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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 3: up the St. Mary's. (search)
Not so the old ladies, when I announced to them my purpose, and added, with extreme regret, that, as the wind was high, I should burn only that half of the town which lay to leeward of their house, which did not, after all, amount to much. Between gratitude for this degree of mercy, and imploring appeals for greater, the treacherous old ladies manoeuvred with clasped hands and demonstrative handkerchiefs around me, impairing the effect of their eloquence by constantly addressing me as Mr. Captain ; for I have observed, that, while the sternest officer is greatly propitiated by attributing to him a rank a little higher than his own, yet no one is ever mollified by an error in the opposite direction. I tried, however, to disregard such low considerations, and to strike the correct mean between the sublime patriot and the unsanctified incendiary, while I could find no refuge from weak contrition save in greater and greater depths of courtesy; and so melodramatic became our interview
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxviii. (search)
ve years ago to take the logs over the rapids, but he was skilful with a raft, and always kept her straight in the channel. Finally a steamer was put on, and Jack — he's dead now, poor fellow!--was made captain of her. He always used to take the wheel going through the rapids. One day, when the boat was plunging and wallowing along the boiling current, and Jack's utmost vigilance was being exercised to keep her in the narrow channel, a boy pulled his coat-tail and hailed him with: Say, Mister Captain! I wish you would just stop your boat a minute — I've lost my apple overboard! At a time of financial difficulty, a committee of New York bankers waited upon the Secretary of the Treasury and volunteered a loan to the government, which was gratefully accepted. Mr. Chase subsequently accompanied the gentlemen to the White House and introduced them to the President, saying they had called to have a talk with him about money. Money, replied Mr. Lincoln; I don't know anything about mo
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), A private Battery. (search)
d at our private and particular business and bosoms, discompose us into querulous interrogatory? It will be a long time, we fancy, before we shall see Mr. James W. Meredith's guns gaping in this neighborhood. That battery is a fixture. It is for the protection of Capt. Meredith, Mrs. Meredith and all the little Merediths! Old Meredith maintains a battery that he may breakfast, dine, sup, sleep, sow, reap and flog at his ease. It will be an improvident procedure, and one which we hope Mrs. Captain will not consent to, for Meredith to permit the battery to go off the place. We neither borrow nor lend batteries, should be the Meredith legend. Buy your own batteries, should be the steady answer upon application for a loan. It is not all of us who can afford the luxury of a Private Battery. We have seen fearful statistics of the actual cost of discharging once a single gun. To say nothing of the expense of private gunners and swabbers and rammers and powder-monkeys. But Meredith
are taken as good care of as our own, though that is not the best, medicine being scarce. Lyon's corpse is now within one hundred yards of my tent; it was disinterred this afternoon, and to-morrow starts for St. Louis. Billy Corkery and Bob Finney are our Second and Third Lieutenants. Johnny Corkery is severely wounded, but will recover. I was wounded at Carthage by shell, but am now as well as ever. I have the honor to be, With great respect, yours truly, W. P. Barlow, First Lieutenant Captain G.'s Battery, M. S. G. J. T. Hughes' account. On the morning of the tenth, Gen. Lyon attacked our encampment at break of day with fourteen thousand men and eighteen pieces of artillery, having received large reinforcements within the last few days. The attack was made simultaneously at four different points--Gen. Lyon on the west, Siegel on the south, Sturgis on the north, and Sweeney, I think, on the east. Our encampment was taken by surprise, but in hot haste soon for
are taken as good care of as our own, though that is not the best, medicine being scarce. Lyon's corpse is now within one hundred yards of my tent; it was disinterred this afternoon, and to-morrow starts for St. Louis. Billy Corkery and Bob Finney are our Second and Third Lieutenants. Johnny Corkery is severely wounded, but will recover. I was wounded at Carthage by shell, but am now as well as ever. I have the honor to be, With great respect, yours truly, W. P. Barlow, First Lieutenant Captain G.'s Battery, M. S. G. J. T. Hughes' account. On the morning of the tenth, Gen. Lyon attacked our encampment at break of day with fourteen thousand men and eighteen pieces of artillery, having received large reinforcements within the last few days. The attack was made simultaneously at four different points--Gen. Lyon on the west, Siegel on the south, Sturgis on the north, and Sweeney, I think, on the east. Our encampment was taken by surprise, but in hot haste soon for
ompanions, accompanying them in their perilous and dreary flight from their homes and estates. Miss Taylor has formed a determination to share with her late companions the dangers and fatigues of a military campaign. She has donned a neat blue chapeau, beneath which her long hair is fantastically arranged, bearing at her side a highly-finished regulation sword, and silver-mounted pistols in her belt, all of which gives her a very neat and martial appearance. She is quite the idol of the Tennessee boys. They look upon her as a second Joan of Arc, believing that victory and glory will perch upon the standards borne in the ranks favored by her presence. Miss Captain T. is all courage and skill. Having become an adept in the sword exercise, and a sure shot with the pistol, she is determined to lead in the van of the march, bearing her exiled and oppressed countrymen back to their homes, or, if failing, to offer up her own life's blood in the sacrifice.--Baltimore American, Oct. 23.
