly parallel with the march of the army, and resumed the duty of k
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
mander J. R. M. Mullaney; Port Royal, Lieutenant-Commander B. Gherarde; Seminole, Commander E. Donaldson; Kennebeck, Lieutenant-Commander W. P. McCann; Itasca, Lieutenant-Commander George Brown, and Galena, Lieutenant-Commander C. H. Wells. The ironclad vessels were the Tecumseh, Commander T. A. M. Craven; Manhattan, Commander T. W. A. Nicholson; Winnebago, Commander T. H. Stevens, and Chickasaw, Lieutenant-Commander T. H. Perkins. while a land force, about five thousand strong, sent by General Canby from New Orleans, under General Gordon Granger, was planted upon Dauphin Island for the purpose of co-operating. the entrance to Mobile Bay is divided by Dauphin Island, making two passages; the easterly one four miles wide and Twenty-five feet deep in the channel. The other, known as Grant's Pass, was a very narrow passage, between two little islands, and not more than five or six feet deep at low water. On one of the little islands, and commanding the Pass, was a small earth-work,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
e quiet in that region. The grand movements in Georgia and in Middle Tennessee occupied the attention of all. At length, when Sherman had finished his triumphal march through Georgia, to the sea-board, and Thomas had decimated Hood's army in Middle Tennessee, Grant and the Government determined to take active measures for the repossession of Alabama, by a movement against Mobile, aided by other operations in the interior. The conduct of the expedition against Mobile was assigned to General E. R. S. Canby, then commanding the West Mississippi Army, with headquarters at New Orleans; and the co-operating movement was intrusted to General J. H. Wilson, the eminent cavalry leader, under the direction of General Thomas. Mobile, at the beginning of 1865, was thoroughly fortified by three continuous lines of earth-works around the entire city. The first was constructed by Captain C. T. Lieurner, in 1862, at an average distance of three miles out from the business streets, and comprised f
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 20: Peace conference at Hampton Roads.--the campaign against Richmond. (search)
that River, and forming the right of the besiegers, had its pickets within a few miles of Richmond. see page 862. Sheridan was in good quarters at Kerns-town, near Winchester, full master of the Shenandoah Valley, from Harper's Ferry to Staunton, and bearing the honors of a major-general in the regular Army. see page 372. Grant held the besieging forces in comparative quiet during the winter of 1864-65, their chief business being to keep Lee from moving, while Sherman, Thomas, and Canby were making their important conquests in accordance with the comprehensive plan of campaign of the General-in-chief. To this business those forces were specially directed, when the operations against Wilmington, and Sherman's approach to the coast and his March through the Carolinas, were going on, for it was well known that the Conspirators were contemplating a transfer of both the Confederate Government and Lee's Army to the cotton States, where that of Johnston and all the other forces m
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 21: closing events of the War.--assassination of the President. (search)
y 14,179. The capitulation included all the troops in Johnston's Military Department, which comprised the sea-board States south of Virginia. On the 4th of May, General Taylor surrendered, at Citronelle, the Confederate forces in Alabama, to General Canby, on terms substantially like those accorded to Lee and Johnston. At the same time and place, Commander Farrand, as we have observed, See note 3, page 514. surrendered, to Rear-Admiral Thatcher, the Confederate navy in the Tombigbee River.w Orleans sent dismay to the hearts of the Confederates in the Trans-Mississippi region, and the men in arms refused longer to follow their leaders in a hopeless struggle. Kirby Smith formally surrendered May 26, 1865. his entire command to General Canby, and thereby rendered an advance of Sheridan into Western Louisiana and Texas unnecessary. Before the surrender was actually effected, Kirby Smith exhibited the bad faith of first disbanding most of his army, and permitting an indiscriminate
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