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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
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to himself and to his State's advantage. On the 11th of May General Banks was relieved, at his own request, by Maj.-Gen. R. S. Canby. General Canby did no fighting in Louisiana For that, Mansfield and Pleasant Hill had amply provided. In JanuGeneral Canby did no fighting in Louisiana For that, Mansfield and Pleasant Hill had amply provided. In January, 1865, it appeared that the brigade of Gen. Allen Thomas, consisting of the Seventeenth, Twenty-sixth, Twentysev-enth, Twenty-eighth and Thirty-first Louisiana infantry, Weatherly's battalion (late Miles' legion), Wade's light artillery and acomians in a charge against the Federal line, made gallantly by them, and serving its purpose in preventing an assault. General Canby's two army corps sat down to a regular siege on March 27th. Gibson's works were soon almost surrounded by batteries,son in the valley of Virginia, or teaching Banks the art of war in West Louisiana. On May 8, 1865, he surrendered to General Canby at Citronelle, 40 miles north of Mobile. North Louisiana, when freed by Richard Taylor, one of her sons, from the
which force he marched into New Mexico. His design was to take possession of that territory for the Confederate States. He advanced into the territory along the Rio Grande, at Valverde defeated the Union forces under Colonel (afterward General) Canby, and then moved forward and occupied Albuquerque and Santa Fe. He had expected to subsist his army on supplies found in the country, but in this was disappointed, for Canby had taken care to destroy all supplies that could fall into the hands ofCanby had taken care to destroy all supplies that could fall into the hands of the Confederates. He found himself in the heart of a country without supplies and with well-equipped hostile forces gathering in his front and rear. Under these circumstances he was obliged to retreat, a movement which was accomplished in the face of the most appalling difficulties. He passed on the west side of the Sierra Madelena, through the Sierra de San Mateo until he reached the dry bed of the Rio Palomas, down which he continued until he reached the Rio Grande, where supplies had bee