d fifty rebels with their arms and horses. The bearing and efficiency of my staff-officers, Lieut. Holstein, A. A. General, and Lieutenants Pease and Morrison, aids-de-camp, were conspicuous everywhere, fearlessly executing every order. Every part of the field witnessed their gallantry. My Division Surgeon, Benjamin Newland, deserves the highest commendation for his promptness and skill — establishing his hospitals and taking care of the wounded. My Division Quartermaster and Commissary Captain, Branson and Bradley, performed their duties equally prompt and efficiently. The superior number of the enemy's forces, engaged as he was in his favorite scrub, his utter rout when led on to desperation at the loss of two of his famous generals on the field, is sufficient proof of the valor and patriotism of the troops displayed in every conflict with the enemy. Both officers and men fought with a courage and determination seldom excelled, and which will ever entitle them to the grat
The school of the soldier Fenwick Y. Hedley, Brevet Captain United States Volunteers, and Adjutant, Thirty-second, Illinois Infantry Veterans already in 1861 These drummer-boys of the Eighth Regiment of the National Guard of the State of New York were photographed in the '50s, wearing their Mexican War uniforms. The boys of this regiment went to the front in these same uniforms and marched throughout the war. The American volunteer of 1861-65 never before had his like, or ever will again. He was of only the third generation from the Revolutionary War, and the first after the Mexican War, and he had personal acquaintance with men who had fought in each. Besides, a consideration of much meaning, he was brought up in a day when school declamation was practised, and once a week he had spoken or heard Patrick Henry's Give me liberty or give me death, Webster's Reply to Hayne, The Battle of Buena Vista, The Charge of the Light Brigade, The boy stood on the burning deck, an
Marches of the Federal armies Fenwick Y. Hedley, Brevet Captain, United States Volunteers, and Adjutant, Thirty-second Illinois Infantry It was said of Napoleon that he overran Europe with the bivouac. It was the bivouac that sapped the spirit and snapped the sinews of the Confederacy. No other war in history presents marches marked with such unique and romantic experiences as those of the Federal armies in the Civil War. It is worth while to note one march which has received little attention from annalists—one of much importance at the moment, in the meaning it gave to the word discipline, and, also, in the direction it gave to the fortunes of the man who was destined to direct all the armies of the Union. Early in the opening war-year, 1861, an embryo Illinois regiment was on the verge of dissolution. It was made up of as good flesh and blood and spirit as ever followed the drum. But the colonel was a politician without military training, and under him the men refuse
ant John S. Keck, Fourth Iowa cavalry, and A. A. D. C., for gallant conduct at Columbus, April sixteenth, 1865, to be Brevet Captain. Second Lieutenant Peter R. Keck, Fourth Iowa cavalry, Acting Ordnance Officer, for his habitual good conduct in tout the campaign, and especially for gallantry in a charge near Montevallo, on the thirty-first of March, 1865, to be Brevet Captain. Captain Lot Abraham, commanding Company D, Fourth Iowa cavalry, for his gallantry at Columbus, April sixteenth, 1in advance of the other troops until their arrival, receiving a terribly severe fire from front and left flank, to be Brevet Captain. First Lieutenant J. A. 0. Yeoman, First Ohio cavalry, and A. A. I. G. Second brigade, Fourth division, for his mgallantry, and indefatigable courage, energy, and perseverance, exhibited on all occasions during the campaign, to be Brevet Captain. Second Lieutenant Ferdinand Owen, Company I, Tenth Missouri cavalry, for his gallantry in leading his command ove
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